What to do as a 27 male wanting to be as strong as possible What to do as a 27 male wanting to be as strong as possible

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Thread: What to do as a 27 male wanting to be as strong as possible

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
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    Default What to do as a 27 male wanting to be as strong as possible

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    Hey Rip! I have been a fan and have read your books several times, watched almost all your videos (most of them multiple times) etc. I have learnt a great deal from you and I thank you for everything you provide people with, I've been lucky to stumble upon your material and have achieved some strength that I didn't think was possible (conversely most people would find them laughable probably who are serious about strength). I have been doing starting strength lp for couple months (3 months or so). I had a break in between because life got in the way and had to take a break but got back on track. I'm on LP and I want your advice. I'm done f*** around and want to be the strongest I can be and I want your advice.

    I'm doing the LP and my lifts so far are as follows. I'm making sure to keep my form as good as possible.
    Squat - 325 X 5 (Failed yesterday ago as I didn't hit the depth on the first set and the 2nd,3th I missed reps.)
    Bench - 245X5 (I have switched to Dumbbell Bench Press as I had an injury in my elbow and I will get back to benching as soon as it feels normal)
    Deadlift - 365X5
    Military - 165X5

    I have recently plugged in Power Cleans and started alternating Deadlifts. I'm thinking of plugging in light days for squats but I'm not sure If I should first reset since I failed or try the same weight once more and then plug in a light day. Or do you think an intermediate program would be more beneficial ?

    I'm 27, 5'10 and 177lbs. I eat around 4k calories everyday with 250g+ protein and try to get as much sleep as possible. I want to squat 400+ and deadlift 500+ and bench 300+. And want to see how strong I can get, I want to find my limits and get as strong as possible and put on mass. I do not use drugs nor I plan to.

    My problem is I'm hearing different opinions on diet and how long LP should go on for. I don't really know what my plan should be in the short term and long term.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    North Texas
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    At 5'10" and 177, you are underweight about 30 pounds. If you are getting stuck, this is why. Tell me about the other opinions on diet and the LP.

  3. #3
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    The other opinions I have gotten are from different sources online. I'm reluctant to name people/institutions (but let's say you are familiar with them) but I think they are knowledgable as far as I can tell which is my source of confusion. If they are not lying (I know they are not.) then how come there is such a difference in opinion across the board, in other words how can they be so wrong ? I'm referring to the use of RPE dependent programs and moderate weight gain (1lbs gain per week) etc instead of pushing the weight while gaining strength on LP. The reason I ask you is because I trust you and have gotten results from doing what you are telling in the books. God knows I would have never figured out how to properly squat(ever) if not for the information I have gotten from your content.

  4. #4
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsiso View Post

    I'm 27, 5'10 and 177lbs. I eat around 4k calories everyday with 250g+ protein and try to get as much sleep as possible. I want to squat 400+ and deadlift 500+ and bench 300+. And want to see how strong I can get, I want to find my limits and get as strong as possible and put on mass. I do not use drugs nor I plan to.

    My problem is I'm hearing different opinions on diet and how long LP should go on for. I don't really know what my plan should be in the short term and long term.
    There are lots of things that will work, especially for a novice. The biggest mistake you can make is by switching among different styles/programs/philosophies instead of sticking with one consistently for a long enough time to see the results.

    The SSNLP has been observed to be a well-established method for novice lifters to predictably gain strength and mass fairly rapidly. It may in fact be the best way to do this, but that sort of thing is endlessly debatable. If you are waiting to see which style/system is definitively proven to be the absolute best over the long term with a large number of people, you will wait a very long time and miss an opportunity to have some nice gains while they are relatively easy to come by.


    Quote Originally Posted by jsiso View Post
    I'm referring to the use of RPE dependent programs and moderate weight gain (1lbs gain per week) etc instead of pushing the weight while gaining strength on LP. The reason I ask you is because I trust you and have gotten results from doing what you are telling in the books. God knows I would have never figured out how to properly squat(ever) if not for the information I have gotten from your content.
    My guess is that if you ask the proponents of the 1lb/week weight gain whether that will work for your stated goals ("get as strong as possible and put on mass") they would say that their program is not optimized for that, but instead for "general health." You are young, and if you are generally healthy you have the luxury of not having to focus on long-term health, and can have other goals for now, like becoming a monster.

    Rip's not going to tell you how to use RPE or fit veganism into the SSNLP, just like the RPE guys are not going to tell you how to incorporate RPE into the SSNLP or to use GOMAD. If you like the SS approach to novice programming, you should stick with it and study Rip's guidance on nutrition, recovery, and the modifications to make to LP as you move through it. If you really like using RPE to auto-regulate your programming, then you should go do that. Either way, you will get better results than if you switch back and forth because you are uncertain.

    One mediocre plan that you stick with will get better results than switching off between 2-3 brilliant but contradictory plans. This is true for much of life, BTW, not just training.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsiso View Post
    The other opinions I have gotten are from different sources online. I'm reluctant to name people/institutions (but let's say you are familiar with them) but I think they are knowledgable as far as I can tell which is my source of confusion. If they are not lying (I know they are not.) then how come there is such a difference in opinion across the board, in other words how can they be so wrong ? I'm referring to the use of RPE dependent programs and moderate weight gain (1lbs gain per week) etc instead of pushing the weight while gaining strength on LP. The reason I ask you is because I trust you and have gotten results from doing what you are telling in the books. God knows I would have never figured out how to properly squat(ever) if not for the information I have gotten from your content.
    As you continue to do more research in Strength acquisition programs over the centuries it will become quite evident that there are fairly trivial differences in programming approaches. The development and rationale of the SS programs are well documented, but the first written account of the Novice Program might very well be from Milo of Croton 2500 years ago.

    The only values you can manipulate are:
    -frequency
    -speed/time
    -body weight
    -poundage

    Biology insists that adaptions are made incrementally, and the value that can be incrementally and consistently increased over a long period of time is poundage.

    It's not about right or wrong it's about understanding some basic truths about stress-adaption-recovery cycles and then designing a template which 99% of the population could manage without fucking up. If you reread the books and articles closely you will see that nowhere does it require that every person must gain over 1lb per week.

  7. #7
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    Feb 2017
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    Sacramento
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    starting strength coach development program
    I think your already on the right track. I would listen to Mark and head steadily towards 200lbs and see where that takes you. Don't add extra calories with junk, but instead with nutrient dense foods. I wish I could have told my younger self this, as I spun my wheels for years trying to get/keep abs and was basically a weakling despite my hard efforts. If you feel too fluffy at the new bodyweight, keep in mind you want have to cut as much to get "shredded" as you'll be carrying more muscle mass. Losing weight is much easier than gaining strength so go for it while you are young and have fun with the gains train!

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