SS Radio #35: The Old Guy Episode SS Radio #35: The Old Guy Episode

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Thread: SS Radio #35: The Old Guy Episode

  1. #1
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  2. #2
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    Nothing wrong with a little Nespresso!

  3. #3
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    Helpful. Can you generalize about folks that didn't really start trying to get strong until their late 40s/early 50s? Is the NLP significantly different for them? How do they know when they've probably peaked, strength-wise?

  4. #4
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    Pat Casey of bench press fame remarked late in life that it's kind of pathetic the weights you are reduced to as you get older. I'm paraphrasing of course, but that was the main message.

    At 69, I look back and achieved semi-visible abs twice in my life, once at 29 and once at 42. It left me drawn and weak both times.

    Injuries? Oh yeah. A long catalog of broken arms, ankles, toes, and a foot. Stitches from fights and falls and racquetball rackets and mishandled sharp objects. A dislocated shoulder and multiple head traumas from falls, fights, accidents, Judo tournaments and practice, automobile accidents, and a couple of spills off my motorcycles over the years. Only one surgery though, and that was just last month for trigger finger. Lucked there at least.

    Too much volume, too many sets, too many reps, too much BS from Weider, Inc. and his minions. Stalled gains for years as a result and from too much running, thanks of ken Cooper.

    I just lost 50 lbs. in the last year and lost some strength as a result that I am struggling to regain. The good news is that although I started competing in powerlifting again, I don't have to lift as much in a lower weight class and an older age division. But still, I am trying my damnedest to manage a 242 bench press again. Or squat 300 again. I might make 400 in the deadlift again, but not for a while yet.

    My sleep is better, now that I quit drinking and am not carrying around 50 pounds of excess fat.

    But the reality is that I am getting less strong. BUT! I am still far in better shape than my counterparts.

  5. #5
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    I enjoyed the episode, thanks.

    Question: In your opinion, how much of a difference in outcomes is there from adhering to a "minimal effective dose" regimen vs a "maximal recoverable dose" regimen?

    As I look back on my last few years of training, knowing when to "rack the bar" has been the most important lesson I've learned. I may have left a few kgs on the platform, but it's kept me from getting hurt doing something stupid. And that's hard to remember when one's training with a group of competitive men and women in their 20s and 30s.

    Do what you can, with what you have, where you are...

  6. #6
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    Nice work, Mark. Itís encouraging to see people in your age bracket to make such dramatic changes in body comp and stay motivated to compete, especially with a long list of injuries.

    I may not agree with everything you say, but i respect and admire your tenacity.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Browndog View Post
    Question: In your opinion, how much of a difference in outcomes is there from adhering to a "minimal effective dose" regimen vs a "maximal recoverable dose" regimen?
    It's difference between enjoying your training and not enjoying your training. In other words, why are you here? Be realistic, try it both ways, and decide for yourself.

  8. #8
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    Another great episode, Mark. I could hear the sincerity in your voice on how much pride you have in this. Cheers

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soule View Post
    Nice work, Mark. It’s encouraging to see people in your age bracket to make such dramatic changes in body comp and stay motivated to compete, especially with a long list of injuries.

    I may not agree with everything you say, but i respect and admire your tenacity.
    Thank you. I decided to start competing again this year after taking on coaching Special Olympians in powerlifting and the shot put. After watching the Summer Games meet, I got inspired by the enthusiasm and courage of the Olympians and the support of the spectators. So back into the fray to promote Special Olympics any way I can. These are some really wonderful people who benefit so much from the experience of training and competing.

    As to agreeing with everything I say? Not even Dearly Beloved does that, and she's had over 42 years to get used to my BS.

    Finally, what's the alternative to it all? Not training? Nah. I am just not that guy.

  10. #10
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    starting strength coach development program
    When talking to people my age about lifting I am often told that I shouldn't be lifting because I'm too old. There are times when I start to think "I'm getting too old for this" but a walk around my local streets seeing the shufflers, the mobility scooters and the beaten dog expression in the stoop of men too old for their age, makes me quickly reevaluate "I'm really too old NOT to do this".

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