COVID19 Factors We Should Consider/Current Events COVID19 Factors We Should Consider/Current Events - Page 1372

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Thread: COVID19 Factors We Should Consider/Current Events

  1. #13711
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Grantham View Post
    As I said, I'm not claiming that everything was done correctly. I'm aware of the issues with some health-related facilities, nursing homes especially.
    The data are simply unconvincing that this can be used as an effective prophylactic for at risk populations. Most of the studies are small, and do not even show enough of a protective effect to be relied on as the only line of defense. Of course you know this, but for the benefit of other folks...in vitro (lab-based) studies are only useful to give you a starting point for what might working a person. All sorts of compounds work fantastically in the lab, but are completely useless in people. Mouse studies are only slightly more useful. Even if we had the data available now in March of 2020, I still would not be convinced that this is sufficient to serve as the sole line of protection for populations that are at risk for severe disease. We didn't have those data. There may have been rumblings about some of this, but enough to rely on prophylaxis as the sole line of defense while transmission (and therefore potential exposure events for vulnerable populations) increases throughout the rest of the population?

    And no, Rip...I'm not a hospital administrator. Just a virologist. I'm sure that will give folks plenty of reason to throw rocks, but such is life on the internet.
    Wait a minute.

    Take two choices A and B. A has preliminary studies that support it, a number of case studies showing that it worked (the difference between an anecdote and a case study being whether someone with an advanced degree likes the result) and a good theoretical basis, but not as much proof of effectiveness as we'd like in an ideal world. B has no studies to support it, doesn't seem to be working in practice and has horrific side effects for both individuals and society. Why is your immediate reaction that we have to choose B? If I can't prove that ibuprofen is the best thing for my muscle ache to the right degree of statistical significance, should I set my head on fire instead?

  2. #13712
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Grantham View Post
    And no, Rip...I'm not a hospital administrator. Just a virologist. I'm sure that will give folks plenty of reason to throw rocks, but such is life on the internet.
    This is a question I've been wanting to ask someone in the field since the beginning. Remember in February or March of last year when Fauci said, "There's no real need to wear masks right now. Most of the transmissions are believed to have come from surface contact." I remember it clearly on 60 Minutes in March of 2020, two months after he stated that COVID-19 wasn't a big deal.

    My question is: how many viruses that cause respiratory diseases use surface contact as a primary transmission vector? I don't mean to sound flippant.... Well, maybe just a bit... But, I learned this stuff in 6th grade science class. We had the nation's top infectious disease specialist telling us not to stick our hands in goo and lick our fingers or poke our eyes because that's how the world was going to come to an end. When you look at the man's history of being a foolish clown, this is one part that gets glossed over quickly. I anticipate that you'll fall back on, "That was where the evidence led us at the time," but that's a shitty excuse and a complete failure to think with just the slightest bit of common sense.

    I do believe that the scientific method, applied properly, will yield the most correct answers over time. That said, sometimes it takes a very long time (think of advances in physics from Newton to Einstein), and in a situation that requires answers, sometimes common sense and anecdote is a better solution to getting things done.

  3. #13713
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  4. #13714
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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Rowe View Post
    Not to mention you could always sit outside on the porch and sip sweet tea with her in the sun during the next pandemic or endemic threat. Go for a walk in the sunlight. Give her a hug before she goes back in. Actually, now I think it casts a dark light on how we treat the elderly, anyway. Perhaps those in nursing care, especially hospice, should get a garden instead of a TV in a community room to sit in. I've often thought about visiting those in the homes here, but I wouldn't be able to get through the prison-esque front doors to see them, anyhow.
    Forgive me if this sounds callous and insensitive. My mother died in a nursing home during this thing. I was not able to see her as she passed because the nursing home could not allow visitors. I am ok with all of that. Here’s why.

    She was in that place for a few months before they closed for visitors. I was able to observe the population and the staff as well as the obscene amount of drugs distributed on the medical carts almost nonstop which kept many of them alive for the next 12 hours. These are elderly people with a medical baseline which on their best day is hell. On a normal day hey exist not far from death, their homeostasis is just waiting to be interrupted by anything which would push them into the great beyond. If that sounds like an exaggeration, come with me and we will visit one of these places.

    And it would not take much for many in that place to pass away over a 24 hour period: the air conditioning failure, etc.
    In summary, I do not blame coronavirus. If it wasn’t that, it would have been anything. I am afraid as a society we have become way too fragile, we pretend that death is something that occurs only in the movies.

