Central Nervous System stress with heavy deadlifts Central Nervous System stress with heavy deadlifts - Page 3

starting strength gym
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 26 of 26

Thread: Central Nervous System stress with heavy deadlifts

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Posts
    115

    Default

    • starting strength seminar april 2021
    • starting strength seminar june 2021
    • starting strength seminar august 2021
    Quote Originally Posted by BastiatBB View Post
    "fenomena"?
    Sorry, english is not my first language

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Garage of GainzZz
    Posts
    2,473

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ReconquistaBarbell View Post
    Not quite. CNS fatigue is an acctual fenomena that is associated with high metabolic stress. pH levels change to a point where signaling from the CNS becomes impaired.

    It however, has nothing to do with what some lifters call "CNS fatigue", which is a way they found to describe the sensation of fatigue that is not immediately associated with muscle soreness.
    Like an epileptic episode.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    130

    Default

    I remember reading Simmonsís stuff about the drawbacks of chronically lifting at over 90% of max and itís purported negative effects on CNS. But if I recall correctly this was in regards to super elite strength athletes with superior genetics and exogenous enhancement. So I assumed it did not apply to my poverty deadlift lol.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    45,096

    Default

    It doesn't apply to theirs either.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    23

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ReconquistaBarbell View Post
    Not quite. CNS fatigue is an acctual fenomena that is associated with high metabolic stress. pH levels change to a point where signaling from the CNS becomes impaired.
    Umm. No. "CNS fatigue" is not an actual phenomenon--at least not a clinical phenomenon observed in living humans. Maybe you can find this term in a third-tier medical journal to describe a general effect in vitro. In the real world there are specific terms for specific states where specific neuron populations or parts of the CNS are metabolically stressed, such as ischemic stroke, toxic or metabolic encephalopathy, or epileptic seizures. Each of these clinical phenomena suggest specific pathology or insult to the homeostasis of the CNS.

    Physical exertion or overexertion in a healthy human does not and cannot produce "CNS fatigue" unless you define it as a psychosomatic phenomenon.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    2,184

    Default

    starting strength coach development program
    Quote Originally Posted by dfclark68 View Post
    Umm. No. "CNS fatigue" is not an actual phenomenon--at least not a clinical phenomenon observed in living humans. Maybe you can find this term in a third-tier medical journal to describe a general effect in vitro. In the real world there are specific terms for specific states where specific neuron populations or parts of the CNS are metabolically stressed, such as ischemic stroke, toxic or metabolic encephalopathy, or epileptic seizures. Each of these clinical phenomena suggest specific pathology or insult to the homeostasis of the CNS.

    Physical exertion or overexertion in a healthy human does not and cannot produce "CNS fatigue" unless you define it as a psychosomatic phenomenon.
    CNS Fatigue is CrossFit speak for "overtraining" or "under-recovery", but the addition of "sciencey" sounding terminology makes it much more interesting than overtraining.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •