Video: Why the Trap Bar is Useless Video: Why the Trap Bar is Useless

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Thread: Video: Why the Trap Bar is Useless

  1. #1
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    Default Video: Why the Trap Bar is Useless

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  2. #2
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    I agree with you that the trap bar is a piece of shit.

    But the sagittal plane movement argument is not persuasive. "most muscle mass over useful range of motion" Having to stabilize the sagital plane will require, theoretically, the use of greater muscle mass. We dont recommend the Smith machine for bench press because we want 3 planes f instability and smith machine eliminates two. If deadlift eliminates (sagital) plane of instabuility and trap bar elinates none, doesnt that make trap bar superior? Are squats stable in the sagital plane? Horizontal? frontal? NO. But its still the ideal exercise.

    Again I agree with you that its a a piece of shit exercise (the grip reason is perfect) but the sagital plane argument aint it.


    The argument that trap bar is a standing leg press is a better argument - that it allows for sloppy spinal mechanics is a better argument. that it is irreproduicible is a good one. The grip argument is a good one. That it - unlike the DL - doesnt requires someone to learn how to brace their spine is a good one.

    My 2 cents.

  3. #3
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    I want you to get strong enough to deadlift 600. I want the lockout at 600 to be safe enough that next time you can deadlift 605. The trap bar is probably safe at 405. But 405 isn't heavy. and the difference between 405 and 605 is significant enough that lockout stability must be a consideration. If all you want to do is 405, I understand.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    I want you to get strong enough to deadlift 600. I want the lockout at 600 to be safe enough that next time you can deadlift 605. The trap bar is probably safe at 405. But 405 isn't heavy. and the difference between 405 and 605 is significant enough that lockout stability must be a consideration. If all you want to do is 405, I understand.
    Are there lots of examples available of people being injured doing a trap bar deadlift at a higher frequency than using a barbell? I've used a trap bar during the new ACFT and feel like it's kind of a weird squat where you hold the weight in your hands. But it didn't feel dangerous.

  5. #5
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    Probably not, so go ahead and use the damn thing.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    I want you to get strong enough to deadlift 600. I want the lockout at 600 to be safe enough that next time you can deadlift 605. The trap bar is probably safe at 405. But 405 isn't heavy. and the difference between 405 and 605 is significant enough that lockout stability must be a consideration. If all you want to do is 405, I understand.
    Actually, this is an excellent point. Whats probably fine at lighter loads is probably unsafe (i.e. wobbly) at greater ones, such as 600. I stand corrected. Again. Fuck.

  7. #7
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    Similar concept to high reps. Fine with machines, dumbbells, etc. but not great with barbells.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Santana View Post
    Similar concept to high reps. Fine with machines, dumbbells, etc. but not great with barbells.
    Trap bars lock in the grip width. This lack of adjustability creates problems and limits its usefulness since the stress it imposes on a user can't be modified to accommodate anthropometry, injury, or simply to add exercise variations. This is a big difference between a barbell and a trap bar. Or a trap bar and dumbbells.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by stef View Post
    Trap bars lock in the grip width. This lack of adjustability creates problems and limits its usefulness since the stress it imposes on a user can't be modified to accommodate anthropometry, injury, or simply to add exercise variations. This is a big difference between a barbell and a trap bar. Or a trap bar and dumbbells.
    Lets not pretend its and not an insurmountable task.

    Most Trap bars have two sets of handles for two starting heights/depths.
    (like one pictured in the trash can).

    Another simple modification to stand on a plate turned face down (deficit pull).
    Or deadlift from plates like a block pull.
    Many gyms have blocks or plinths for this as well.

    Most all (99%) of the barbell deadlift variations revolve around:
    - different grip widths
    - pulling from a deficit (see grip width) or a block/rack pull.

  10. #10
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    Another problem: setting up for a deadlift is easy, because the bar markings are next to your legs. With a trap bar, one has to guesstimate.

    I think the sagittal instability is more of a problem during the pull than at the top. Even though the neutral grip is stronger, the trap bar has a marked tendency to roll forward or backward out of one's hands.

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