COVID19 Factors We Should Consider/Current Events COVID19 Factors We Should Consider/Current Events - Page 1617

starting strength gym
Page 1617 of 1752 FirstFirst ... 617111715171567160716151616161716181619162716671717 ... LastLast
Results 16,161 to 16,170 of 17514

Thread: COVID19 Factors We Should Consider/Current Events

  1. #16161
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Los Alamos, NM
    Posts
    2,466

    Default

    • starting strength seminar december 2021
    • starting strength seminar february 2022
    • starting strength seminar april 2022
    Quote Originally Posted by Kitsuma View Post

    But, the scariest part is there still exist brilliant, accomplished people who are in denial regarding this war...and instead point to things like political correctness to dismiss intention.

    And Barry, it's standardized across the country...and much of the globe. But this isn't war?
    Letís break this down a bit and use simpler general terms. I think it will be easier and more fun. The claim is we are at war. For the sake of brevity we both understand what ďthe warĒ is. You claim we are at war and I claim there isnít sufficient evidence to claim war. (This is not the same as denial).

    Agreed? If not, letís straighten that out first.

  2. #16162
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    386

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by giampierod View Post
    If ICUs fill, then those without covid that need that space will die. And once the ICUS are full, the collateral deaths go exponential
    It is high time that this risk is examined and quantified, because so far we have been relying on...

    (see Queue theory).
    ...egregiously wrong ideas of what an ICU is, what capacity they possess, what admittance means, etc - which have already caused tremendous collateral deaths, in nursing homes and elsewhere.

    There was a point in the pandemic where Ontario was skirting with the idea of "triage" rules, that basically required doctors to choose who gets care based on their overall longterm death risk. I guess Trump had a good idea when he sent that ship to NY and built temporary ICU capacity.
    Few or no patients even skirted (sic) with entering those facilities.

  3. #16163
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    1,053

  4. #16164
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Posts
    1,483

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by giampierod View Post
    I guess Trump had a good idea when he sent that ship to NY and built temporary ICU capacity.
    Too bad New York quickly fucked it up and sent COVID patients there. The whole point was to have it be isolated from COVID exposure so non-COVIDs could go there.

    Am I missing something? Do you have a better alternative? If all options are bad, do you just take the principle of most freedom wins? What's your thoughts? I clearly don't have a good answer.
    I mean...yes, that is exactly how to look at it. If all the options suck, then the one that is the least sucky wins. The one that lets people continue living their lives as they see fit is the least sucky. Does this require a lot of thinking out?

  5. #16165
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    1,053

    Default

    A very interesting discussion!
    Meeting of the COVID-19 Giants with Geert Vanden Bossche and Robert Malone MD | Vejon Health
    Tremendous privilege for me to host the first live discussion between two stalwarts in the COVID-19 pandemic. Both men have taken an ethical stand to focus on science and not be afraid to share their expertise.

    The world now stands at a crossroads again. Where do we plant our next step?

    Geert Vanden Bossche - Expert vaccine developer (Belgium)
    Robert Malone MD - Inventor of mRNA vaccines (USA)

  6. #16166
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Jackson, MS
    Posts
    199

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by giampierod View Post
    I guess if there are no other good options to prevent ICU overruns, then yes I am pro lockdown.
    Funny how they closed a shit ton of hospitals just prior to all this. 2019 was worst year for US rural hospital closures in a decade, report finds | US news | The Guardian Probably helped a lot in the whole "ICUs over-run" claim. Also, the ship wasn't to build ICU capacity. They had 15 to 20 patients on them. There was a list of 49 conditions that would prevent patients from going aboard- including Covid.

  7. #16167
    Join Date
    Dec 2020
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    That was a good one. The author does a great job on some things and kind of jumps to conclusions on others. I'll go through his summary points:

    COVID-19 is a blood and blood vessel disease. SARS-CoV-2 infects the lining of human blood vessels, causing them to leak into the lungs.
    I won't go through all the data the author cites. But it is vast and compelling. He definitely makes a great case for why covid is freaking scary if you happen to roll the dice poorly in your viral response. And it is clear from his evidence that it can cause downstream effects that are quite bad. It's like covid knocks out a portion of the foundation, but not enough to topple it right away. Then a bird lands on the roof and the whole thing collapses.

    Current treatment protocols (e.g. invasive ventilation) are actively harmful to patients, accelerating oxidative stress and causing severe VILI (ventilator-induced lung injuries). The continued use of ventilators in the absence of any proven medical benefit constitutes mass murder.
    Yup, you can look at the first wave to see this in action. Lots of ventilation, lots of deaths.

