COVID19 Factors We Should Consider/Current Events COVID19 Factors We Should Consider/Current Events - Page 1291

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Thread: COVID19 Factors We Should Consider/Current Events

  1. #12901
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    • starting strength seminar october 2022
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    Response from the Texas AG over the Plano incident: https://twitter.com/KenPaxtonTX/stat...624473600?s=20

    Certainly looks a lot like a handgun that the protester was brandishing.

  2. #12902
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    It will be damned interesting to see what happens in the next municipal election in Plano. Out gym is now open there, 8240 Preston Road, Suite 120, Plano, TX 75024.

    __________________________________________________ ______________

    Warning: Graphic Nausea Trigger, seriously: Share and say thanks to someone that helped you through this past year. Enjoy "I want my vaccine" - YouTube

  3. #12903
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Harlin View Post
    It will be interesting to see lawsuits start flying. Many universities are stating that they are going to require students to get the jab. If you are told you have to do this by an employer or school and you have these type of reactions, you would have cause to go after these institutions.

    I wonder if the shield of immunity from liability that was given to the big pharmaceutical companies will eventually be pierced.
    From Lewrockwell.com: No Jab for Me - And Here Are 35 Reasons Why:
    So your employer backs you into a corner. Get the jab or quit. What do you do?

    Here’s what I would do:

    1. Demand that the ‘jab or quit’ proposition be put in writing.

    2. Explain that irrespective of whether it’s a government or a corporation, any entity that makes experimental vaccinations a condition of employment – or of doing business – engages in the practice of forced vaccinations, which is in violation of the Nuremberg code, especially experimental vaccinations that are still undergoing clinical trials scheduled to end in 2023.

    3. I would pull out my card ask the questions in it, leave the card with instructions to relay answers to me in writing

    4. I would inform the employer that lawyers are filing crimes against humanity lawsuits, and that I would be consulting an attorney

    This is just what I would do. I’m not giving anyone legal advice.

  4. #12904
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    Swedish doctor takes a look a the available studies on ivermectin.

    Not peer-review of course (and some of the studies hadn't got to that stage yet), but... "I was able to identify seven trials that fulfilled these criteria, with a total of 1,327 participants. Here’s what the meta-analysis shows:"

    "What we see is a 62% reduction in the relative risk of dying among covid patients treated with ivermectin. That would mean that ivermectin prevents roughly three out of five covid deaths. The reduction is statistically significant (p-value 0,004). In other words, the weight of evidence supporting ivermectin continues to pile up. It is now far stronger than the evidence that led to widespred use of remdesivir earlier in the pandemic, and the effect is much larger and more important (remdesivir was only ever shown to marginally decrease length of hospital stay, it was never shown to have any effect on risk of dying)."

  5. #12905
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    Quote Originally Posted by samhain3184 View Post
    Response from the Texas AG over the Plano incident: https://twitter.com/KenPaxtonTX/stat...624473600?s=20
    Paxton writes strongly worded letters like a true Republican, but will he actually take action and do his job? He gave no indication that he would.

    That chief of police thinks you can't arrest people if they commit crimes while in a group and that you negotiate with terrorists. And yes that's essentially what BLM shutting down traffic is. It's a mass false imprisonment action. I'd have been fine with that guy openly firing on them all in self defense against his liberty and freedom of movement by criminals. Retarded statements like by this chief will only embolden these terrorists to think they will not be touched, along with the so-far inaction of the AG.


    Certainly looks a lot like a handgun that the protester was brandishing.
    Oh it's just one of those novelty lighters!! Totally!! Or it shoots out a little flag that says "Bang!" like in cartoons!

    Police have shot people dead wielding less than whatever that is.

  6. #12906
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    Once upon a time, doctors were a lot like engineers; they kept abreast with what was going on in the literature and occasionally went to a conference to learn a new technique, but by and large, their practice was informed by their academic training and analysis informed by years of hands-on experience. If they were fuck-ups; they lost patients. The old timers I were mentored by gave lip service to the codes because they had to, but, had tons of standard practices they developed over the years, either things they picked up from being builders themselves, or from fabricators, or contractors, or just sitting down and analyzing things. If you went into a design office as a young engineer and stayed long enough, you learned a system that informed how you practiced for the rest of your career and everything was filtered through that early training. A lot of these things you couldn't pull out of any code or design standard. Doctors had tricks and practices and recommendations that just fucking worked. If anything, they could make you feel better just by reassuring you that you were going to be OK. So many times my mother was despondent until our pediatrician told her that either my brother or I were going to be OK. And we were.

