COVID19 Factors We Should Consider/Current Events COVID19 Factors We Should Consider/Current Events - Page 434

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Thread: COVID19 Factors We Should Consider/Current Events

  1. #4331
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kitsuma View Post
    I see concern here for the residents whose property was damaged and life endangered in Seattle by the CHOP.

    Are there lawsuits? I search for google for residents suing Seattle, and I find hundreds of stupid lawsuits. But none for The CHOP?

    Was private property damaged there? Are the property owners standing down? Why? If so, maybe we should follow the money.

    I want to see lawsuits, and then I want to watch the activist judges throw them out. Will they get their social justice?
    Ah yes, the class action lawsuits have begun:
    More than a dozen businesses and residents inside CHOP zone, on Seattle's Capitol Hill, file 56-page class action lawsuit against the City of Seattle. They're seeking unspecified damages, to be determined at trial.
    So, instead of guns, we look to the system to work. I'm sure the Activist Judges are sweating this one. Popcorn.

    Regarding the required useless fake "masks", the shunning of local authorities has begun (expressnews.com):
    Irate customer erupts, gets into confrontation with county judge over mask rule at San Antonio Lowes
    Boomers are such pains in the ass with their data, gadgets, & facts:
    Youtube - Testing Oxygen Levels Under A Mask w an OSHA Air Quality Monitor

    and finally, a two part message from the UK working class:
    Twitter: Part 1
    Twitter: Part 2

    Looks like there are still those in the UK with balls intact. The Awakening is worldwide.

    Working class UK message: Part 3

  2. #4332
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnsonville View Post
    I saw that and live in Connecticut, Iím going to Florida in two weeks. What I donít get is that you can get a covid test at fucking cvs, any walk-in, or any dr office pretty much whenever you want. So for example: I already booked a covid test the day after I get back from florida at the dr office, do I still need to quarantine? Itís all such a joke here.
    The test is not that good. The window of incubation is large. If you test negative you may either be falsely negative or havenít had time to develop symptoms. Most people that are exposed develop symptoms in a few days but there are instances in which people donít test positive for 11-14 days.

    For the record I have been professionally dealing with this mess since mid March. The testing is a pain. The medical community is uncertain of many aspects of this disease and the recommendations for everything change constantly. In March we were told early intubation was helpful, and non invasive support was not likely to help people with severe disease. Now we know that is not entirely accurate. We were told surfaces were a legitimate risk, then they werenít, now it is we are not sure. The number of hospitalizations is going back up even where I am (Louisiana) after we weathered the initial surge. The number of cases in Houston is high enough pediatricians are being asked to care for adults.

    I am not saying that the vast majority of people infected will not recover. It is obvious now most will. I am not saying we should shut everything back down. I am merely saying it is a complicated problem Because of the disease itself and the limitations of our knowledge. The potential for overwhelming the system is there (at least in some areas). No matter what we do people will die from this, and if we take more drastic economic actions people will suffer/die from that as well.

  3. #4333
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bbinck1 View Post
    ...I am not saying that the vast majority of people infected will not recover. It is obvious now most will. ...
    Do you think the lethality of the virus will diminish with increased exposure to people?

  4. #4334
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    Quote Originally Posted by VNV View Post
    Do you think the lethality of the virus will diminish with increased exposure to people?
    I am not a virologist so I am not sure. However it is my understanding that most viruses that mutate tend to become less severe. Mutation to higher lethality is rarer. I do believe that mutation to mild virulence will take a long time, and we will have a vaccine by then. COVID doesnít mutate as quickly as influenza so it is an easier target. The media continues to hype that we have never developed a vaccine for a coronavirus but that is rather silly to say because most strains were either not economically significant or were like the original 2 which were lethal enough they didnít propagate as well. Hence there was no dire need for a vaccine. Honestly I worry more about long term damage to my lungs should I contract it. People act like itís either death or nothing but a cold but I assure you there are people who live that have respiratory impairment, which again can range from minimal to catastrophic. And the vaccine may not work for very long or it may be lifelong we just donít know. The whole situation is a complicated mess with a bunch of conflicting opinion.

  5. #4335
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark E. Hurling View Post
    If Bidet wins in 2020, this will all vaporize. God help us all in any event. If Trump wins in 2020, more active measures will be taken against the remnants of these clowns, since he would have 4 more years.
    Mark, he hasn't even signed the EO on birthright citizenship, and that's with the threat of an election looming over him.
    After re-election, in lame duck mode, what motivation do you imagine for taking politically risky gambles, especially by someone with such an addiction to left-wing media praise?
    Let's not be like the many Conservative suckers who get thrilled by promises at election time, then become all mealy-mouthed with excuses for our side when the time to take action arises!

    I do, for the record, hope that DJT takes measures against these clowns, whether sooner or later, but this just feels like another issue that should be acted upon while emotions are hot and tensions are flaring around the issue itself.

