COVID19 Factors We Should Consider/Current Events COVID19 Factors We Should Consider/Current Events - Page 1404

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Thread: COVID19 Factors We Should Consider/Current Events

  1. #14031
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    • starting strength seminar december 2022
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Grantham View Post
    I'm not aware of any vaccine that has adverse effects that appear years later. There is no biological reason for me to believe that these vaccines will be any different than any of the others in that respect.
    During the Gulf War, service members were ordered to take an unapproved vaccine. Thousands of them suffer from unexplained health problems with the common denominator being they all got the vaccine.

  2. #14032
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    Quote Originally Posted by wal View Post
    Global warming causes building collapse.

    Biden's Energy Secretary Blames Surfside Collapse on Global Warming | Frontpagemag

    How do these folk get these government jobs?
    For perspective , the Department of Energy, started as the Atomic Energy Commission, an extension of the Manhattan project, i.e. nuclear weapons. Later, in the late 70s during the energy crisis, it was turned into an executive branch and called the Department of Energy.

    It’s primary mission is still the control and the science of nuclear weapons and materials, although other energy and security related topics have taken bigger roles over the years.

    As such, the Secretary of Energy is often a top scientist in fundamental and or nuclear science. In some years, depending on the political environment or external issues, the secretary has a background in general energy or other administrative experience.

    The National Laboratory system, created by the Atomic Energy Act of 1946, is run by the Department of Energy. Interestingly, the Labs and their employees are not Federal employees (civil servants), they are contractors. This structure was insisted upon by Oppenheimer himself, as he knew it would be required to get and sustain a scientific prestige that looked more academic than bureaucratic.

    However, the Department of Energy and it’s employees are civil servants and answer to the executive branch.

  3. #14033
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    https://twitter.com/realchrisrufo/st...73898491678720

    "BREAKING: The nation's largest teachers union has approved a plan to promote critical race theory in all 50 states and 14,000 local school districts.

    The argument that "critical race theory isn't in K-12 schools" is officially dead."

    We do not live in a liberal democracy, or an open society, according to the definition of those things.

  4. #14034
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    Quote Originally Posted by wal View Post
    Global warming causes building collapse.

    Biden's Energy Secretary Blames Surfside Collapse on Global Warming | Frontpagemag

    How do these folk get these government jobs?

    That would be a good defense when the litigation comes up, no need to explain the reinforcing was underrated and the footings were not built according to the engineering specs, or the concrete was not the right compressive strength, no the defense will say, the building deterioration was accelerated by the ingress of sea water causing a failure of the building's footings due to rising water tables directly caused by global warming of the oceans.
    The federal government would prefer its employees to perform at 80% rather than 120% of what is expected for their position. If they perform at 120%, well then they would deserve raises, wouldn't they? It's not in the budget this year. During the Obama years and Sequestration for the DoD, they were passing out $500-$1200 bonuses in the high payband tiers for the "top performers" and high-fiving them like that was amazing. I had a very good friend who did, quite literally, 240% of what his job required, and he was told by the supervisor when he received low evaluations that it was due to him being new -- and that if money was just that important to him, well, he could go become a contractor. So he did, and they begged him to stay, but he threw up deuces and was gone. A lot of talent and 100-120%'ers left over the years, and only the button pushers, those close to retirement, and those with a sense of duty and patriotism (usually prior-service military) remained behind. Under Trump, the military was revitalized and pay for both civilians and military improved, but the stagnation and damage was done. The Boomer retirement wave was still heavily in effect, and the civilian sector (not DoD contracting, mind you... purely unrelated to the government, old-fashioned private sector) had exploded in the interim. Capable and talented people were able to double and triple their salaries in some cases, but certainly could see $20,000+ pay raises by going to private sector jobs. After the last year and a half, we've seen many of those jobs grow into permanent telework positions allowing people to make good money virtually anywhere, and the government has like-wise become institutionally hostile to the patriotic. All that remains are the few who are close to retirement, button pushers, and only the smallest handful of patriots who are too stubborn to surrender. I think, though, that they are such a minority that they no longer have the numbers to right the ship in the way they used to...

    So, really, button pushers are the rank-and-file, now. It's probably the same way in larger urban police forces, and may be so in industries we haven't even considered. Button pushers are loved by the government, because they won't question much so long as the button gets pushed and they get their direct deposit, but the government also won't have to give them meaningful promotions beyond when they top-out on their payband.

    Perhaps the worst part is the emptying of the military, conventional and in special operations, of the qualified combat arms personnel. They're mostly extremists according to the current administration.

  5. #14035
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    More on this evil stench. I personally couldn't even get through a quarter of this reel it's just too scary https://twitter.com/Bobby_Network/st...01521579266049

    Fauci 2012 https://twitter.com/Bobby_Network/st...94422161510402

    A little bit of a marketing course https://twitter.com/EaEmpowerSocial/...19037255573510

    and what happens when if everyone is vaccinated, there is essentially no control group. Oh well, you can't prove anything. https://twitter.com/AdamDiscovers/st...99795616030724

  6. #14036
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    Army preparing for mandatory COVID-19 vaccines by September, report says

    I'm more surprised by the buried headline that the FDA has the audacity to try and fully approve this thing by September 1.