    Existing countermeasures are inadequate to slow the spread of what is an aerosolized and potentially wastewater-borne virus, and constitute a form of medical theater.
    If you look at his evidence, he is talking specifically about masks, physical distancing, and hand sanitization. He makes no case against lockdowns. In fact his explanation of the aerosol nature of covid means that pretty much anything short of a lockdown won't do anything. I think the evidence kind of supports this. The only time Ontario saw the R(t) of covid turn downward prior to vaccination was during stay-at-home orders. Masking with cloth masks and physical distancing at 6ft is likely useless.

    Various non-vaccine interventions have been suppressed by both the media and the medical establishment in favor of vaccines and expensive patented drugs.
    Yup. I would agree with this too. HCQ should have gotten a fair shake and so should Ivermectin and NAC. A serious illness should be all hands on deck to figure out a reliable therapy. Profiteering doesn't help people get better.

    The authorities have denied the usefulness of natural immunity against COVID-19, despite the fact that natural immunity confers protection against all of the virus’s proteins, and not just one.
    Also agree with this. If a 2 dose vaccine works so well, then how can 1 or 2 weeks straight of viral load not confer the same or better immunity?

    Vaccines will do more harm than good. The antigen that these vaccines are based on, SARS-CoV-
    2 Spike, is a toxic protein. SARS-CoV-2 may have ADE, or antibody-dependent enhancement; current antibodies may not neutralize future strains, but instead help them infect immune cells. Also, vaccinating during a pandemic with a leaky vaccine removes the evolutionary pressure for a virus to become less lethal.
    He makes a rhetorically good case, but uses a study on the virus itself as evidence (SARS-CoV-2 RNA reverse-transcribed and integrated into the human genome - PubMed) and then he follows it with two opinion pieces. One of those opinion pieces was someone reviewing the same study. So, from his own evidence, the virus itself can potentially attach to DNA and cause a permanent change. Sure, I'll take that on the face of it without a question. It literally says nothing about the vaccine at all. Does the vaccine work the same as the virus in this case? Does it work better? Is it worse? None of that is any of the data he cites for this point.

    And he makes one particular point on vaccine danger that is really strange:

    In mice immunized against SARS-CoV and challenged with the virus, a close relative of SARS-CoV-2, they developed immune sensitization, Th2 immunopathology, and eosinophil infiltration in their lungs.
    The study he cites for this has no mRNA vaccines in it (Immunization with SARS Coronavirus Vaccines Leads to Pulmonary Immunopathology on Challenge with the SARS Virus). There are other synthetic "spike protein" vaccines in it, but the mRNA vaccines we have now are not in that study. Also, it is a mouse model. We have enough people vaccinated now that we can see whether these effects appear in humans or not. The entire study design was 60 days. There have been a lot of people who have had their second shot more than 60 days ago. And many of those vaccinated people are now being infected. If this pathology was present, then it must be so mild that it has no major effect on most people.

    I can't speak too much to the criminal conspiracy stuff. I think that Fauci lied and this thing was built in a lab. Rand Paul made a compelling argument and I think he is right.

  8. #16168
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Posts
    869

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by giampierod View Post
    I guess if there are no other good options to prevent ICU overruns, then yes I am pro lockdown. And I prefer that over vaccine mandates, which is being posed as the alternative. But both of these options suck.

    Doing nothing also seemed incorrect at the beginning (not now). If ICUs fill, then those without covid that need that space will die. And once the ICUS are full, the collateral deaths go exponential (see Queue theory). There was a point in the pandemic where Ontario was skirting with the idea of "triage" rules, that basically required doctors to choose who gets care based on their overall longterm death risk. I guess Trump had a good idea when he sent that ship to NY and built temporary ICU capacity. Something like this was never even discussed in Canada. I am not sure if our tiny army could have pulled it off at a national scale if the country had just let the virus rampant without any lockdowns.

    Am I missing something? Do you have a better alternative? If all options are bad, do you just take the principle of most freedom wins? What's your thoughts? I clearly don't have a good answer.
    Great, see how easy it is to say? I'm anti lockdown, no matter the situation.

  9. #16169
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Posts
    869

    Default

    Btw, for all the Trump fans, not only did he not drain the swamp, he added some alligators: "Fill The Swamp": The Federal Administrative State Grew Even Under Trump | ZeroHedge
    They are all the same.

    @IPB - appoiniting an unelected governor is a coup, I don't care that it can be wiggled through the rotten courts.

  10. #16170
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    1,053

    Default

    starting strength coach development program
    Jeremy Chardy: I regret getting vaccinated, I have series of problems now

    Time to assume that health research is fraudulent until proven otherwise? - The BMJ

    Telegram: Contact @AnthonyColpo
    Monday morning on LaTrobe street, Melbourne, Australia, and when it's not police enforcing tyranny, people queueing for food hand outs, it all looks a lot like communism down under.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •