COVID19 Factors We Should Consider/Current Events COVID19 Factors We Should Consider/Current Events - Page 215

starting strength gym
Page 215 of 2464 FirstFirst ... 1151652052132142152162172252653157151215 ... LastLast
Results 2,141 to 2,150 of 24632

Thread: COVID19 Factors We Should Consider/Current Events

  1. #2141
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    50,003

    Default

    • starting strength seminar december 2022
    • starting strength seminar february 2023
    • starting strength seminar april 2023
    Quote Originally Posted by Dillon Spencer View Post
    Honestly, I can't believe I've even typed this much about this, because all I was trying to do was point out that a Costco employee wearing PPE and not touching a receipt he's perfectly capable of reading without touching probably wasn't worth posting as an example of ridiculous overreactive behaviour.
    The "Public Burden" argument is the central question here. They just shut down restaurants, bars, gyms, stores, and lots of other places because we have all made the assumption that we are all responsible for everybody else's health and safety. There is no other reason to shut down a restaurant except to argue that the restaurant is responsible for contagious disease transmission. I'm not saying that the Health Department should allow dirty kitchens to poison people, although it's been my experience that the market disposes of shitty restaurants quickly and thoroughly. But the flu comes through every year, and this is the first time we have decided that owners of buildings are responsible for diseases that other people bring into the room. Again, where does this shit stop?

  2. #2142
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Toronto, ON, CA
    Posts
    734

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark E. Hurling View Post
    Something to consider. I dunno, at 69 and having ducked the bullets of polio, swine flu in the 70's, SARS, MERS, et. al. I am damned if I will wear a mask or gloves.

    Gauleiter Pritzker of Illinois "loosened" some of our house arrest yesterday. Not much though. He also said it is mandatory to wear a mask in public if 6 feet of distance can't be maintained. While I am not afraid of this latest iteration of the Kung Flu, I haven't altered my daily round of activities much. That is to say, no gym time and no library books. I do get in some training on a parkour station with a loaded backpack on the dip fixture and pull up bars, and make do further with reverse hypers while lying prone on a picnic table and step ups on a bench.

    I didn't get within 6' of anyone before, even when lifting in the gym except to ask to a spot on my bench press every few months when trying to determine my 1RM. Now, the only people I am in close proximity to is Dearly Beloved and our daughter.

    As I see it, if anyone is concerned about having a mask on within the 6' dynamic sphere, it can be the other guy. If he gets too close to me that's his problem. I'll move away out of courtesy, which I was doing before this nonsense began.
    And I'd agree that's your prerogative, up to a point. If we were dealing with something far deadlier than this I might take a different stance, but I've been doing the same. My physical encounters are far fewer than they used to be, but I'm pretty okay with that. Most of them were at work, and I'm working from home now. I'm also not wearing PPE around, as I'd say I average about 5-10 close encounters with others other humans per day. Pretty much just when I have to buy groceries/booze, and if I happen to run into someone in the elevator when I walk my dog. Even the grocery/booze buying is mostly at small, independent stores. Not because I'm afraid of the grocery stores, but because I'm not interested in lining up, and I'm making a more conscious effort to support local independent businesses. A silver lining is that it's reminded me that I should have been doing more of that all along, and I'll continue to do so post-apocalypse.

    Where I think there's a difference between you, myself, and this poor maligned Costco employee, is that we're not obligated to interact with hundreds of strangers per day as part of our job. If the inconvenience of a mask and gloves helps protect him and those hundreds of people per day, it strikes me as a pretty minimal inconvenience. I know many here and elsewhere automatically reject being told, or even advised, to do something by the government, but up here we're more trusting, and perhaps because of that our government also trusts us a bit more.

    Unfortunately this is now the world we live in, so we'll never know what would have happened without these measures and how much difference they made, if any. Best we can do is look at countries that have been less draconian about it. I read that Guardian article about Sweden that I'm sure many didn't, because The Guardian, and found it interesting. The gist of it was that Sweden felt more comfortable leaving things up to individuals, because of a greater degree of mutual trust between Swedes and their government. The citizens trust the government enough to follow their advice, and the government trusts them to do it.

    I don't think it's any secret that many Americans innately distrust the government, and will refuse to do something they don't want to do, just because the government told them they should. Obviously every society has that segment. Hell, Alberta is pretty much our Texas! It just seems more pronounced in the US. Call that a feature or a bug, but I don't think it's particularly up for debate. Is that part of the reason many places down there have felt the need to make more of this mandatory? Who knows! I just found it an interesting read, because up here we're somewhere in between the US and Sweden on the draconian scale. We also seem to have had a quicker, smoother rollout of various stimulus programs to help people out, which may be a factor in why we're less up in arms (so far!).

    All this is basically to say that my parents have ducked those same bullets, and still feel uncomfortable going about their daily business, as do many others. If masks and gloves on grocery store employees is the price to pay for them (and the rest of us) to go back to a more normal existence, I'm of the opinion that there are bigger issues to concern ourselves with at the moment.

  3. #2143
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    Littleton, CO
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CFinAK View Post
    For our part, we're having a serious discussion about it. It has been eye-opening to say the least.....
    That's great to hear!
    If you don't mind sharing, what specific events have been eye-opening for you? Has what's been happening with COVID-19 on the large scale been an influence? Or are your local schools methods been more of an influence? Is it something else?

    Quote Originally Posted by DaveJF View Post
    She was a teacher _but_ says that in retrospect she started out behind the curve because of it. IOW, she had to overcome the training in order to most effectively teach her new (tiny) little class.
    This says a lot. Those who don't have to overcome their formal training are actually more effective at teaching their kids.

    Thanks for the reply.

  4. #2144
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    The Great Frozen North
    Posts
    16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    The "Public Burden" argument is the central question here. They just shut down restaurants, bars, gyms, stores, and lots of other places because we have all made the assumption that we are all responsible for everybody else's health and safety. There is no other reason to shut down a restaurant except to argue that the restaurant is responsible for contagious disease transmission. I'm not saying that the Health Department should allow dirty kitchens to poison people, although it's been my experience that the market disposes of shitty restaurants quickly and thoroughly. But the flu comes through every year, and this is the first time we have decided that owners of buildings are responsible for diseases that other people bring into the room. Again, where does this shit stop?
    It stops when we put a stop to it Rip. We allowed this to happen. Americans stood by, collectively, for 70 fucking years now voting for the "lesser evil", lining up and falling all over each other to see who can be the first one to sign away our birthright in exchange for a little bit of security theater and a goddamned promise. WE became complacent, and the subversives won. It's done, over. We are far beyond the point where anything gets fixed at the ballot box. The only way now is blood, and nobody wants to talk about that.

  5. #2145
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    The Great Frozen North
    Posts
    16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sethiroth95 View Post
    That's great to hear!
    If you don't mind sharing, what specific events have been eye-opening for you? Has what's been happening with COVID-19 on the large scale been an influence? Or are your local schools methods been more of an influence? Is it something else?
    We've been kicking the idea around for most of this school year anyway. We tried to send our kids to a private school, and while it is better than the public schools, only marginally so and not worth the tuition to the tune of $10k annually. I dislike the Common Core teaching standards, and it seems like every time my daughter especially (she's 9) brings home a new math idea it is taught in the most convoluted and confusing way. Coronavirus has had nothing to do with it, other than now the kids are at home and we're doing school (and a day's worth of "school" takes about 2 hours on a slow day by the way, which makes me wonder what the hell is going on the other 5 hours she is at school). Civics is not taught, and "social studies " consists of blatantly left-wing "news" websites (MSNBC, CNN, etc) where children are supposed to "read two articles and write about how you feel". I dunno. I'm not the smartest guy in the world, but I'm not an idiot either. I managed Calculus 1, and have a decent grasp on most mathematical concepts through high school anyway. I grew up in a time where we still learned to diagram sentences (in WF, TX no less). I'm ranting, sorry. Bottom line is, I think we can do this home school thing. It'll end up giving us more flexibility and a hell of a lot more control, both of which I like.

  6. #2146
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Posts
    64

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    The "Public Burden" argument is the central question here. They just shut down restaurants, bars, gyms, stores, and lots of other places because we have all made the assumption that we are all responsible for everybody else's health and safety. There is no other reason to shut down a restaurant except to argue that the restaurant is responsible for contagious disease transmission. I'm not saying that the Health Department should allow dirty kitchens to poison people, although it's been my experience that the market disposes of shitty restaurants quickly and thoroughly. But the flu comes through every year, and this is the first time we have decided that owners of buildings are responsible for diseases that other people bring into the room. Again, where does this shit stop?

    It's not the flu! It is far more contagious, there are no vaccines against it, and has a higher mortality rate. We have already surpassed the number of expected annual deaths from the flu despite the restrictions everyone is complaining about. Please stop making this false comparison. But then again, we can now wait and see what happens once states start to open back up.

  7. #2147
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    1,003

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sean Berry View Post
    Here is one example I came across:

    [FONT="]Dee Kenny, 64, who works security at casinos on the Strip, said that she has underlying health issues and that for her to feel safe, she would like employers to provide workers with personal protective equipment and to test all employees for the virus and its antibodies.[/FONT]
    [FONT="]"There's no proper protocols in place anywhere," Kenny said. "I'm not going to go back until I'm not at risk."

    So, this person is never going back to work. Ever.
    This is from a news report about Vegas opening back up. No reason to link to it.

    I actually fear that demands like this will lead to policy being made that requires testing to go back to work, possibly routinely, and more of these silly "must wear PPE" in public dictates from local (maybe state) governments and certainly from government funded entities.

    sb[/FONT]



    Without speaking to whether or not her demands are unreasonable, I find her fear perfectly rational.

    If her underlying health issues belong to the set of usual culprits (diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, obesity, and a few others I'm sure), then the risk landscape for her is very different from someone healthier. And even without underlying conditions, the risk isn't negligible either.

    And I would say the same thing during a bad flu season too, for those who are on the higher end of the vulnerability spectrum.

  8. #2148
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    RS WY
    Posts
    980

    Default

    We have already surpassed the number of expected annual deaths from the flu
    Except of course for those other times when flu pandemics killed more people than this virus or the “average” flu...

  9. #2149
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1,124

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BrunoLawerence View Post
    It's not the flu! It is far more contagious, there are no vaccines against it, and has a higher mortality rate. We have already surpassed the number of expected annual deaths from the flu despite the restrictions everyone is complaining about. Please stop making this false comparison. But then again, we can now wait and see what happens once states start to open back up.
    “nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law”

    Those are just pretty words to you, aren’t they Bruno?

  10. #2150
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    4,247

    Default

    starting strength coach development program
    Quote Originally Posted by BrunoLawerence View Post
    It's not the flu! It is far more contagious, there are no vaccines against it, and has a higher mortality rate. We have already surpassed the number of expected annual deaths from the flu despite the restrictions everyone is complaining about. Please stop making this false comparison. But then again, we can now wait and see what happens once states start to open back up.
    Have you not read anything that has been discussed on this 200+ page thread?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •