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  1. #61
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    • texas starting strength seminar september 2020
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    Has anyone read Ordinary Men: Reserve Police Battalion 101 and the Final Solution in Poland? Per the description, it's about how a unit of average middle-aged Germans became the cold-blooded murderers of tens of thousands of Jews. I've heard it mentioned a number of times, and am fascinated with how this happened. Might make this my next read.

  2. #62
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    Lots of great books on this thread, but itís time for some levity. ďThese trying timesĒ and all. Iím rereading Baja Oklahoma by noted Texan Dan Jenkins. Juanita Hutchins is the shit talking main character who bartends at a Fort Worth cafe but longs to be a country western singer. Takes place in the late 70s. Jenkinsí infamous ď10 stages of drunkennessĒ appears halfway through the book. Donít read this if you are offended by curse words, excessive drinking, sexual relations, or political incorrectness.

  3. #63
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    Currently reading The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (finished Tom Sawyer a week or two ago), Awareness: Conversations with the Masters and Letters to a Stoic (don't get the book with all 3 volumes combined, the print is a headache).

    This is what I've read so far year to dae: Jeffrey’s Year in Books

    I agree that 1984 is a great text. I read sometime last year alongside Brave New World, mainly because I was born in 1984 and have always loved Iron Maidens Brave New World album, but really enjoyed both and hope to one day have the time to read other texts by Huxley.

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    He also assumes the competence of the reader in understanding his prose -- nothing is spoon-fed, and you are responsible for learning quite a bit as you progress through the series.
    I think that is one of his real strengths and something I enjoy in an author. I'd read the first three and have just ordered them again.

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Button View Post
    Has anyone read Ordinary Men: Reserve Police Battalion 101 and the Final Solution in Poland? Per the description, it's about how a unit of average middle-aged Germans became the cold-blooded murderers of tens of thousands of Jews. I've heard it mentioned a number of times, and am fascinated with how this happened. Might make this my next read.
    I've not read that book, but I've read enough about the Holocaust to know that willingness and in many cases, eagerness, to assist the Germans/Nazis was common.

    I used to read a lot of non-fiction, but for the last decade, I've been addicted to watching/listening to The Great Courses, my library system has 100's of these in a wide range of subjects. I keep one or two in the truck all the time and prep for a long road trip is to pick up a bunch.

    My fiction covers a wide range, excluding only Romances. Along with rereading the old reliables like Robert Heinlein and Louis L'amour, of late I've been reading the works of Larry Correia, John Ringo, Ben Aaronovich, John Scalzi, Jack Campbell and Martha Well, but only her Murderbot Diaries

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by mitchless View Post
    I just finished reading (well... listening to the audiobook) Thomas Sowell's Ethnic America. It is a fascinating work studying the progress of a number of different immigrant ethnicities through their time in the United States.

    I'm also nearly finished with Crucial Conversations.

    I really enjoyed The Moon is a Harsh Mistress. Heinlein really thought out both the physical ramifications of long-term life in reduced gravity, the social consequences of a colony built from a debtors prison (though I question his conclusions there), and the political development. If Hollywood could make decent movies any more, I'd like to see a film adaptation of it. Unfortunately I think they'd do about as well as they did with Starship Troopers.

    While I haven't read the books, I noticed the influence of The Moon is a Harsh Mistress on The Expanse TV show, especially regarding those who were born in space.

    George R.R. Martin's Dying of the Light has a different take on the social/cultural outcomes of a society with a drastic shortage of women. Somewhat the opposite of Heinlein's libertarian, everyone-is-super-respectful-of-women conclusions (it's been a long time since I read The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress so forgive me if I mischaracterize).

  7. #67
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    Now is a good time for everyone to pick up Robert Higgs's Crisis and Leviathan.

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Satch12879 View Post
    Now is a good time for everyone to pick up Robert Higgs's Crisis and Leviathan.
    I thought it was time to pick up The Reloaders Bible?

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Southpaw View Post
    Donít read this if you are offended by curse words, excessive drinking, sexual relations, or political incorrectness.
    Most of us are offended by the lack of those things.

  10. #70
    Brodie Butland is offline Starting Strength Coach
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    starting strength coach development program
    Recently finished The Body by Bill Bryson. Basically a tour of the entire human body, starting at the outside (skin), then the innards from the head down to the feet. His A Short History of Nearly Everything was very good, so I figured it was worth a shot.

    Overall, pretty fascinating read, with a lot of interesting information about us and, also importantly, numerous acknowledgements of things that we really just don't know jack squat about. There is a short nutrition chapter that was a bit annoying at times (he is a lot kinder to Ancel Keyes's Seven Countries Study than I would ever consider being), but the discussion of how nutrition science began was worth the short sour taste. Definitely recommend.

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