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Thread: COVID19 Factors We Should Consider/Current Events

  1. #28421
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    • starting strength seminar jume 2024
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    Interestingly, Alabama has been on my radar as a potential destination for when I move from Seattle.

  2. #28422
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    And Eric never explained the Biden Crime Family bribery situation, so still waiting on that.
    I've been busy, so sorry about that. To further the conversation, though, I'll admit I'm ignorant on much of that situation. The little I know and the brief research I've been able to mine is that there seems to be a lot of highly suspicious activity around the Biden family's business dealings - particularly international ones - and how they could heavily imply bribery of the Presidential office. I know suspicions heightened tremendously after the Hunter Biden Laptop Incident, and to my knowledge no direct link between the President and these dealings has been established. Edify me further if you feel inclined to do so.

    Regardless of my knowledge of that specific situation, I stand by my original assertion that concrete evidence should be required to actually convict or even indict. I don't consider suspicious activity the same as evidence (remember, my pattern recognition software is buggy). Show me the money, show me the services, etc. I assume, probably at my own peril, that since there's been no indictments, then there is either no evidence or it is thoroughly inadequate. Conversely, with Menendez, the evidence required to prosecute is plentiful.

    I do think the gold bars are wildly ostentatious though. Like he wanted to cement the proof.

  3. #28423
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    And I never got an answer to this:
    The article quotes the DHS Secretary Mayorkas. I am not familiar with him. According to his wiki


    "Alejandro Nicholas Mayorkas[14] was born in Havana, Cuba, on November 24, 1959.[4] When he was one year old, his parents fled with him and his sister to the United States in 1960 as refugees, following the Cuban Revolution. He lived in Miami, Florida, before his family moved to Los Angeles, California, where he was raised for the remainder of his youth.[15] Mayorkas grew up in Beverly Hills and attended Beverly Hills High School.[16]

    His father, Charles R. "Nicky" Mayorkas, was born in Cuba. He was a Cuban Jew of Sephardi (from the former Ottoman Empire, present-day Turkey and Greece) and Ashkenazi (from Poland) background. He owned and operated a steel wool factory on the outskirts of Havana.[15][17][18][19] Nicky Mayorkas studied economics at Dartmouth College.[19]

    His mother, Anita (Gabor),[20] was a Romanian Jew whose family escaped the Holocaust and fled to Cuba in the 1940s[21][22][23] before leaving to the United States after the Cuban Revolution.[21]

    Mayorkas earned his Bachelor of Arts degree with distinction from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1981.[24] He received his Juris Doctor from Loyola Law School in 1985."

    Very interesting family history. The article also quotes Kathy Hochul, whose husband, Bill, is also the son of Jewish immigrants.

    Obviously the Jewish part is not important. Perhaps being the children of immigrants, they are more sympathetic? That's all I can figure, as again, obviously, the Jewish ancestry is not relevant.

  4. #28424
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    Is This Shadowy DOJ Department Concocting “PC” Statements for White Families Who Are Victims of Murder and Rape by Minorities?

    Why do so many whites react this way?

    It could just evince how well the system has conditioned them. Ever since they were children, they were told to never notice race and treat black-on-white attacks as isolated incidents. To think differently is impolite at best and hateful at worst. Mass media and public education has done a number on the white worldview. Racialized guilt has become so deeply ingrained into the psycho-spiritual life of Western whites that it has even received expression in various religious rituals.

    But it may not all be a natural result of social conditioning. As it turns out, the Department of Justice has a service specifically designed to ensure whites don’t get the wrong idea about minority crimes. The Community Relations Service bills itself as “America’s Peacemaker” for:

    "communities facing conflict based on actual or perceived race, color, national origin, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion, or disability. CRS works toward its mission by providing facilitated dialogue, mediation, training, and consultation to assist these communities to come together, develop solutions to the conflict, and enhance their capacity to independently prevent and resolve future conflict."

    ...

    The CRS also intervened when Somali migrants killed a white man in Lewiston, Maine in 2018. State police said race fueled the murder of Donald Giust. The violence highlighted the danger of the new arrivals, but CRS wanted the local whites to ignore that problem.

  5. #28425
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Schexnayder View Post
    I don't agree that most people fall into the "lazy and greedy" category (don't those seem pretty antithetical?).
    Lazy and greedy are only antithetical in the context of an individual who believes in earning what they want.

