COVID19 Factors We Should Consider/Current Events COVID19 Factors We Should Consider/Current Events - Page 1919

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Thread: COVID19 Factors We Should Consider/Current Events

  1. #19181
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    • starting strength seminar october 2022
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    Dr Mobeen did say several months ago that his wife was experiencing pain in her joints. He just announced that his wife had Bellís palsy and was severely injured from the vaccine. This must have been a huge blow for Dr Mobeen as he was so excited for these vaccines. This man is extremely learned and I do appreciate his intellectual honesty even though he is incredibly naive.
    Shining some light on the vaccine injured

  2. #19182
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Laureys View Post
    Jovan you've been singing this tune since LAST February, at least.
    I have not, I only sang it in the summer of 2020. It is not beneficial to end the madness, but they no longer have the money for it. They stole everything.

  3. #19183
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    Yup, this "hinting" has nothing to do with the truckers or any fringe minority that's for sure!
    Health officials are hinting at ending COVID restrictions (and not because of the truckers) | Toronto Sun

    Barry,
    You have made me notice and come to realize what a powerful tool PC is. It just stops any type of debate in it's tracks. It's a political trump card for the side that has it on their side.
    It forces many good people no matter how learned or credible they are, to start the argument from a position of weakness and apology. To the extent that even if you question obvious contradictions to all, you are outcasted and considered extreme which closes the debate prematurely.
    Have you or anyone else here thought of any way of overcoming this powerful weopon of silencing opposition?

  4. #19184
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    Quote Originally Posted by Subby View Post
    My theory of this is that this is because "conservatism" is not a political strategy at all, when compared to "progressivism"...
    That is a good observation I have overlooked.
    I am struggling to come up with any ideology the conservatives really believe in.
    I guess it's easy to be spineless when you never had any convictions in the first place.
    We know how they operate. It's manufactured consensus as an attempt to convince certain groups they are going against the herd or to blackpill them into feeling weak or hopeless.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jovan Dragisic View Post
    I agree. I think the only reason why you don't have many more dead bodies is because everybody has been lying about how many people got the vaccines. If any country actually had 90 percent of the population vaccinated, you would have a major death party.
    Very reasonable assumption; I feel like I have seen a 60% vaccination claim by media/politicians in many regions for around 6 months now.
    ----------------

    I won't go into the Bitcoin anymore, as there are detailed resources out there.
    Most of the dissenting views remind me of the old 1950s claims that useful computers in the year 2000 would take up 10,000 square feet of space and only be affordable to the five wealthiest Saudi kings.

  5. #19185
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    Quote Originally Posted by giampierod View Post
    About 10 years ago I got deep into cryptocurrency. I bought a mining rig and mined about 500K dogecoin (No, I don't have them anymore). And questions like yours really had me in a logical dilemma. I couldn't wrap my head around the contradictions. I am open to opinions here, but this is what I couldn't reconcile in my head.

    There are 2 core use cases for cryptocurrency. As a store of value (Bitcoin, Litecoin, etc) or as a proof of contract/NFT (Ethereum)

    So let's start with the first use case as a store of value:
    Fiat currency is called fiat because it doesn't count anything but itself and thus has no intrinsic value. This is also true of all cryptocurrencies, they don't count anything but themselves and their entire value is based on belief of value. So really they are just fiat currencies with different controllers.

    Cryptocurrency have no intrinsic scarcity by the technology itself. You can have an inflationary cryptocurrency or a fixed pool. For example, dogecoin is inflationary and bitcoin is a fixed pool. In principle the logic goes that since these coins are either low inflation or no inflation they behave more like commodities such as gold and silver. But in practice they have fundamental differences. Commodities are physical goods that will continue to exist in material form regardless of ownership. Even a vault of gold will always be in the same place, full of gold, whether you have the key or not. Cryptocurrencies can vanish when someone loses their key to the wallet or loses the wallet file itself. That means that the total supply of the Bitcoin is decreasing as people lose wallets or lose control of their wallets. And this is a "gone forever" kind of deal. Evidence of this is someone who has been searching a garbage dump for years for a hard drive that has his bitcoin wallet worth millions on it. This consolidates the value into the hands of a few people who got in early and held on. There isn't enough supply of bitcoins left for everyone else. So for people who are not tech savvy, don't have good backup strategies, or are not good with password management they will likely get screwed. UNLESS, they put their money into a crypto exchange who shares the keys with you to the wallet and also take a cut of every transaction made from your account. They see every transaction and can track it. Basically a bank just like any other. And you might think that you can avoid one of these things, but if you ever want to purchase something with bitcoin the clearing time of a transaction is, on average, 10 minutes but can be an hour. You are not going to wait 10 minutes for every customer in a restaurant to clear their transactions. It would slow down turnaround and profits. In 10 minutes the stock market makes millions (billions?) of trades. When you try to do anything with Bitcoin that is outside of just a storage of money you almost always have to translate it to some other currency (likely fiat), to actually do something with it. And you need a crypto exchange to accomplish that. So basically, anything practical you want to do with Bitcoin requires a bank of some kind.