    Now, doctors can't do anything unless some bureaucrat at CDC or FDA or the AMA tells them specifically what to do and gives them a written protocol on how to do it. They don't sit down with a couple of textbooks and try and figure out treatment protocols when the need arises. Our pediatrician is a prime example. Lovely lady, enthusiastic, but she's given us some absolutely pointless and ineffective home-grown treatment strategies for our kids, while at the same time advising us emphatically on some absolutely nonsense bullshit based on something she read in a study or got from the pediatric college of physicians. And she's got two kids herself. My eldest daughter doesn't eat meat at all, getting all of her protein from dairy sources. The doctor told us to avoid giving her too much milk as it could lead to anemia. On its face it sounded like bullshit when my wife told me about it, and of course it is. My daughter's diet consists of the most diverse amount of fruits and vegetables, no junk food, and only the rare and occasional treat, all of her own choosing. If she develops a metabolic disorder, it's not because of what she's eating and I flat out reject the idea that milk of all things is going to fuck her up.

    This ivermectin thing is a prime example. I was reading something yesterday that some doctor being interviewed was kvetching that there was still no "official" treatment protocol. Well, asshole, that's because you're looking for the imbeciles that gave us this whole mess to give you the way out of it. "Official" should be your tell. The reality is that tons of doctors, old-time doctors, have worked up their own protocols, Zelenko with HCQ, zinc, and zithromycin, the other doctors with the IV steroid and vitamin infusions, the inhaled chorine dioxide, ivermectin which I'm convinced helped my uncle avoid being admitted and dying in a hospital this year, etc., all offering success numbers that are more than statistically significant. But, because those came from the ground up, they're never going to pass muster. That's not how THE SCIENCE(tm) works, mind you.

    I just don't get the same feeling of wisdom I got from my pediatrician growing up or the GP I went to deep into my 20s, both of whom are long retired. She even questioned the treatment my father's cousin, a doctor in Italy, gave to my daughter two years ago when we were on vacation to see family and she caught something in travel. The doctor diagnosed it as a strep variant, and gave her a strong antibiotic and an expectorant. Within two days of getting whatever medicine they have in Europe, she cleared the phlegm in her lungs and was back to her normal cheerful self. Our pediatrician didn't think the other doctor had any idea what she was doing.

    My mother is at the doctor every fucking week, it seems. Even she recognizes it. My in-laws, who seem to be made out of sugar, yet keep rolling on, the same. I said this morning, "I'm not getting old if I have to be at doctor's appointments every week."

    Shit's being pulled tight in one direction. I'm really interested to see what happens when it snaps back.

  7. #12907
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    https://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJ...b%20%200pubmed


    Dr Zeev Zelenko from a post he sent out earlier today on his inference from the study:
    He highlighted these words:
    "Among 827 participants who had a completed pregnancy, the pregnancy resulted in a live birth in 712 (86.1%), in a spontaneous abortion in 104 (12.6%), in stillbirth in 1 (0.1%), and in other outcomes (induced abortion and ectopic pregnancy) in 10 (1.2%). A total of 96 of 104 spontaneous abortions (92.3%) occurred before 13 weeks of gestation (Table 4), and 700 of 712 pregnancies that resulted in a live birth (98.3%) were among persons who received their first eligible vaccine dose in the third trimester. "

    Dr Zelenko:
    According to this NEJM study

    829 completed pregnancies.
    700 got vaccine in 3rd trimester
    129 got vaccine before 3rd trimester

    Out of 829 pregnancies only 129 of patients got the vaccine before the 3rd

    Let us compare statistics of 1st and 2nd trimester pregnancies

    So 104 spontaneous abortions (loss of pregnancies before 20 weeks) happened in 129 women who got vaccinated before the 3rd trimester

    That means 81% of pregnant women who got vaccinated before the 3rd trimester had spontaneous abortions

    The national average is 10-26% spontaneous abortions off all pregnancies

    I suggest that vaccination with covid-19 vaccines before the 3rd trimester increases the rate of spontaneous abortion by a factor 4-8x

  8. #12908
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    Quote Originally Posted by gilead View Post
    So 104 spontaneous abortions (loss of pregnancies before 20 weeks) happened in 129 women who got vaccinated before the 3rd trimester

    That means 81% of pregnant women who got vaccinated before the 3rd trimester had spontaneous abortions

    The national average is 10-26% spontaneous abortions off all pregnancies

    I suggest that vaccination with covid-19 vaccines before the 3rd trimester increases the rate of spontaneous abortion by a factor 4-8x
    Read this aloud.


