Are training injuries sustained by SS authors "proof" that the method is imperfect? Are training injuries sustained by SS authors "proof" that the method is imperfect? - Page 3

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Thread: Are training injuries sustained by SS authors "proof" that the method is imperfect?

  1. #21
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    • wichita falls texas december seminar 2020
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    Hereís my two cents

    If you strive to be exceptionally strong by weightlifting standards sooner or later youíre going to get hurt

    Iím almost 70 and Iím at the point in my life I want to be able to do normal things with ease.

    When I was younger Benching 400 lbs or squatting 500 was something I just ďhadĒ to do.

    That level of strength is not something I care about anymore,

    My point I guess is IMO you can get very strong by normal Human standards and not be pushing the limits that a competitive lifter would be attempting to achieve, and drastically reduce injury potential.

    I can bench 225, squat 375 and pull 405 and Iím just in a ďholding patternĒ .

    Iím not trying to get stronger, itís kind of boring but I Warm up carefully and only lift twice a week to maintain this strength level.

    I donít hurt all the time, itís good enough for my needs.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamies33 View Post
    I drive, and I see the parallel drawn. The difference might be that I cannot control the cars around me, but I should be able to totally control a lift. I understand that tears occur from over-extended eccentric lift portions, so knowing this, I can definitely be sure to control the weight as it lowers. BUT, since you know this, and you are THE lift expert, why do you have injuries?
    I don't believe Rip actually followed "the method" since he developed it as an outgrowth of his coaching, not his own lifting. And I get the impression that a lot of his injuries happened off the platform.

    Rip, how many of your injuries were actually barbell related?

  3. #23
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    Do understand that I was not the original poster, and my comment is clearly in support of SS strength training, despite the small risk of injury. And I have read every one of the books.

    Quote Originally Posted by CommanderFun View Post
    I've been thinking about registering a complaint with the manufacturer on this issue.
    I'm totally calling corporate as soon as I've had my coffee.

  4. #24
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    I believe it was rip who wrote something along the lines of: injuries are the price you pay for not sitting on your ass your entire life. If youíre afraid to get some minor injuries then stay on the couch and struggle to get off the toilet when youíre old fat and weak. Itís not like riding a damn motorcycle where you could get killed or paralyzed, and most old people have injuries from doing everyday mundane shit, which mostly will not happen to someone who is strong.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommanderFun View Post
    Be smart and minimize it. Avoid lifting and you'll get injured because of that too. Your body will break sometimes. It does that, it's made to do that and recover from it.
    Every day wounds, and the last one kills.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt James View Post
    I don't believe Rip actually followed "the method" since he developed it as an outgrowth of his coaching, not his own lifting. And I get the impression that a lot of his injuries happened off the platform.

    Rip, how many of your injuries were actually barbell related?
    All my major injuries happened off the platform. The overuse/tendonitis stuff was due to bad technique. They are how Good Technique was discovered.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathon Sullivan View Post
    Every day wounds, and the last one kills.
    This should be on t-shirts and gym posters.

  8. #28
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    I apologize for what can easily be construed as a personal attack. I am humbly hoping to learn.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathon Sullivan View Post
    Every day wounds, and the last one kills.
    Yeh when I'm older I'd rather be strong as an ox with some aches and pains like Rip rather than having the withered brittle body of a sedentary vegan.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobman View Post
    Here’s my two cents

    If you strive to be exceptionally strong by weightlifting standards sooner or later you’re going to get hurt

    I’m almost 70 and I’m at the point in my life I want to be able to do normal things with ease.

    When I was younger Benching 400 lbs or squatting 500 was something I just “had” to do.

    That level of strength is not something I care about anymore,

    My point I guess is IMO you can get very strong by normal Human standards and not be pushing the limits that a competitive lifter would be attempting to achieve, and drastically reduce injury potential.

    I can bench 225, squat 375 and pull 405 and I’m just in a “holding pattern” .

    I’m not trying to get stronger, it’s kind of boring but I Warm up carefully and only lift twice a week to maintain this strength level.

    I don’t hurt all the time, it’s good enough for my needs.
    You're incredible. Thank you for this sensible reply. This thoroughly answers my question.

    FWIW, I think the general public are afraid of injuries. Of course this is addressed in SS and PP (I recall the section on how soccer was more injurious than weightlifting), but I do think the stigma still exists. For that reason, for the sake of growth of this superb and important product, it may be worth addressing the issue. Especially as it pertains to Mr. Rippetoe himself: the method was developed to prevent injuries (Good Technique discovered), and injuries experienced had nothing to do with weightlifting to begin with.

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