  7. #14037
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenni View Post
    Look, this is not a hill I'm gonna die on. I may be wrong. I do recall the Pinkertons. I also recall that the very start of the police was to hunt down escaped slaves. I also think that Jocko Willink (and others like him) needs to be put in control of police training no matter which way it goes. But here's the thing- I don't cause shit. I don't go around stealing or starting fights. But even I have had abysmal interactions with the police. I've also had the misfortune to try to befriend one and found out what a rotten human being he really was. I've heard and seen police actions time and time again that were so wrong. And don't get me started on corrections officers. My mind is open to there being good cops. I trust Rip if he says the WF police have acted decently. But I've never personally interacted with a police officer who wasn't a total asshat. I see that as a function of who they serve-who hired them. They don't actually answer to us citizens. They answer to the politicians. And I think changing that might be a good way to reign in their power.
    I want to preface this by saying I didn't know a whole lot about policing a year ago, and that was with multiple friends in the profession. I have learned a tremendous amount, and I was wrong about a lot of it. I could only learn those lessons by doing it. I also thought that my military and federal service would have set me up for success, and for a few parts of the job I was over-prepared for. There was a LOT that I was not prepared for or qualified on out-of-the-gate, and the amount of certifications I needed to even be certified as an officer at a basic police level were kind of shocking. I was also only afforded a period of time similar to basic training in the military to be taught, trained and certified on them all together. I'm not bashing you in the slightest, or your ideas for that matter. I'm just trying to get across that the issues are deeply systemic beyond just the police agencies. It's political AND social, and all I can do as an individual officer, rookie that I am, is try to do my best on daily interactions. In a way, I selfishly enjoy seeing people calm down in a bad situation, tell me thank you after I've helped them start the process of addressing a crime against them through a report, or on the very rare occasion even getting a hug or a handshake from someone I've helped. It's all little deposits into the emotional bank account, and there are a lot of withdrawals (usually pretty big ones) on a daily basis. Had I not been previously stress/fear inoculated and experienced horrible sides of humanity to the point where I could make my peace with it, then I would likely already be sliding down into a bad place mentally and spiritually over this job. None of this is an excuse. I often like to phrase it as "there's not always a justification when a situation goes bad, but there's usually an explanation." It is my goal to dig down to the absolute root causes and find solutions to THOSE problems. Maybe some police agencies need to be emptied-out or even disbanded -- that's going to be on a case-by-case basis.

    I am legitimately sorry for those you've dealt with, but there's little that I can do about it beyond try to do better. It's the same way for every other officer or agent. We don't like the bad apples, either.

    Also, side-note: policing didn't start with slaves. It was a tradition already prevalent in Europe and elsewhere for centuries (millennia, even), and revitalized in the colonies. I believe the first American examples were the "Rattle Watch." Slave trackers may have been a regional thing, but they certainly were not the first.

    ALSO, Jocko Willink is a great man, but his experience with policing was likely not much different than mine used to be. It's not that I don't welcome his suggestions -- I do. I agree with the underlying premises of a lot of his ideas and assertions, but then there's reality. Those ideas need a lot more refinement and work to get to a point where they could be usefully implemented, and even then they're likely prohibitively expensive with the way things are. Reform is expensive, and usually needs to be very large in scope to have a meaningful, or even noticeable, impact.


    Quote Originally Posted by Jenni View Post
    It's automatically a fraught thing. Pretending that someone has the right to control another's behavior. We shouldn't do it lightly. It should only be done for the protection of rights. Right now we have way too many wolves with that power and not enough sheep dogs. I'm not sure this is going to change under current voting circumstances because a lot of these people voting don't actually have a dog in the fight. I don't really give a shit what illegal immigrants and college students think. They aren't forming ties in my community. They aren't buying property and starting businesses and generally putting down roots here. But they get a say in this shit anyway. There's no way to hold people accountable under these circumstances. Never mind the enormous amounts of money in politics which dictates what the politicians do which then dictates what the cops do. We've all seen this as this pandemic has gone on. If the cops were privatized would Atlas Gym be fighting its legal battle? Would LA restaurants have had to watch as they closed up while the rich were hosting all kinds of parties?
    I agree. We spent a lot of time on Constitutional Law in the academy -- an entire week, which is a ridiculous block of time compared to everything else. We only were afforded that much time for pistol range and defense tactics, by comparison. Perhaps the most surprising part, for me, was learning that the Bill of Rights was no longer absolute, but, instead of politicians and police treading on rights, it was the courts who slowly made allowances through case law and supreme court decisions over the decades. It's also funny you mention the wolves/sheep dogs thing as it's a common idea. It has been heavy on my mind and heart lately that we don't need sheep dogs, either -- we need shepherds. Not just in policing, though, in every social and political institution. In our families. We need people who are capable but humble, strong but able to be gentle, and who live and speak Truth as unwaveringly as possible. I think that this community built around strength training has a very deep connection with that sort of person, and I haven't figured it out yet. I think it has something to do with strength training being an endeavor that is necessarily face-to-face with the nature of reality, and it's also suffering in the correct way -- for a purpose.