    And, no matter how bad it is, fiat money has 1 major technical advantage. It can be created out of thin air. Sometimes banks lose a bunch of money or lose access to it because of computer issues. With constant cheque-clearing (because that's how US banks still work) and fractional reserve banking, any significant limitation in access to money from any of the big banks can completely stop the economy from moving. However, for a short period of time, the central bank can loan money to the big bank until they fix their issues. This money is made out of thin air. Now imagine a large crypto exchange suddenly "losing" access to a bunch of wallets. That's it, they are gone and every person who is affected is just screwed. No recourse, no fixing it. No amount of lawsuits will get those Bitcoins back (because no on has them).

    So bitcoin has the scarcity of commodities without the permanence and has the value assignment of fiat currency without the ability to generate liquidity on demand. It seems like it took the worst parts of both mediums of exchange.

    The second major use case is proof of contract or NFTs

    In this case we use the cryptocurrency as a token that guarantees a transaction has occurred. This verified by the blockchain and, mathematically, it is a very robust system. But in this use case, the value of token should be as close to 0 as possible. Because the value of the token is additive cost to the transaction you want to promote lots of transactions. Further, the transaction should close as quickly as possible to promote more transactions. This is a high-volume, low-margin game for the cryptocurrency. Tokens are created out of thin air and are counting things that are not themselves. The only winner for the small value of the cryptocurrency is the minter of the currency. NFT exchanges, Ethereum foundation, etc. No one else will make money on this.

    I haven't even touched things like energy costs of mining and transaction clearing (which seems quite high per transaction on the face of it).

    Would love to hear other thoughts
    Good information, thank you for sharing.

    On a related note, I read some information recently about a FOIA request into how much money the big banks got in the last bailout.

    I know we were all appalled when we heard the banks got $5 trillion back in 2009.

    Turns out, it was $30 trillion, created out of thin air as debt for "We The People..."

    I've also read the past year of *Quantitative Easing" has created another $90 trillion in debt as the FED keeps feeding the big banks with our debt dollars while they buy up our real property at inflated prices because it's all Monopoly money to them.

    Do you see it yet?

    ------------------------------------------------------

    Out of touch and zero ducks to give. These people think they are royalty.

    Meanwhile in Australia.... - YouTube

    ----------------------------------------------------

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    The Canadian Truckers CAN'T Be Stopped! - YouTube

  6. #19186
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    The first shots have been fired by Ukraine with a drone gifted to them by the USSA.
    https://twitter.com/RT_com/status/1488559538982821894

    1 Russian death according to reports.

  7. #19187
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    Quote Originally Posted by Satch12879 View Post
    Except, that’s not where the “value” of real money or a metal as a currency comes from, which Bitcoin does not have.
    Currencies ultimately have value because people value them. That's circular reasoning but ultimately true. Fiat based currencies have value because that's the only medium of exchange governments will accept taxes in, taxes which you will go to jail for not paying.

  8. #19188
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    COVID19 Factors We Should Consider/Current Events-img_0863-jpg

    No kit salad for me tonight.

    Several layers of meaning in this image from my world-famous Kroger tonight.

    1. Supply chain shortage
    2. Labor shortage
    3. ~ 10 - 15 in. of snow imminent

    Not shown is the empty bread aisle. Not of people, of bread.

    Soviet style.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #19189
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkm5 View Post
    Help me understand, what is the "asset" or inherent value behind BTC? It literally appears to be the definition of a massive Ponzi scam, sponsored by some agencies with lots of capital letters, maybe...
    In ways it is similar to a ponzi scheme. So are a lot of stocks, given how much the books get cooked. So is social security. People manage to make money from all of them, though. The "inherent" value is the computing power and time required to mine a new unit of cryptocurrency. It still won't have value if everyone decides they don't want it, but the same is true of even regular currency. In investment terms, it's almost entirely sentiment-driven.

  10. #19190
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    Quote Originally Posted by VNV View Post
    COVID19 Factors We Should Consider/Current Events-img_0863-jpg

    No kit salad for me tonight.

    Several layers of meaning in this image from my world-famous Kroger tonight.

    1. Supply chain shortage
    2. Labor shortage
    3. ~ 10 - 15 in. of snow imminent

    Not shown is the empty bread aisle. Not of people, of bread.

    Soviet style.
    Don't worry, I'm sure the local state office will have bread to hand out. Just show your vaccine card and enjoy your free loaf. Exactly as planned.

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