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Thread: Motorcycles

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2020
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    Default Motorcycles

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    Rip,

    Your previous podcasts with Fred Ashmore made it clear you have owned and driven plenty of cars over the years, developing an appreciation for them as more than just a method of transport.
    Do you also hold this appreciation for motorcycles as well? You have mentioned previously that up until fairly recently you had ridden motorcycles for most of your life.

    If so, what were some of the bikes you have owned in the past?
    You mentioned again in the podcast that you have owned several Japanese and European cars, has this also been the case with bikes?
    Finally, do you have any recommendations for good roads/trips to do on a motorcycle in one's lifetime?


    Thanks in advance

  2. #2
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    Jul 2007
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    I have owned 3 motorcycles, a 1979 Sportster, a shop built custom 80" shovelhead, and a Valkyrie. All were ridden on long roard trips in the western United States.

    My advice for the best way to do a 2-week roard trip is to decide approximately where you want to end up, pack your shit on the bike, and head that direction. Make all other decisions about how to get there, where to eat, what to see, and where to stay while your on the road. And take paper maps with you. They work a lot better.

  3. #3
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    May 2020
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    Great. Thank you.

  4. #4
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    Nov 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    My advice for the best way to do a 2-week road trip ...
    If I may, I would add to this by saying that it's probably better to build up gradually to very long trips, especially if you plan to ride solo.
    Riding alone with nothing more than a general plan and a paper map is easier once you develop your feel for the road and the various situations you encounter; where and when to stop, when to take a detour and when to press on, when to turn down the opportunity to fill up and which place might be good to spend the night.
    It's something that you build up with experience, and the self-confidence that you will derive form it will make long rides more enjoyable, and less stressful.

    Ride Safe,

    IPB

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