Why is hookgrip easier/better than straps? Why is hookgrip easier/better than straps? - Page 3

starting strength gym
Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 44

Thread: Why is hookgrip easier/better than straps?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    40,022

    Default

    • wichita falls texas march seminar date
    • woodmere new york april seminar date
    Quote Originally Posted by Fatfacts25 View Post
    I’ve noticed that the heavier the weight the hook grip will get stronger. I chalk the whole thumb.
    What is the weight?

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    45

    Default

    Iím an average lifter so keep that in mind. Iíve hooked 570.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    40,022

    Default

    That's pretty good for a hooked deadlift.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    45

    Default

    Iím here to tell ya hook grip is the correct grip to teach. Less torque on the arms. The heavier the weight the better for hook grip. Chalk helps a lot. Both sides of the thumb.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    40,022

    Default

    We do. Come to a seminar.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    1,647

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    Why would this be necessary, Dave?
    To avoid the thumb pain of the hook grip

    Quote Originally Posted by AndrewLewis View Post
    That makes sense.



    It seems like that would make the deadlift less secure with no additional benefit.
    How so, if the cylinder were knurled?

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    40,022

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dpinsen View Post
    To avoid the thumb pain of the hook grip
    Ah. Got it.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Akron, OH
    Posts
    1,099

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dpinsen View Post
    How so, if the cylinder were knurled?
    I'd have to try it out to see how it feels, but it seems like a similar concept to wearing lifting gloves. The more contact surfaces you introduces into the system, the more chance for slipping. I think it would probably hold against the bar and skin fine, but the inner sleeve to thumb contact is what I'd be worried about.

    Again, I haven't used them, but that's my thinking.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    537

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dpinsen View Post
    Have you experimented with any thumb protection equipment for the hook grip? I saw a few thumb sleeves online, but it seems like a steel cylinder covering your thumbnail would make more sense. Haven't seen one of those yet.
    Yeah, its called a thimble? And yes, that would be stupid.
    The more your delicate thumb parts crush and flatten out, the more surface area there is to grip the bar's knurl.

    And you are are getting "protection" and "grip enhancement" confused.
    People tape thumbs for different reasons.
    Some it is for protection, you will tear callouses (maybe).
    (olympic lifters might be using hook grip for several different exercise per day, several days a week).
    Some of it, yes, is for grip.

    Those premade thumb sleeves are mostly marketed more for Crossfitters....doing high rep WODs (light weights).
    Tape is better.
    Tape might help with grip if your gym has a chalk ban.
    If you are travelling a lot, it might be a good idea to have a roll of tape in your bag, and know how to use it.
    Tape can also help with a torn callous in other places on your hand, and has other uses.

    I never done it myself, but I've heard of people filing small grooves into their thumbnails,
    or simply scuffing up their thumbnails for more friction.
    And even growing their thumbnails out a bit more than normal.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Appleton, WI
    Posts
    2,125

    Default

    starting strength coach development program
    I have noticed something similar, hooked deadlift sets feel better and faster, partly because I feel I set me back better. I wonder if there is a proprioceptive response to HAVING to hold on to the bar with the hook versus just being along for the ride with the straps. Being able to have the lats, arm muscles, and back muscles contract harder because you are gripping the bar.

Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •