Why is hookgrip easier/better than straps? Why is hookgrip easier/better than straps? - Page 2

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Thread: Why is hookgrip easier/better than straps?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    I have not observed this, and my only explanation would be that hook grip is obtained faster and with less drama than fooling around with straps.
    My first rep with straps is always a little screwy because the setup isn't quite the same. I never quite seem to be in the same position as I get from your deadlift setup steps. Like, not quite over midfoot, or the shin angle isn't perfect, or something like that.

  2. #12
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    You can strap more than you can hook, always. But you have to practice with them so that they go on quickly and correctly, and so that your stance and back position are correct for the pull.

  3. #13
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    I noticed the same thing as Andrew. I have played around with alternating grip too. It feels like there is a more direct connection to the bar without straps.

    I had come to two ideas on the matter:

    1. The straps may act similarly to an added rigid joint in the kinetic chain (Similar to the SI joint) thus causing a small amount of energy leak; It doesn't move much or cause much deformation, but it is enough to notice under heavy load.

    2. It may be a psychological phenomenon; The brain may incorrectly perceive a less secure grip because of the distribution of mechanical force around the outside of the hand and send inhibitory signals to the musculature in response.


    Then again, maybe it is more about the increased time required to put them on and less than ideal body-positioning. I typically question if Rip is right on these things, then, as I work through it, I learn he was right.

    Rip, do you recommend shorter straps, because they can go on more quickly?

  4. #14
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    Longer straps are easier to use, and you only take one wrap around the bar anyway. See the sequence photos in the book. And this whole discussion may be the result of a misunderstanding of the weight used on rack pulls. Light weights can be hooked, very heavy weights must be strapped.

  5. #15
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    Makes sense. I haven't added rack pulls to my program yet anyway, so I was curious.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    And this whole discussion may be the result of a misunderstanding of the weight used on rack pulls. Light weights can be hooked, very heavy weights must be strapped.
    This could be the case. I was strapping the same weight I was hookgripping.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrewLewis View Post
    This could be the case. I was strapping the same weight I was hookgripping.
    As was I.

    My form also does in fact appear to be a little different when hook gripping vs. strapping.

  8. #18
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    I used to wuss around with straps. I found I wasn’t getting good proprioceptive feedback from my hands. For me, it was hard to tell whether I was set up properly and tight when I was using the straps. Grips are prone to opening up, but they let you squeeze real hard in the hands, and the hand bone’s connected to the arm bone and so on down the chain. So even though the straps can help you handle more weight, I wouldn’t be surprised if the hook “feels” tighter and more stable all the way down the chain. Just my two cents from my own training.

  9. #19
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    For me, straps are a godsend. I've tried reverse overhand (kills my elbow after one rep) and hook grip (amazingly painful even after coaching with Paul Horn due to thumb fracture with mal-alignment as a teenager). The only way I advance on my DL is with straps. I use double overhand grip on all my warm up sets and the first few sets of my volume worksets until I feel like I'm going to drop the bar on the way down then switch to straps. Unfortunately, all my intensity day worksets are with straps.

    This formula DOES help me strengthen my grip (which is very important to me when I roll in jiu-jitsu with gi) but it's obviously suboptimal. Then again, I also wish Salma Hayek would stop pretending that she doesn't know me.

  10. #20
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    starting strength coach development program
    I’ve noticed that the heavier the weight the hook grip will get stronger. I chalk the whole thumb.

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