  6. #4336
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bbinck1 View Post
    The test is not that good. The window of incubation is large. If you test negative you may either be falsely negative or havenít had time to develop symptoms. Most people that are exposed develop symptoms in a few days but there are instances in which people donít test positive for 11-14 days.

    For the record I have been professionally dealing with this mess since mid March. The testing is a pain. The medical community is uncertain of many aspects of this disease and the recommendations for everything change constantly. In March we were told early intubation was helpful, and non invasive support was not likely to help people with severe disease. Now we know that is not entirely accurate. We were told surfaces were a legitimate risk, then they werenít, now it is we are not sure. The number of hospitalizations is going back up even where I am (Louisiana) after we weathered the initial surge. The number of cases in Houston is high enough pediatricians are being asked to care for adults.

    I am not saying that the vast majority of people infected will not recover. It is obvious now most will. I am not saying we should shut everything back down. I am merely saying it is a complicated problem Because of the disease itself and the limitations of our knowledge. The potential for overwhelming the system is there (at least in some areas). No matter what we do people will die from this, and if we take more drastic economic actions people will suffer/die from that as well.
    Thanks for the info. I booked my trip before I really knew cases were rising that much in Florida, Iím going to ft lauderdale. I can still postpone or cancel the trip, but a concern I do have is I will be going to a large party two days after I get back, I assumed if I was tested the day I got back and it came back negative I would be good to go, and obviously if it was positive Iíd quarantine. Is this a dumb idea? I can still postpone or cancel the trip.

  7. #4337
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    The BBC reported on the progress of the vaccine yesterday

    YouTube

    The Imperial College in London reckon "if it works, the team says it should have enough to immunise 40 million people in the UK, by the middle of next year"

    From day one of the outbreak the MSM and Government have been nothing short of obsessed with saving us from the "deadly virus" with a dosage of a "vaccine". They must really care about us so much.

    By God with the money and development time spent on this vaccine I'd bet my Mortgage they will make this vaccine "work".

    Pre 2020 I was never a conspiracy theorist but Dr Vernon Coleman is starting to win me over

    Watch this video in which he links the vaccine agenda with the 5G rollout agenda, perfect match

    YouTube

  8. #4338
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bbinck1 View Post
    The test is not that good. The window of incubation is large. If you test negative you may either be falsely negative or havenít had time to develop symptoms. Most people that are exposed develop symptoms in a few days but there are instances in which people donít test positive for 11-14 days.

    For the record I have been professionally dealing with this mess since mid March. The testing is a pain. The medical community is uncertain of many aspects of this disease and the recommendations for everything change constantly. In March we were told early intubation was helpful, and non invasive support was not likely to help people with severe disease. Now we know that is not entirely accurate. We were told surfaces were a legitimate risk, then they werenít, now it is we are not sure. The number of hospitalizations is going back up even where I am (Louisiana) after we weathered the initial surge. The number of cases in Houston is high enough pediatricians are being asked to care for adults.

    I am not saying that the vast majority of people infected will not recover. It is obvious now most will. I am not saying we should shut everything back down. I am merely saying it is a complicated problem Because of the disease itself and the limitations of our knowledge. The potential for overwhelming the system is there (at least in some areas). No matter what we do people will die from this, and if we take more drastic economic actions people will suffer/die from that as well.
    If the people calling the shots on this stuff have been almost 100% wrong about it from the beginning, why should I take seriously anything the medical community or politicians say? If it is a complicated problem, why should I follow the orders of people who have proven beyond a doubt in the last several months that they don't have the ability to solve complicated problems?

  9. #4339
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    Quote Originally Posted by MatthewG View Post
    Watch this video in which he links the vaccine agenda with the 5G rollout agenda, perfect match

    YouTube
    His physics background is not strong.

  10. #4340
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean Berry View Post
    So, are there times that Houston or other metro areas run at this capacity? I don't know enough about it to comment on that. However, if only 27% of the patients were admitted due to Covid, seems that they'd be running at 70% without it? How many are ALSO Covid positive and it is not the causative agent for admission?

    I HATE being this cynical.

    sb
    My understanding is that Houston hospitals run at this capacity a lot. My wife interned at several Houston hospitals during nursing school long before COVID-19. She observed that many of these hospitals run 80% - 100% capacity.

    N=1, but the observations are fairly random (different hospitals, different times of year, different days of the week, etc.).

    Houston is home to the Texas Medical Center, which is the largest medical complex in the country. Many people travel here to get surgery or specialist treatment. It's not a huge jump to imagine that increased activity in these areas leads to increased intensive care rates. So this may be a case where a small, select group of hospitals is servicing a much larger area.

    Also, Houston is a huge area, and even those of us that live out in the 'burbs would rather seek out treatment and care in "Houston" hospitals (i.e., in the Medical Center) as opposed to our local hospitals.

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