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Schexnayder View Post
    They want better lives and a better future for themselves and their children, and in this day and age that is facilitated by dual income. Last I checked that was one of the advantages of living in a free, capitalistic society. If "free" daycare - paid for by taxes that most have no option to not pay - results in a significant net positive for them, what exactly is the problem?
    First off, let me clarify that I acknowledge that public schooling is the best available option for many people. That said, the way that a dual income has become the baseline has been an insidious harm for this country. It puts many households into situations where they cannot function well, or at all, without either two incomes or one income + subsidies of some sort. This is not exactly contributing to human flourishing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Schexnayder View Post
    It's bizarre to insist on exceptional education for one's children and then not model the application of that education through a challenging, meaningful career. That's not to say that homeschooling your children can't serve as that model, but if you're modelling educating your children so that they can grow up to educate their children, then where does the productive contribution to society come in to play?
    Eric, do you realize that this reduces productive contribution to society solely to being an individual member of the workforce? Was that your intention?

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Schexnayder View Post
    People can get too stressed out about their children's education at a very young age. Yes there are fundamental things like reading, writing, and arithmetic that should be learned. But beyond that I think socialization and imaginary play are far more important, and I think public school can provide a good environment for that.
    But what are classrooms socializing the children for?

    The large-scale classroom environment is extremely artificial, and a very new thing in human history. Where else in life are you thrown more or less randomly together with people based on birthdays and perhaps arbitrary geographical guidelines (but not small enough to be a meaningful neighborhood), to engage in activities that require a high degree of enforced uniformity, regardless of personal choice, individual aptitude, etc?

    Personally, the more a workplace, training class, or any other environment reminds me of the various public schools I attended, the less adult it is, and the less I like it.

    Furthermore, a classroom teacher is unfairly expected to take these groups and maintain order, with a paucity of time and exposure to know the kids as individuals. Any aspect in which a student falls more than one standard deviation outside the norm becomes a problem, one way or another. Coping strategies are needed, primarily to get by in the artificial construct of the classroom - either (in the best cases) to enable learning subject matter and skills, or (in worse cases) simply to maintain order and get through the day. It would work better to have very small student-teacher ratios, with instructors who very well know and are heavily involved with the students as human beings, and can thus tailor the instruction to the individuals.

    Turns out, we have a structure that can do exactly that. It's called a family.

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Schexnayder View Post
    I mostly agree with this, though I think there's a problem with the assumption of dollar-for-dollar value. Homeschooling and private schools are both far more expensive than publicly funded education. And you have to be mindful of the unfortunate reality that if worthwhile tax benefits exist, an incentive to "homeschool" children and take advantage of free money is created, if you catch my drift.
    I get what you're saying, though it's not free money when it's your own that's just not being taken from you... More to the point, the reason that a homeschooling credit wouldn't be given to childless households, but would be given to the homeschooling ones isn't because it's a refund for not using the public education. It's because the homeschooler is saving the state the money it would have been spending on the education of those particular children.

    I'm not against the idea of public education - not everyone can (or should) homeschool. I do want it to be effective and to "first do no harm", however.

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Schexnayder View Post
    And unfortunately I think it will only get worse, because as this thread indicates, those who are concerned and who think critically about these serious issues would rather, as you said, cut and run. I can't say I blame them; it is in fact easier for one to change things that are actually with one's control than to take on the whole establishment. But it creates a self-fulfilling prophecy.
    Again, this ignores the "both/and" crowd. One of our factors for leaving public school was specifically that teachers did not need to spend extra time teaching our boys, say, mathematics, so them being there was taking resources from those who did need their attention. This was right alongside the understanding that some of the teachers were using curricula that fail to teach math anyway... There's room for multiple factors. Our civic involvement can try to make things better for public school kids while protecting the ones we can from the problems - in fact, those kids may just grow up to be civic-minded and responsible people who can continue to exert positive influence on this world...at least if we have anything to say about it.

  6. #28426
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Roberts View Post
    This post probably should have had a trigger warning.

    My apologies to those who felt personally attacked by my comments but sometimes life's challenges are like that last rep of a heavy set of 5. You have to make the decision on how you will handle it and hold yourself accountable. It's not my intent to be judgmental.

