How to Get Testosterone Checked How to Get Testosterone Checked - Page 4

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Thread: How to Get Testosterone Checked

  1. #31
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    • wichita falls texas march seminar date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank_B View Post
    . . . total bio-available of ~200-250 (I can’t remember the exact number). . . . free T was 7 which . . .
    I thought "bio-available" and "free" meant the same.

    Also, units for above quantities? ng/dL and/or pg/mL ?

    My recent test results show total = 630 ng/dL and free = 64.9 pg/mL. Both #s are within some nominal ranges of (250, 1100) and (35,155), respectively. I suppose that's why they aren't drawing comments from the doctor.

    Thanks,

    Vince

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    The 300-1200 reference range is what a large group of people display when tested. It has nothing to do with what should be, but what is. Like cars are somewhere between empty and full.
    This is very true. As a 56 year old avid lifter and in great shape compared to the masses, my test was significantly under 200. On 100mg/week I felt/feel worlds better (believe me when I say I was in a very bad mental place prior to T optimization.)

    But after 6 months, I came back at just over 300. But I felt like I had a new lease on life. My doc said heíd rather me be closer to 600 but we decided to just see how it plays out... for no other reason than curiosity. Heís a GP by the way.

    But I definitely feel the titer of once per week at 100mg. By the end of the week prior to the next injection, I can feel it. Itís not horrible but itís enough to make adjustments.

    Getting my test in check was the best thing I ever could have done for myself.

    One of the biggest myths in the world is that testosterone doesnít matter with mental health. Of course, itís not the be all, some folks require more chemical intervention, but hormone levels need to be checked and optimized (if needed) first.

    It could be the answer.

  3. #33
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    Jul 2019
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    Quote Originally Posted by VNV View Post
    I thought "bio-available" and "free" meant the same.

    Also, units for above quantities? ng/dL and/or pg/mL ?

    My recent test results show total = 630 ng/dL and free = 64.9 pg/mL. Both #s are within some nominal ranges of (250, 1100) and (35,155), respectively. I suppose that's why they aren't drawing comments from the doctor.

    Thanks,

    Vince
    Vince,

    I could have completely screwed up "bioavailable." This certainly isn't my wheelhouse. My labs were in ng/DL.

    I'll get treated for a month and when I go back for the followup bloodwork we'll see how I feel relative to the bloodwork. If the bloodwork shows marked improvement, but I'm not feeling relatively better, than I'll just chalk it up to it not being low T.

  4. #34
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    May 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gbraddock View Post
    My apologies...I guess you canít see my tongue planted into my cheek online.

    Big SMILE>>
    No problem. I was afraid you might be a doctor.

    Bigger SMILE>>

  5. #35
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    Top 2 places in the male body for test receptors is brain and heart. Low T is devastating to our brain and heart health.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by grichens View Post
    Not really. According to a paper published N.I.H. here:

    A Validated Age-Related Normative Model for Male Total Testosterone Shows Increasing Variance but No Decline after Age 40 Years

    Total T stays fairly constant after the age of 40 in spite of what most doctors tend to believe. The left side of the curve (men with total T < 50 percentile) tends to skew further left, while the right side of the curve stays constant for ages 40-88
    good find ^

    - which suggests environmental factors are the cause of any observed decline in average total T across the population instead of age. I know Rip has beat this drum before. But it's refreshing to see it published.
    ...could you further explain "environmental factors" ?

  7. #37
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    I was told T has a half life of about 7 days. That's why they like to split the dose in Ĺ

  8. #38
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    Dec 2019
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrooklynJerry View Post
    I was told T has a half life of about 7 days. That's why they like to split the dose in Ĺ
    Itís dependent on the ester. So Testosterone Cypionate (usually used in TRT protocols in my area) has a half life of 5-7 days. I keep a fairly even level (checked bloods at day 3 post injection as well as day 7 over the years) on once a week injections. I still do IM injections though some have interest in injecting 1/2 dose every 3.5 days sub Q. Thatís too much maintenance for my Taste personally for the ROI.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fulcrum View Post
    good find ^



    ...could you further explain "environmental factors" ?
    I don't have much to elaborate on environmental factors other than the usual shit about diet, sleep, estrogen in drinking water, alcohol and drugs - of which everyone has an opinion. However I have another NIH paper that might be of interest. They compared testosterone levels between sets of adolescent twins of the same sex - mono & dizygotic. They found that "non-shared environmental factors" contribute significantly to the variance between siblings.

    Genetic and Environmental Influences on Testosterone in Adolescents: Evidence for Sex Differences

    You are welcome to pick the paper apart - I just scanned it. I would like to believe we can rule out alcohol and drugs as contributing factors. But you know kids these days.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gbraddock View Post
    Top 2 places in the male body for test receptors is brain and heart. Low T is devastating to our brain and heart health.
    Please provide references. There are androgen receptors almost everywhere in the body, but I have not read that brain and heart are the top 2.

    The relationship between T and heart health is complicated and not well understood. People who abuse anabolic steroids have worse cardiovascular outcomes. Men who supplement T within near-physiologic levels seem to have better cardiovascular health. Men whose androgen production is shut down, chemically and/or by castration, usually to treat cancer, do not seem to have worse cardiovascular outcomes.

    This is a complicated story, and I don't think that sweeping statements like this can be easily backed up.

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