    So yes, protect Grandma but let the rest of us healthy adults go on with our lives. Let the kids go to school.
    And let us not forget that grandma’s time with us even under the best conditions would be very limited.

    I was one of those people who said that I would never let my mother go into a nursing home. But shit happens. If you find yourself facing that difficult decision, it may be the worst day of your life. So David, your are 100% correct.

  5. #13715
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  6. #13716
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Grantham View Post
    As I said, I'm not claiming that everything was done correctly. I'm aware of the issues with some health-related facilities, nursing homes especially.
    The data are simply unconvincing that this can be used as an effective prophylactic for at risk populations. Most of the studies are small, and do not even show enough of a protective effect to be relied on as the only line of defense. Of course you know this, but for the benefit of other folks...in vitro (lab-based) studies are only useful to give you a starting point for what might working a person. All sorts of compounds work fantastically in the lab, but are completely useless in people. Mouse studies are only slightly more useful. Even if we had the data available now in March of 2020, I still would not be convinced that this is sufficient to serve as the sole line of protection for populations that are at risk for severe disease. We didn't have those data. There may have been rumblings about some of this, but enough to rely on prophylaxis as the sole line of defense while transmission (and therefore potential exposure events for vulnerable populations) increases throughout the rest of the population?
    Do you actually believe that ivermectin, a drug with a safety profile and long history of use over billions of doses, one of the safest and most widely prescribed medications in the world's pharmacopoeia for the past 50 years, safer than aspirin, should not be used for prophylaxis for COVID-19 because "the data are unconvincing"? When you have not looked at the data? You're teaching us quite a bit, doctor.

  7. #13717
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Grantham View Post
    The data are simply unconvincing that this can be used as an effective prophylactic for at risk populations. Most of the studies are small, and do not even show enough of a protective effect to be relied on as the only line of defense.
    Only a professional researcher thinks it is reasonable or prudent to wait 30 years for large scale clinical trials. People take action, even some in the medical industry do this. It is a far lower risk drug than baby aspirin and everyone would damn sure have been taking baby aspirin if it had even a hint of efficacy. IVR works better in the field than approved antivirals. More and more people are seeing this as they test things out on other viral diseases/symptoms.

    "Sorry you're dead, we couldn't be bothered to try low risk, widely available, inexpensive outpatient treatments. Goodbye and thanks for all the $$$!" is what we have from the authoritarians. Not only that, they actively worked against anyone even trying things from NAC to IVR to HCQ to vitamins to everything in between. These were suppressed by the Media and by medical authorities and by social media. Total fuckery.

    See also: Ivermectin for Prevention and Treatment of COVID-19 Infection

    And no, it was never the "only line of defense" -- hydroxychloroquine as even mentioned right there above, corticosteroids, vitamins D and C and etc etc etc. Don't play games.

  8. #13718
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    Why Has "Ivermectin" Become a Dirty Word? - TK News by Matt Taibbi

    Why has ivermectin become a dirty word? Because of Michael Grantham and his colleagues. Their motivations are a matter for debate, but you can choose between pigheadedness and the money, with the likelihood of money increasing with proximity to pharmaceutical company BODs. Michael is probably just pigheaded.

    Those of you who wore The Mask out of genuine fear of the deadly SARS Cov2 virus and not just as a virtue-signalling/obedience-signalling device, would you have taken a monthly prophylactic dose of ivermectin instead? You give it to your best friend in the world, and he's just fine. Surely that option should have been offered to you, but remdesivir and these ridiculous "vaccines" are the only options you're even allowed to discuss.

    It's the money. My god, that's where we've been for a year.

  9. #13719
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    God bless these doctors being and acting like doctors should. Actually trying to figure out a solution to a problem using the skill set that they studied many years for to attain and perfect.
    The FLCCC Weekly Update, for June 16, 2021?The I-RECOVER Protocol for Long Haul Covid Syndrome? - YouTube

  10. #13720
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    Quote Originally Posted by gilead View Post

    I'm confused by that last eyeglass demonstration.
    Is humidity a suspended vapor?
    Or, in humid air, is H2O in the air dissolved similarly to how salt and sugar are dissolved in water, or is it similar to a particulate suspension that can be filtered, as corn starch in water?
    It looks like a demonstration of condensation of humid air.
    Is there a process by which humidity can be filtered from the air using particulate filters, without using a cooler surface relative to warmer humid air?

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