    Kudos once again to those who have successfully homeschooled their children. I know some solid citizens that were homeschooled.

    I won't parse all the responses to my post. I will acknowledged that I feel a tiny bit like I have inadvertently attracted some haters. I give due respect to them.
    As one of the responders let me assure you and the audience that I am not triggered nor upset nor do I feel attacked. I kind of thought this was the sort of place where we're all adult enough to handle some argument. If this isn't a topic people want to discuss that's fine, but let's not characterize a discussion as triggering as a way to avoid it. Feel free to respond as you please. You presented your thoughts and I responded to them as someone who had to ask myself that very question. My answer to myself was the same question I posed to you- Why do they deserve to lose the best education for them while I pursue my dream of changing the system? My answer was that they didn't. That if I wanted to change the system that was something I needed to do on my own time rather than sacrifice their education to that ideal. I think it's silly to present it as an either/or situation. Long term, after studying the situation closely here, I decided that the real changes were not possible at the local level. I'm not sure real changes will be able to start anywhere other than the teachers' colleges and possibly the admin who are getting the kickbacks for buying the suckiest curriculum possible. But I do know that I was not prepared for the amount of grift in that snake pit. The same question has arose with almost any decision. Does one leave where one lives for greener pastures or does one try to change local government? I think people have to do what's right for them. What can the person handle? Are they genuinely outnumbered?

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Schexnayder View Post
    If "free" daycare - paid for by taxes that most have no option to not pay - results in a significant net positive for them, what exactly is the problem?
    So you're looking around at the kids graduating and you're ok with the quality of their education? Because from what I've seen helping the children of friends and what I saw in the community college classes and even university classes I took these young folk are so not prepared. I mean not prepared for basics like a simple 500 word essay in response to a question. They are utterly spoon-fed at the freshmen level and sometimes beyond depending on the class. Grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, how to take notes, I've helped and seen enough to worry me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Schexnayder View Post
    It's bizarre to insist on exceptional education for one's children and then not model the application of that education through a challenging, meaningful career.
    Please elaborate.

  7. #28427
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Schexnayder View Post
    I've been busy, so sorry about that. To further the conversation, though, I'll admit I'm ignorant on much of that situation. The little I know and the brief research I've been able to mine is that there seems to be a lot of highly suspicious activity around the Biden family's business dealings - particularly international ones - and how they could heavily imply bribery of the Presidential office. I know suspicions heightened tremendously after the Hunter Biden Laptop Incident, and to my knowledge no direct link between the President and these dealings has been established. Edify me further if you feel inclined to do so.

    Regardless of my knowledge of that specific situation, I stand by my original assertion that concrete evidence should be required to actually convict or even indict. I don't consider suspicious activity the same as evidence (remember, my pattern recognition software is buggy). Show me the money, show me the services, etc. I assume, probably at my own peril, that since there's been no indictments, then there is either no evidence or it is thoroughly inadequate. Conversely, with Menendez, the evidence required to prosecute is plentiful.
    This stuff is not very hard to find: Hunter Biden received $260K from Beijing during dad's campaign — with Joe's address on wire: Comer

    First son Hunter Biden received two wire transfers from Chinese nationals worth a total of $260,000 months after dad Joe began his 2020 presidential campaign — and with the elder Biden’s Delaware home listed as the beneficiary address, a key House Republican said Tuesday.

    Oversight Committee Chairman James Comer (R-Ky.) revealed financial records that his panel subpoenaed turned up the transfers in July and August 2019.

    The revelation is another blow to President Biden’s insistence that he had no knowledge or discussion of his only surviving son’s foreign business interests.

    “Bank records don’t lie but President Joe Biden does. In 2020, Joe Biden told Americans that his family never received money from China,” Comer said in a statement.

    “We’ve already proved that to be a lie earlier this year, and now we know that two wires originating from Beijing listed Joe Biden’s Wilmington home as the beneficiary address when he was running for president.”
    No Evidence of Wrongdoing by Joe Biden? How About This? – PJ Media

    The Democrats and the media have been harping on the same talking point regarding the impeachment inquiry into Joe Biden, claiming there’s no evidence linking him to any wrongdoing.

