SS and Jiu Jitsu SS and Jiu Jitsu

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Thread: SS and Jiu Jitsu

  1. #1
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    Default SS and Jiu Jitsu

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    Mark, Over the last year, I tore my left meniscus and suffered a partial tear to my right MCL (meniscus in Aug 2018 and MCL in March 2019). I finally had my meniscus trimmed Aug 2019 and a few weeks later I was ready to start training again. Iím 6 weeks into your program and my strength gains are coming baking nicely. 2 weeks ago I started training Jiu Jitsu again. My typical classes are mon, wed and Friday nights... the same days I lift (I lift early in the am before work). Due to some competitions coming up, many of our grapplers are in comp prep mode and we are rolling pretty hard, which means Iím pretty sore a day or two after class.
    Do you suggest I continue this current schedule or bump my lifting days a day back to tues thurs and sat? I know that Iím going to be sore no matter what, but it doesnít seem to be affecting my strength when Iím lifting.
    Thanks for any insight you can provide.

  2. #2
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    Since I have no way of knowing how hard you're actually training, I suggest you try it both ways for two weeks each and see which works best for you. Make sure you're eating enough.

  3. #3
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    The biggest concern here is not the soreness - further injuring a joint is. Training post-injury with people preparing for competition is not something I'd recommend. If they hurt you (even if it's just a random fuck up), neither you nor they are going to be better for it.

    I have not had a meniscus tear or repair, so I can't specifically tell you what results you're going to get. However, training with active competitors is grueling and injuries happen far more often as a result. When I'm injured and want to roll with someone, I make sure they understand I'm not looking to roll like it's Worlds. If they are training for competition, they may decide they don't want to roll with me. That's fine.

    How long have you been training jiujitsu?

  4. #4
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    If you can be disciplined enough to not go ape-shit on the mats on every single roll, it doesn't matter too much when you lift. Just do the version that will keep you compliant with your workouts in the gym and try to keep your ego in check on the mat. If everyone else is in competition mode and you're not, you're just going to get tapped a bunch more.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the input... Iím not really concerned about the soreness... thatís temporary because I just got back into rolling hard after after close to a year of light rolling while injured and then recovering from the surgery. My knee feels fine now. My concern is recovery from workouts... Iíll continue with the M, W, F workouts for a few more weeks and then switch to T, T, S and see how I feel and how Iím progressing in the program.

  6. #6
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    Iíve been training for 13 years. Got promoted to brown belt last year. I tore my meniscus shortly after and my training came to a screeching halt.

  7. #7
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    I’d suggest you do fundamentals class and not spar until your NLP is done. Speaking from personal experience, it is very difficult to roll hard and have enough recovery to make much progress with any serious injury.

    You won’t lose any skill from taking 2 additional months from sparring and the conditioning will come back in a week. Remember: cardio is the enemy of hypertrophy and strength gains and is BJJ not the most intense cardio you can think of?

    I guarantee you that if you have a solid NLP without any sparring you won’t worry about your knee when you spar again. I’ve seen a lot of guys stunt their post-op recovery time by rolling again too soon.

    Even if you’re taking it easy, a spazzy white belt can fuck up your knee without even intending to.

    And if you’re related to Tim Kennedy then go ahead and keep sparring you fucking savage!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Kennedy View Post
    I’ve been training for 13 years. Got promoted to brown belt last year. I tore my meniscus shortly after and my training came to a screeching halt.
    I really think that you're going to be perfectly fine. The advice to take it easy at Jiu Jitsu is for people with less experience rolling. You already know how to manage your stress level on the mat, so lift whenever works best for your schedule to stay compliant three days/week. You'll move your programming along to advanced novice and then intermediate sooner than someone not doing Jiu Jitsu, so just progress your training variables when you need to - don't miss lifting workouts, eat more than you're used to, and keep adding weight to the bar workout to workout at first, then twice a week, then once a week.
    Last edited by Nick Delgadillo; 10-13-2019 at 09:34 AM.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Kennedy View Post
    Iíve been training for 13 years. Got promoted to brown belt last year. I tore my meniscus shortly after and my training came to a screeching halt.
    Then forget what I said.

    You know where you stand, and Nick's advice is right.

  10. #10
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    starting strength nutrition camp
    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Delgadillo View Post
    I really think that you're going to be perfectly fine. The advice to take it easy at Jiu Jitsu is for people with less experience rolling. You already know how to manage your stress level on the mat, so lift whenever works best for your schedule to stay compliant three days/week. You'll move your programming along to advanced novice and then intermediate sooner than someone not doing Jiu Jitsu, so just progress your training variables when you need to - don't miss lifting workouts, eat more than you're used to, and keep adding weight to the bar workout to workout at first, then twice a week, then once a week.
    Thanks again... The eating more part is the biggest change for me, but it's been pretty easy because I've been starving ever since I got back to training BJJ. Because of the knee surgery in Aug, I started with relatively light weight for most of the movements but am now getting into some challenging weights. The heavy weights plus hard BJJ sessions has me wanting to eat constantly.

    BTW, started week 6 of my program today and set my working set on the press was more than I've ever done for a 1RM... I guess this stuff works.

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