Emphasis on Strength as Proxy for Health vs. Muscle? Emphasis on Strength as Proxy for Health vs. Muscle? - Page 3

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Thread: Emphasis on Strength as Proxy for Health vs. Muscle?

  1. #21
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    Dec 2007
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    • starting strength seminar june 2021
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soule View Post
    My experience has been similar.
    Yeah, mine too. Strength is so useful, and the durability that occurs as a result of it is another benefit. It's addicting too. When I had layoffs due to injuries, I remember thinking "as soon as this bone is healed, I'm going to hit the weights and get fucking strong again. It's going to be awesome."

  2. #22
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    May 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrewLewis View Post
    Lifting objects is easier. I got frustrated the other day that we (my wife and I) were having trouble getting a sofa chair up the stairs to our bedroom, so I picked it up like at atlas stone and walked up the stairs. Stuff like that.
    This made me chuckle as it reminded me of the time my wife and I were trying to work out the best way for us to get the piano down the stairs and in the end I just held one end of it onto my thighs and walked down on my own with it. Or the time the carpet people couldn't deliver a bedroom carpet as quickly as I wanted it, so I carried it half a mile on my shoulder. Or the time I lent a hand to the civilian team load testing a ship's lift and needed the 25 kg weights moving and I was picking two of them up by the eyelets in each hand and shuttling them the 20 yards while they struggled with one each or one between 2.

    It is a regular occurrence to be doing stuff like this that isn't all that impressive, yet on reflection most people aren't capable of doing. It's certainty very handy and most people WOULD be capable of doing it, but the fact they don't get themselves in a condition to be able to, perhaps due to a lack of being educated that they can, makes people think I have strength beyond what is reasonably achievable.

  3. #23
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    Mar 2019
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    Yesterday I did something very stupid. After cleaning off the roof of my shed, I decided that jumping onto the lawn was safer than trying to descend on a piece of shit old ladder.

    A 35 year old, 240lb man with a history of sports related injuries, including back surgery, shouldn’t be jumping off 12’ high shit and yet the landing wasn’t hard and nothing hurts. This seems relevant.

  4. #24
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    May 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soule View Post
    Yesterday I did something very stupid. After cleaning off the roof of my shed, I decided that jumping onto the lawn was safer than trying to descend on a piece of shit old ladder.

    A 35 year old, 240lb man with a history of sports related injuries, including back surgery, shouldn’t be jumping off 12’ high shit and yet the landing wasn’t hard and nothing hurts. This seems relevant.
    2 years ago I was 35 and 240lb and decided to show off to my then 11 year old daughter just how amazing I am at climbing cliffs. I was hanging by finger tips, so when I transferred my weight from one foot to another and the bit of sandstone broke off, my finger tips couldn't hang on to my 240 lb and I fell about 12 foot onto a rock right onto my thigh. Absolutely no damage other than some bruising (to my leg and to my ego). I guess two lessons; (1) 240lb men shouldn't think they can climb like they could when they were 150lb and (2) if they are stupid enough to try, at least they're robust enough to get away with a short fall.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    Farmington Hills, MI
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    4,651

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    starting strength coach development program
    Quote Originally Posted by Shiva Kaul View Post
    These observations about internal parameters vs. external outcomes are true, but the question may be more interesting. OP submits that strength is a bad objective to optimize in isolation, since then you will be fat and dead at 55.
    I dispute this. I do not observe this phenomenon, including the death part, in clinical coaching practice. I would find such a result to be suboptimal. I do observe that focusing on quantitative improvements in strength (an easily-measured, useful, and patient-oriented metric) rather than quantitative increase in muscle mass or volume (a more difficult, usually cosmetic, and non-patient oriented metric accept for those with body dysmorphia or bodybuilder syndrome) yields extraordinary health outcomes--including obviously increased muscle mass--and considerable client satisfaction. YMMV, but I see no reason to change my practice at present.

    POOs FTW.

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