Rip: When to Stop Trying to Train Rip: When to Stop Trying to Train

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Thread: Rip: When to Stop Trying to Train

  1. #1
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  2. #2
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    This is a sad day. I'd like to pay my respects. Is Stef handling the arrangements or is Delgadillo? Or will you just let the dogs eat you and scatter the bones?

  3. #3
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    Feb 2020
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    Thanks Rip for the article. I'm not there yet but I've wondered for a while how I should be setting my expectations as I get older. It's helpful to not just know what to expect, but also the right attitude to have about it. I turned 40 last month and I've been thinking a lot about my folks and their own experience with aging. It scares me, but at the same time I know there is something I can do about it. To be honest, before I started lifting and reading about other, older lifters, I had no idea how strong you could be as you age. It's really pretty amazing!

  4. #4
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    Oct 2015
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    I think what may be relevant is that while you can stop training certain lifts because of repeated injury it doesnít necessarily mean you canít make progress on others.

  5. #5
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    Feb 2020
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Z View Post
    .
    I turned 40 last month and I've been thinking a lot about my folks and their own experience with aging. It scares me, but at the same time I know there is something I can do about it. To be honest, before I started lifting and reading about other, older lifters, I had no idea how strong you could be as you age. It's really pretty amazing!
    I was my strongest in my early-mid 40's. You have lots of time.

  6. #6
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    I'm just curios if you can plan a schedule and stick to it. I'm 57, training intensely since 2013. I PR'd my lifts in 2018, and not expecting to surpass those lifetime PRs, by I will follow your sage advice to keep cycling training to reach local PRs. But I find myself having to re plan my workouts almost continually. Ideally I plan three workouts a week, one heavy (Friday), one light (Sunday), and one medium with volume (Tuesday). But if I miss my Sunday workout because I'm too drained or overworked, I'll aim to do the Medium w/volume on Monday followed by a light workout on Wednesday. And then if I miss also Monday, I'll aim for an intense medium w/volume on Tuesday followed by recovery until Friday.
    But also even when I make it to the workout, I often find an injury or weak body part will force me to change the focus and plan of that workout. So often am I forced to readjust to the situation at hand, that I marvel at your article that gives the impression that you stick to a set plan without wavering. Do you really manage that way, or was that sort of skipped over in this article?

  7. #7
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    I travel a lot, especially in summer, so my schedule is always varied. But the general idea is 3x/week.

  8. #8
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    starting strength coach development program
    Quote Originally Posted by dalan View Post
    I was my strongest in my early-mid 40's. You have lots of time.
    I'm 51 and the strongest Ive EVER been - and I started lifting at age 14 in the garage. Progress is slow and steady, but I still progress. Anyone who peaks in their 20s is a fucking loser.

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