SS Radio #26: Robert Santana RD SSC: Aesthetics SS Radio #26: Robert Santana RD SSC: Aesthetics

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Thread: SS Radio #26: Robert Santana RD SSC: Aesthetics

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    This may be one of those questions you feel you have answered too many times, but it struck me afresh having been recently paying detailed attention to my calorie consumption: How can anyone get 250 grams of protein inside a reasonable number of calories? Is whey supplementation unavoidable? - and, even then... Do you guys both always drink a whey shake every day? Or is this similar to the milk - recommended for young novices only?

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    Quote Originally Posted by tallison View Post
    This may be one of those questions you feel you have answered too many times, but it struck me afresh having been recently paying detailed attention to my calorie consumption: How can anyone get 250 grams of protein inside a reasonable number of calories? Is whey supplementation unavoidable? - and, even then... Do you guys both always drink a whey shake every day? Or is this similar to the milk - recommended for young novices only?
    This was discussed some in the podcast. When your protein sources are lean you should be able to hit this without issue. Let's assume that you are eating nonfat sources (which is unlikely 100% of the time), you are talking about 1000 calories from protein, which leaves you 1500-2500 from carbohydrate and fat, which is on the low end of what most novices will need. Keep in mind that you aren't getting all 250 grams from animal products, you are also getting protein grams from grains, legumes, nuts, and various other foods. As a general rule if you are eating ~8 oz of lean meat or 5 servings of nonfat or lowfat dairy, 3 times per day, you should be able to get a solid 150 grams of protein without accumulating excessive fat calories. Whey can supplement an additional 40 grams, leaving the reset to come from your carbohydrate and fat sources.

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    OK. Many thanks for the response. This does bring up my one other issue with what I am hearing in your discussion, here - namely, fat as the main „enemy“. That also seems to make sense if one is wanting to get enough protein with a reasonable number of calories, but it *really* strongly reminds me of the anti-fat craze that seemed to move through popular culture in the 80‘s and 90‘s. But maybe the issue then was everyone’s substituting shit tons of sugar/other carbs but thinking that was OK because of „low fat“?

    Obviously fat carries flavor, so I, being the hedonist that I am, took the whole „fats are not evil - drink your whole milk, eat real butter and have as many eggs as you want“ dietary recommendation revisions of the last decade, or so, as license to return to the diet of my uninformed, happy youth. You seem to be saying that to train successfully and move toward 20% or lower body fat, I may need to be a bit more restrictive. Fair synopsis?

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    I think that perhaps a better method to the whole aesthetics issue is to help people realize what "lean" actually looks like. When all you see if the magazines and instagram posts you would start to think that people actually walk around looking like that all the time. I am a fairly lean, strong (at least I think I'm strong person) and you can "see" my abs, but they don't look like a bodybuilder's. That's ok, and I think most people would agree that as far as aesthetics go I look fine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by atw_abn View Post
    I think that perhaps a better method to the whole aesthetics issue is to help people realize what "lean" actually looks like.
    This has been discussed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tallison View Post
    OK. Many thanks for the response. This does bring up my one other issue with what I am hearing in your discussion, here - namely, fat as the main „enemy“. That also seems to make sense if one is wanting to get enough protein with a reasonable number of calories, but it *really* strongly reminds me of the anti-fat craze that seemed to move through popular culture in the 80‘s and 90‘s. But maybe the issue then was everyone’s substituting shit tons of sugar/other carbs but thinking that was OK because of „low fat“?

    Obviously fat carries flavor, so I, being the hedonist that I am, took the whole „fats are not evil - drink your whole milk, eat real butter and have as many eggs as you want“ dietary recommendation revisions of the last decade, or so, as license to return to the diet of my uninformed, happy youth. You seem to be saying that to train successfully and move toward 20% or lower body fat, I may need to be a bit more restrictive. Fair synopsis?
    Most people do not just eat sugar. Instead of focusing one one nutrient I prefer to label it as a triad that I have referred to for many years as "The Triple S:" Saturated Fat, Sodium, Sugar. Most people are consuming all three in excess amounts. But of course the academics would tell me that I cannot prove that but neither can They given that there is no reliable method for measuring food intake. What I will say is that this has been discussed in mainstream media, research papers, and most importantly for our purposes, digital photography collected from clients. Let's also not ignore the market: What do you see on most street corners? What is served on most menus?

    The takeaway point is that fruit, whole grains, whole milk and eggs, and lean-to-medium fat meats, are not necessarily the issue here. Donuts, deep fried meats, cream sauces, high fat condiments, and "snack foods" (e.g. chips, french fries, etc.), all contain large quantities of fat, sugar, sodium, or all three and these are commonly available foods in the 2019 food environment.

    Quote Originally Posted by atw_abn View Post
    I think that perhaps a better method to the whole aesthetics issue is to help people realize what "lean" actually looks like. When all you see if the magazines and instagram posts you would start to think that people actually walk around looking like that all the time. I am a fairly lean, strong (at least I think I'm strong person) and you can "see" my abs, but they don't look like a bodybuilder's. That's ok, and I think most people would agree that as far as aesthetics go I look fine.
    This depends who you ask. The average joe on the street thinks I'm lean and the bottom 3% of YouTube thinks I'm fat.

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    This was an excellent podcast. Thanks, Robert for your great work on this board and on the radio.

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    starting strength coach development program
    You are welcome and thank you for listening

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