    ___________________________________________


    And this guy continues to impress: Ron DeSantis Signs Bill Banning Local Governments From Implementing Their Own Gun Control Laws

    Jayanta Bhattacharya, professor of medicine at the University of Stanford who also has a PhD in economics, praised DeSantis in a recent interview for the way that he managed the state of Florida’s response to the pandemic.

    “I’ve never met a politician like him. He’s extraordinary,” Bhattacharya said. “We had a two-hour conversation, about COVID policies, this is in September of last year … and he had read all the papers I referenced and not just my just my articles, lots and lots of other papers. He knew all the details, it was a remarkable conversation. And then we had this like roundtable on September 25th, with Martin and Mike Leavitt, and with DeSantis leading it, and the next day he lifted most of the restrictions all across Florida.”

    “He could go up against epidemiologists,” Bhattacharya said. “I mean, most, most epidemiologists don’t know the literature as well as he does. I mean, I just I don’t have the words… I’ve just been, I’m still stunned by it, I didn’t know anything about him actually, before, you know, basically before September really. I’ve just been very impressed.”

    Bhattacharya said that Florida’s success during the pandemic was not the result of luck, but was a direct result of DeSantis being so well informed.
    __________________________________________________ _____


    And Coke and Anheuser Busch are sure making it easier to decide what not to buy: Is Anheuser-Busch Drunk? The Beer Behemoth Is Forcing the Woke 'Gender Unicorn' on Its Employees – PJ Media

  9. #12909
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    Quote Originally Posted by Satch12879 View Post
    Once upon a time, doctors were a lot like engineers;

    Now, doctors can't do anything unless some bureaucrat at CDC or FDA or the AMA tells them specifically what to do and gives them a written protocol on how to do it.
    Speaks to me a lot as an engineer working for a large production company. The risk/benefit analysis and expected work output are completely different from working as a lone professional. It's straightforward work to design a piece of equipment to perform a task, but an entirely different problem to solve when deciding whether that piece of equipment will actually solve anything in a "cost-effective, low risk" manner.

    Likewise, for an experienced doctor not raised in today's risk-averse medical industry, it's relatively easy to put your hands on a patient, give a diagnosis, recommend a treatment, and move on. But nowadays its a process for even the simplest diagnosis.

    Case in point: when I herniated a disc a few years back I went to an Urgent Care to get an opinion. The old doctor there sat me down, grabbed my leg, pushed on a few areas and lifted my leg up, and as soon as I screamed in pain he told me exactly what was going on. Told me an X-ray was a waste of time, get an MRI if I really wanted to confirm, but that there's really not much to do except wait for the inflammation to go down.

    Meanwhile, once I went to the Sports Medicine doctor to get the MRI, they told me I had to get an X-ray first. I asked the nurse why I should get an X-ray when they can't see a disc on it, she said "that's what your insurance requires." My mother in law once got 3 different X-rays on her arm to diagnose a broken thumb. One of the arm, one of the hand, one of the thumb. No bullshit.

    I've also had doctors walk in with computers guiding them through a diagnosis. One guy wouldn't even lay hands on me to check anything. Didn't even make eye contact while talking to me asking me questions. So weird.

    Most doctors work for insurance and pharmaceutical companies, not patients. The problem to solve is not the diagnosis and treatment, but the mitigation of the risk associated with caring for the health of another human being. Large companies manage risk, and so customers become statistics.

  10. #12910
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    Quote Originally Posted by Satch12879 View Post
    ...If anything (Drs), they could make you feel better just by reassuring you that you were going to be OK. So many times my mother was despondent until our pediatrician told her that either my brother or I were going to be OK. And we were.
    This all applies to my 85 yr old Mother today vis-a-vis COVID. Prayer and chicken soup.

    Many of us agree the handling of COVID has been a debacle, riddled with fraud and incompetency. Including many of the reasons you have pointed out. However, to make the argument that medicine (at large) is worse now than the past is in the same derangement space as claiming American racism problems are worse.

    Don’t be that guy.

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