    My body of posts in this thread represents my early conclusions on what must be done. It likely will change over time, and it will also be unavoidably biased towards what's happening in my city, county and state. I just hope everyone possesses the resolve and character to see what will be years, if not decades, of slow improvements on both long-standing issues and whatever comes up while we're fixing it.


    Quote Originally Posted by Jenni View Post
    More and more private police is taking a role, whether we agree with it or not. Unions and pensions are where the money is going which means that department after department is closing and shifting the burden. Camden, Sacramento, Millbrea. Good luck getting a cop to respond to a burglary call. Same here. The other day when I went to the corner store the lady had closed it up because some shit went down and she got hurt. She was waiting on the cops while still bleeding because the ambulance wouldn't come till the cops cleared them and the cops hadn't shown up yet even though the precinct is in walking distance. I had to drive down to the precinct (cuz it's hot and I'm lazy) and bitch at them to come see about it. Yet, the neighborhood association pays a security company to patrol the neighborhood. Guess whose patrol car I see more often? I see no way in which my current safety situation is improved by the police. Or hers. This scenario is repeated in neighborhoods everywhere. More and more it's the private firms taking care of people's needs. When Whole Foods came to Jackson (not that I'm a fan but it was a big deal to win the contract) guess where they went? To the Highland Village area where the security is. South Jackson which relies on the police hasn't seen a new grocery store in over a decade and the ones that were there have left. It's practically a wasteland of payday loan places and small corner stores with short Indian men behind glass. So no, I'm not sure that privatization is the answer but I don't think "holding politicians accountable" is possible even with civic engagement. I don't think we can out-money the corporations to pull the political loyalty back to us.
    I think I've already covered much of this point, but I do think you hit on something important -- the money issue. It will need to be changed to be a start towards fixing agencies, but there's far more that's required. People are going to have to start doing things beyond just what makes economic sense. People, and I mean everybody, are going to have to start acting out of civic duty and moral imperative, again. Otherwise, any solutions to any problems, not simply policing, are likely going to be insufficient to what we face.

  8. #14038
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    Quote Originally Posted by gilead View Post
    So do you want to guess how many days it took before this study was retracted? Published on the 24th of June 2021 and retracted on the 2nd of July

  9. #14039
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Grantham View Post
    This is a fair point and more data is needed to sort out the magnitude of these risks for sure. Finding 9 symptomatic cases out of 2810 raises the possibility that the risk during infection is not trivial though.
    What is the baseline incidence of chest pain among collegiate athletes? When they exhibit LGE, how often is it at the right ventricular insertion point?

  10. #14040
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    starting strength coach development program
    Michael Levitt
    UK reported COVID-19 Cases/Death, CFR, is 1200 - 400 as delay from case to death varies from 0 to 30 days.
    Maximum IFR 0.08 to 0.25%.
    UK E&W excess death to week 15 or 23 negative for all & noisy for ages 15-64.
    Good news!
    Delta variant seems weak.
    Is it a natural vaccine? https://twitter.com/MLevitt_NP2013/status/1411523352984838148/photo/1


    Whistleblowing GP’s Letter to Sir Simon Stevens – Covid19 Assembly
    Following the suspension of Hampshire GP Doctor Sam White by NHS England for publicly questioning Covid protocols, his solicitors Philip Hyland of PJH Law have fired off the following letter to Sir Simon Stevens, Chief Executive Officer of NHS England. The letter lays out accusations of unlawful actions by NHS executives, HM Government, SAGE, MHRA and other authorities.

    This is huge, a must read for anyone who finds themselves in any way threatened by any public body over any aspect of the Covid crisis.

    The Covid19 Assembly recently launched “Speak Out” a whistleblowing service to help give a platform and legal protection (through PJH Law) to those wishing to come forward with information or opinions on the government’s response to Coronavirus.

    CEO of the Covid19 Assembly, David Fleming, says: “We welcome this letter from Doctor Sam White and PJH Law and hope it encourages other doctors and medical professionals to come forward. “Speak Out” will do everything we can to ensure that such bravery is rewarded with the best legal advice possible at no cost.” *

    Please click on the link below to see the full letter.

    Letter to Sir Simon Stevens
    https://www.covid19assembly.org/wp-c...on-Stevens.pdf

    Can anyone look into this data to see if it is legit and if there is a pattern in other parts of the world.
    Fully vaccinated people have a 885% higher chance of death due to Covid-19 than people who are unvaccinated according to official data – Daily Expose

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