RPE RPE - Page 3

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Thread: RPE

  1. #21
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    I remember in March of 2017 needing appendix surgery. I was 38. I thought I would no longer be squatting over 400. Small potatoes to some I know. But I have a coach that got me going again. I ran the NLP for as long as I could. Started with 225 or so. Once I couldnít do the NLP, I did 100, 80, 90 percent. Eventually it went to 100,72, 90 percent. Anyway, by the end of October i squatted 460 for three and went to the fall meet. Had I gave into how the weight felt I would have stopped at 385. And RPE is not new. Lifters have been doing this for a long time. Paused squats, tempo squats, High bar squats, speed squats, etc, etc.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fatfacts25 View Post
    And RPE is not new. Lifters have been doing this for a long time.
    But now it's Technology.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    But now it's Technology.
    Thatís funny man. Itís nothing more than percentages used for squat variation or starting points. I rarely use it for that. Strategic planning and hard work are better than going by your feelings. I just donít like this RPE stuff. Itís an excuse is what it is!!!!

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by MWM View Post
    But the whole point of RPE is that it's based on how you feel, and if how you feel doesn't accurately predict what you're actually capable of, then what is the use of RPE?
    Except with more experience using RPE, people get better at using RPE. Accuracy increases.

    It appears that a lot of people who are against RPE dismiss "how you feel" as if this judgement occurs in a vacuum irrespective of all past experience using RPE.

    I know it's going to feel like RPE 8, but I know from my experience using RPE that it's really RPE 10,'
    Except that's not at all how gaining more experience in a thing works - you don't simultaneously retain a mistaken perception while also achieving a more correct perception.

    If you know from your experience that a particular lift is an RPE 10, it cannot feel like an 8 anymore. Your example illustrates how learning RPE actually works. Yes, you may have once mistakenly thought a 10 was an 8 when you had less experience, but you have recalibrated your perception and are able to more correctly estimate RPE.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nockian View Post
    I carried out an ad hoc bit of experimentation on a few very experienced, advanced lifters in my gym. One of them knew what RPE was and considered it useful, though he didn't actually use it.

    On the second set of the working set, I asked them to rate their RPE. They all estimated 7 or 8 which means they had 2-3 reps left in the tank. After a short rest I asked them to see how many reps they could actually achieve. The results were surprising, but in hindsight perhaps they weren't surprising at all.

    How many additional reps do you think they did ?
    I have a really hard time even bothering to engage with someone who wouldn't spend $50 on PPST to further their training. Says a lot about you.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrflibble View Post
    Except with more experience using RPE, people get better at using RPE. Accuracy increases.

    It appears that a lot of people who are against RPE dismiss "how you feel" as if this judgement occurs in a vacuum irrespective of all past experience using RPE.

    Except that's not at all how gaining more experience in a thing works - you don't simultaneously retain a mistaken perception while also achieving a more correct perception.

    If you know from your experience that a particular lift is an RPE 10, it cannot feel like an 8 anymore. Your example illustrates how learning RPE actually works. Yes, you may have once mistakenly thought a 10 was an 8 when you had less experience, but you have recalibrated your perception and are able to more correctly estimate RPE.
    Eventually, you see, RPE becomes data. It's a technology. Despite the fact that after 42 years of training, I cannot always tell if the last rep of a set will go back up until I do the rep. The fact is that RPE is a way to manage clients in online training -- like the 30-visit chiropractor, it is a business model, and that is all it is. And you fools have swallowed the bait.

    As I said, this thread will not go 11 pages. If all you people are going to do is reiterate the same tired shit you always post, we're done. Talk about something else.

  7. #27
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    ...you don't simultaneously retain a mistaken perception while also achieving a more correct perception.
    Review the following and reassess the above quoted statement:

    http://persci.mit.edu/gallery/checkershadow

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by wiigelec View Post
    Review the following and reassess the above quoted statement:

    Checkershadow Illusion
    I love that illusion. The first time I saw it, I had to cut and paste part of the A into the B to be convinced. Even knowing how it works, I cannot look at that and simultaneously see both A and B as (incorrectly) different shades and also them correctly as the same shade. I doubt anyone can do that.

    If anything, I'd say this supports your quote more than not. Of course, an illusion designed to mislead isn't analogous to developing a more skilled perception under similiar, repeatable conditions.

  9. #29
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    E1RM-TABLE-1024x322.jpg

    This certainly looks like technology!

    It's a disingenuous business model. Because they will hand you out this table that is supposed to predict your weights for submaximal percentage work and estimate your 1RM. But probably 100 years ago people knew that submaximal percentage work for lightweight grandma is not the same as submaximal percentage work for young explosive male. And then as a result of that, lightweight grandma takes 81.1% of her E1RM for a set of 5, expects it to be an RPE 8 and then rates it with RPE 8 when in fact she could've done 14 reps with it.

    Sorry Rip, I'm having a hard time ignoring this bullshit. I'm probably too invested in this.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrflibble View Post
    developing a more skilled perception under similiar, repeatable conditions.
    Illusions aside, at age 69, having taken up the iron in high school and engaged in all manner of errant lifting nonsense since then, it seems likely that my perceptions of similar and repeatable conditions have a fair track record. But limiting your daily capacity for work and achievement based on your momentary perceptions can be and often is self defeating.

    From my log on Monday:

    One of those mornings when you get awakened by the thunder at 3:00. The right middle finger aching along with the right wrist. Then too, the triceps and shoulders sore from some arboreal trimming of overhanging branches. Finally, giving the last pretense of sleep just before 6 and creaking away into the gym. Not expecting anything spectacular what with the wake ups and aches, but determined to hack away in the salt mines.

    Seated Press: 160 for 6 singles followed by a backoff set with 140 and 4 reps. My wrist held up reasonably well for the singles, but started to bark and howl at the moon with the reps. So I bailed. The pre-fatigued arms and delts didn't help either.

    Lateral Raises: Sets of 12, 95-100-105.

    Cable Pulldowns: Sets of 12, 60-50-70.

    Calf Raises: Sets of 12, 225-235-245.

    Rolled and careful external rotation.

    So. All in all, not a bad session. Proof that 80% of success is simply showing up. Even if you have to grit your teeth.
    I'm old, and I frequently hurt from old injuries and arthritis and a recently developed trigger finger condition. If you let yourself be guided just by how sore or tired or unrecovered you FEEL you are, you are accepting a lesser performance. Or, as you get old, letting The Reaper steal a march on you.

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