COVID19 Factors We Should Consider COVID19 Factors We Should Consider - Page 118

starting strength gym
Page 118 of 353 FirstFirst ... 1868108116117118119120128168218 ... LastLast
Results 1,171 to 1,180 of 3523

Thread: COVID19 Factors We Should Consider

  1. #1171
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    41,847

  2. #1172
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    RS WY
    Posts
    852

    Default

    Is your solution to just let this go unchecked and run rampant in the community without the quarantine?
    How many people died from the virus in November December January February undocumented because there was no test and nobody was looking for it? How many got sick and recovered? How many were asymptomatic? How can we factor these possibilities into the worst case model the current quarantine policies are based upon?

  3. #1173
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Posts
    64

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post

    What has changed since the original models were formed? All I am seeing is that the current strategies appear to be working. I would be more apt to agree with you if the model did not change despite the current social distancing guidelines being put in place.

    I do have one question about that graph. I couldn't find the original source of the graph, does that represent the total number of "all" hospitalizations or is it the hospitalizations due solely to covid? I know the source is located at the bottom, but I could not find that exact graph. If it includes the former then this wouldn't address the questions being asked as it could be caused by, as you said, some hospitals currently being empty which I addressed above.

  4. #1174
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Posts
    64

    Default

    Correction, the last sentence of the above post should have read:

    "That is how the hot spots start. Do you really think it would be safer for those with pre-existing conditions to be coming into the hospital after this has spread throughout the community unchecked and the number of cases inside the hospital has increased?

  5. #1175
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    172

    Default

    Those "hospitals are empty" because the supplies needed to run them are no longer available. The attending physicians, residents, and nurses have been reassigned to medicine or ED. The imaging equipment is running slowly, because it needs to be cleaned thoroughly after each use. Maybe the OR now has beds.

  6. #1176
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    16

    Default

    For those familiar with Michael Bury, of the Big Short, he has some fairly strong views on the topic. As someone with medical quals and who is also extremely good with 'details', his comments are worth a read. Even if you disagree.

    https://twitter.com/michaeljburry

    bloomberg

  7. #1177
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    41,847

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Shiva Kaul View Post
    Those "hospitals are empty" because the supplies needed to run them are no longer available. The attending physicians, residents, and nurses have been reassigned to medicine or ED. The imaging equipment is running slowly, because it needs to be cleaned thoroughly after each use. Maybe the OR now has beds.
    4 sentences, none correct. Where do you live/work?

  8. #1178
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    172

    Default

    NJ, where the sentences are correct.

    Why do you believe much of the medical system is shut down? This is not mandated by the government, nor does it carry a financial incentive. Are the hospital administrators simply in the grip of bad models?

  9. #1179
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Posts
    64

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wiigelec View Post
    How many people died from the virus in November December January February undocumented because there was no test and nobody was looking for it? How many got sick and recovered? How many were asymptomatic? How can we factor these possibilities into the worst case model the current quarantine policies are based upon?

    These are questions that will need to be addressed with time to get an accurate assessment. However, are you implying that the number of cases has not been rapidly increasing with the spread of the infection over the past several months?

  10. #1180
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Posts
    103

    Default

    starting strength coach development program
    Quote Originally Posted by BrunoLawerence View Post
    You have to remember that it was our terrible response to this pandemic at its onset that led us here. South Korea and the United States both had their first reported case on the same day. However, they are not currently under quarantine. Why?, expansive testing at the beginning of the outbreak and the ability to contact trace. We knew this was coming back in December, but we didn't take it seriously. Testing was delayed and poorly administered, therefore it was impossible to contain it. This is a failure of the current administration's response to the pandemic. Once the number of new cases is close to zero, your ability to trace the contacts of those who are affected will become feasible and only those who need to be quarantined will be. But you are right, if we do start to get this under control and we fail to continue with testing we will most certainly be back to where we started until a vaccine is made available.
    I have no objection that our response was awful. We weren't prepared. The current administration ignored basic scientific facts and now it's tough to put the smoke back in the box.

    Korea has been through this with SARS, MERS, Swine Flu, and even some TB outbreaks back in the 80's or 90's, I think. If you think that our government is actually capable of mounting a response to where we can get back to an "acceptable" number (close to zero) and then contact trace people, including asymptomatics, by, say, June 1, you are fooling yourself. Wuhan, for example, was on 100% lockdown for 76 days. We are nowhere close to a 100% lockdown, so we're probably talking about double that, with the high probability that the government fucks it up and we start all over again.

    Also, Korea doesn't worry about some of the same privacy issues we have in this country. They're installing apps on people's phones and using them like tracking bracelets. We could learn a lot from Korea in terms of how to test, how to pay for it, why we should wear masks, blah, blah, blah.... But, if you think that people in this country are just going to allow the government to install tracking apps on their phones then you're living in a fantasy land.

    Handling this the way they do in much of Asia would mean that we step on the freedoms of every American and while some won't mind this, all it takes is a minority to refuse.

    Another spending bill is coming up. I would rather they focus it on the 55+ crowd staying home and letting the rest of America go back to work. It'll build herd immunity. It keeps large swaths of the vulnerable population protected, and it gets the economy going. If you're over 55. Groceries will be open an hour or two earlier for you for the foreseeable future. Your paycheck is assured if you're still working. Some younger folks will get it. Some will die. But, at least the bulk of the workforce is working again. The current plan is not tenable, sane, or even healthy for this country.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •