Are training injuries sustained by SS authors "proof" that the method is imperfect? Are training injuries sustained by SS authors "proof" that the method is imperfect? - Page 4

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Thread: Are training injuries sustained by SS authors "proof" that the method is imperfect?

  1. #31
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    • wichita falls texas december seminar 2020
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    Quote Originally Posted by mitchless View Post
    This should be on t-shirts and gym posters.
    Seconded.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brodie Butland View Post
    I would argue that the flaw is in the human body, which is notoriously ill-equipped for immortality or indestructibility.
    Wow Brody, well written. Wish I thought of that.
    Yes the issue, if there is a ďproblemĒ of injuries is likely not due to following a disciplined LP with proper nutrition and recovery. The issue is usually when I go full jackass mode and do something well outside the bounds of the program. Like you know, I just have to see where my 1 rep max is. What could possibly go wrong?

    The problem is not the programming in my n=1 case.

  3. #33
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    Since Iím one of the authors, Iíll throw in my own $.02. Iíve been training about 24 years. During that time Iíve only had one ďmajor injuryĒ under the bar. Ruptured my distal biceps tendon about 2 1/2 years ago. - so about 22 years into training. Did it on a set of DE Deadlifts. Weight was at 405 which is something Iíve pulled for thousands of reps over the years. Problem wasnít that I went too heavy. Problem was that I didnít respect the load on the bar. I got sloppy and lazy with my technique and allowed some small degree of elbow flexion to creep into the speed pulls. At heavier weights Iím cognizant of what my supinated arm is doing. When the weight feels light and fast I paid less attention to this small detail, and even though 405 was ďrelativelyĒ light at the time (probably about ~65% of 1RM)......itís still 405 lbs. Iíll also say that I distinctly remember ACTIVELY IGNORING a little voice in my head telling me that doing a high volume of speed pulls (I think 6-8x3 that day) with a supinated grip was dumb. My inner voice was telling me to go get my straps. They were in my truck outside, and my laziness won out over my good sense and instincts and I would up in the OR a few days later.

    Donít know if that adds to the conversation but there you go

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy Baker (KSC) View Post
    Since Iím one of the authors, Iíll throw in my own $.02. Iíve been training about 24 years. During that time Iíve only had one ďmajor injuryĒ under the bar. Ruptured my distal biceps tendon about 2 1/2 years ago. - so about 22 years into training. Did it on a set of DE Deadlifts. Weight was at 405 which is something Iíve pulled for thousands of reps over the years. Problem wasnít that I went too heavy. Problem was that I didnít respect the load on the bar. I got sloppy and lazy with my technique and allowed some small degree of elbow flexion to creep into the speed pulls. At heavier weights Iím cognizant of what my supinated arm is doing. When the weight feels light and fast I paid less attention to this small detail, and even though 405 was ďrelativelyĒ light at the time (probably about ~65% of 1RM)......itís still 405 lbs. Iíll also say that I distinctly remember ACTIVELY IGNORING a little voice in my head telling me that doing a high volume of speed pulls (I think 6-8x3 that day) with a supinated grip was dumb. My inner voice was telling me to go get my straps. They were in my truck outside, and my laziness won out over my good sense and instincts and I would up in the OR a few days later.

    Donít know if that adds to the conversation but there you go
    I think it sums up perfectly that usually what gets you injured is bad technique... Not ss technique

  5. #35
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    But sometimes you get injured using good technique. Sorry.

  6. #36
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    Bottom line is that you can take on the risks of training in order to reduce the risks that come with not being trained.

    As mentioned many times here and elsewhere, untrained older people get injured lifting the groceries or stepping out of the bathtub. Or just toppling over. I am far more likely to detach a bicep tendon (still unlikely) than if I didnít train, but Iíd gladly trade that risk to lower my chances of a broken hip down the road.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brodie Butland View Post
    I would argue that the flaw is in the human body, which is notoriously ill-equipped for immortality or indestructibility.
    Beautifully put Brodie. However, I would argue that the flaw is in not shutting down trolls quicker.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy Baker (KSC) View Post
    Since Iím one of the authors, Iíll throw in my own $.02. Iíve been training about 24 years. During that time Iíve only had one ďmajor injuryĒ under the bar. Ruptured my distal biceps tendon about 2 1/2 years ago. - so about 22 years into training. Did it on a set of DE Deadlifts. Weight was at 405 which is something Iíve pulled for thousands of reps over the years. Problem wasnít that I went too heavy. Problem was that I didnít respect the load on the bar. I got sloppy and lazy with my technique and allowed some small degree of elbow flexion to creep into the speed pulls. At heavier weights Iím cognizant of what my supinated arm is doing. When the weight feels light and fast I paid less attention to this small detail, and even though 405 was ďrelativelyĒ light at the time (probably about ~65% of 1RM)......itís still 405 lbs. Iíll also say that I distinctly remember ACTIVELY IGNORING a little voice in my head telling me that doing a high volume of speed pulls (I think 6-8x3 that day) with a supinated grip was dumb. My inner voice was telling me to go get my straps. They were in my truck outside, and my laziness won out over my good sense and instincts and I would up in the OR a few days later.

    Donít know if that adds to the conversation but there you go
    I think it is a very good point. I am older, have had two injuries as a direct result of lifting and can honestly say both were due to stupidity. The first was using too much weight and sloppIly trying to do a max rep set. It ended with a minor surgery. The second was with a relatively light weight but I stupidly did it after a grueling day of work, rushed my warmup and was yapping with someone as I did my ďlight dayĒ reps. I knew it was stupid but since I had done it before I was not worried. It ended with a very unpleasant and wholly inconvenient surgery. You have to learn to respect a heavy load no matter how many times you have done it in the past and you have to learn not to ignore the little voice that says maybe this is not a good idea. One of the sad truths is that with age it becomes even more important to train smart, because a stupid set can have a high cost in time, money, and loss of training time. I donít think either of my injuries had anything to do with the program at all. I have had injuries playing basketball with a 10 year old, I have had them with trips and everyday aspects of life. You can get hurt yawning. The real strategy is to do things that improve your strength in an intelligent manner and limit your risk, particularly if you are not competing.

  9. #39
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    Maybe this deserves a different thread, its probably already been asked many times before too.

    Best approach for training with an injury? For example pec tear. My left pec is definitely weak (its been torn). Do I work on making it really strong, or do I work on making its stabilizers really strong?

    (also tore and re-tore my hammy. I guess Im a mess).

  10. #40
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    starting strength coach development program
    Quote Originally Posted by jamies33 View Post
    Maybe this deserves a different thread, its probably already been asked many times before too.
    https://startingstrength.com/resources/forum/forum181/

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