Andrew Lewis: The Materials Science of the Barbell Andrew Lewis: The Materials Science of the Barbell - Page 2

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Thread: Andrew Lewis: The Materials Science of the Barbell

  1. #11
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    • wichita falls texas december seminar 2020
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    The reason I coach the bounce-jerk is not because of the bar whip it produces -- this happens at very heavy weights, not state-meet weights. The bounce-jerk produces a more efficient stretch reflex in the knees and hips than the dip-and-drive jerk.
    That is a valuable clarification. My point still stands about a whip being helpful, though.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Watson View Post
    Various companies in NYC. The last one I was Director of Rigging for an event lighting/audio/video company that also worked with decor, I oversaw all aspects of rigging/safety full time for the entire company for 14 years.
    I became financially independent and left the company back in Nov of '19.

    You need to be in a large city to do any volume of work exclusively rigging. You'll also want an ETCP certification and whatever lift, OSHA, rope access certs you can get. Most riggers I know started as stagehands, lighting, A/V, etc.

    The entire industry is dead right now, due to the way the pandemic is managed; with the closure of all public events and gatherings, except protests/riots.
    I was actually curious about the engineers who consulted for you. I did technical theatre in college, had a work study job in the visual and performing arts department, and helped teach the production lab. My mentors were Local One guys. I took degrees in engineering and in a last ditch effort to avoid growing up, I was looking for a job doing rigging for the stage on the design side.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Satch12879 View Post
    I was actually curious about the engineers who consulted for you. I did technical theatre in college, had a work study job in the visual and performing arts department, and helped teach the production lab. My mentors were Local One guys. I took degrees in engineering and in a last ditch effort to avoid growing up, I was looking for a job doing rigging for the stage on the design side.
    Sorry, misunderstood.
    My main go to engineering firm in NY was MG McLaren which has an entertainment division.
    They are swamped with work in the busy season due to the quality of their work and reputation. Probably the biggest and best, and my favorite to work with. They do a lot Broadway, and many if not most most big gigs in the region.
    You also got Theta Consulting in PA, and Iíve also used Clark Reder out in Ohio.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by m s View Post
    But your argument is not accurate, which you might have realized had you done more olympic lifting.
    I did a few years of Olympic lifting - no competition though.

    Quote Originally Posted by m s View Post
    The primary concern on the jerk is the velocity of the bar as it leaves the shoulders. Do you think a correctly timed jerk with a whip has no impact on that velocity? And if not, wouldn't the dip and drive be favorable given the longer time allowed to accelerate the bar?
    Of course a correctly timed jerk with a whip will increase the free fall velocity off the shoulders. I just don't see a lot of evidence for it actually occurring.



    Quote Originally Posted by m s View Post
    Here, first one I looked at: Naim "Pocket Hercules" Suleymanoglu - YouTube

    Use the ">" key to advance frame-by-frame.
    This resolution isn't fine enough. If you watch the hookgrip videos in 60fps, they appear to rebound in time, but when you watch the higher resolution section, you see the exact same lift is not rebounding in time. I suspect we won't see eye to eye on this matter, but I do see where you're coming from. I'm sure you'll find a video of someone getting damn close and we'll disagree on what we see, but it doesn't matter.

    Let's say you could bounce in time with the bar - it's just a competitive change. If everyone is competing on the same playing field, it doesn't make a difference except that it's an additional part of the technique that must be learned.

    A lifter doesn't fancy new $1000 bar in order to improve their clean and jerk and snatch.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrewLewis View Post
    I suspect we won't see eye to eye on this matter.

    A lifter doesn't fancy new $1000 bar in order to improve their clean and jerk and snatch.
    Well we do agree then, but your article wasn't clear on that. I was just arguing it for fun anyway. It was productive too -- Rip explained why he advocates the bounce jerk which I'm pretty sure he hasn't been explicit about before.

  6. #16
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    I have explained it to everybody I've coached. But nobody else gives a shit about what I think about the jerk, so it doesn't matter.

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