    I know that’s not true. You know that’s not true. Frankly, they know it’s not true as well, but they’ll keep saying it repeatedly, hoping to convince the public that there is no evidence. Besides the sworn testimony, bank records, emails, phone calls, videos and photos, text messages, and White House visitor logs we already know about, new evidence released this week further undermines the “no evidence” narrative.

    According to text messages obtained by the House Ways and Means Committee, Joe Biden personally requested a meeting with a Chinese oil executive, Ye Jianming, whose company had paid millions of dollars in consulting fees to Hunter Biden.

    In an August 27, 2017, WhatsApp message to CEFC director Gongwen Dong, Hunter Biden mentioned that his uncle’s “brother” would be in New York City and wanted to meet with Ye.

    “My uncle will be here with his BROTHER who would like to say hello to the Chairman,” Hunter Biden said in a text message to Dong. “So please give me location and time. Jim’s BROTHER if he is coming just wants to say hello he will not be stopping for lunch.”

  8. #28428
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    Couples with the afore mentioned public education indoctrinating whites into Oikaphobia.

  9. #28429
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    Is This Shadowy DOJ Department Concocting “PC” Statements for White Families Who Are Victims of Murder and Rape by Minorities? - Revolver News

    Yeah, read this and tell me it's wrong.

    We all know what would happen if the races were reversed here. The story would receive wall-to-wall coverage on CNN and become an international news story. A racial angle would immediately be established and amplified to ten. The media would say the cyclist was “lynched” in an act reminiscent of the Jim Crow South. The single incident would be used to indict all white Americans as so-called “racists.” The family of the black victim would come out to demand radical social change to ensure nothing like this ever happens again. Everyone from journalists to politicians would ensure this tragedy became an important cultural event.

    None of that is happening in the murder of Andy Probst. Local media first covered his death as a simple accident while Probst’s family wants this to be seen as an isolated incident that has nothing to do with race.

    “We as a family in no way feel that Andy’s murder was based on race or profession,” Taylor Probst, the victim’s daughter, said at a news conference last week. “It was a random act of violence. We ask you to not politicize or use Andy’s murder to fuel political agendas or to create cultural wars.”

    Of course, every family is allowed to cope with such a tremendous loss in its own way. But this type of response follows a curious and disturbing pattern for whites reacting to the deaths of their loved ones at the hands of non-whites. White family members will often rush to dismiss a racial element to a heinous crime. Sometimes they will even declare that they forgive and defend their loved one’s killer.
    __________________________________

    https://twitter.com/theblaze/status/1707809499539513723

    Tucker is a very important voice in today's America. Never forget that the gaping pussies at Fox News fired him. This may not be up very long.

    ___________________________________

    And THIS just reaffirms my conclusion that this government is trying to destroy our ability to front an effective military response to hostile action:

    Navy to begin steroid testing for SEALs - CBS News

    ___________________________

    And while they're at it, maybe test the Border Patrol people: https://twitter.com/EndWokeness/stat...21541231038780

    And the FBI and the ATF. Can't be too careful.

  10. #28430
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    https://twitter.com/theblaze/status/1707809499539513723

    Tucker is a very important voice in today's America. Never forget that the gaping pussies at Fox News fired him. This may not be up very long.
    80% of the women in the Romanov family are wearing red ribbons in solidarity with the Bolsheviks who wound up murdering them
    Universal suffrage was one of the most important tactical blows against Western civilization. There won't be real reform until we have a crop of men with the balls to address this and similarly thorny issues.

    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Rowe View Post
    Trying to lead a governing body in this day and age is an exercise in futility. Largely because of the character, knowledge and independence of the average constituent.
    This is what happens when you cut off the right tail of the bell-curve of human achievement and feed it to the mean. The problem isn't so much that the average constituent is dumb, it's that the average constituent is "equal".

    Quote Originally Posted by David Roberts View Post
    A real revolution should start by infiltering the establishment.
    Only if you have entropy on your side. Infiltration is for termites and cockroaches, not good and noble men. Trying to beat the most wildly successful subversives history has ever know at their own game is a recipe for disaster. You definitely need to know your enemy, but you should not necessarily mimic him.

    A constructive revolution starts by building in parallel, becoming as self-sufficient as possible, and preparing for the demolition of the corrupted system.

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