SS Radio #104: The Big Lie and Self-Sufficiency SS Radio #104: The Big Lie and Self-Sufficiency - Page 2

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Thread: SS Radio #104: The Big Lie and Self-Sufficiency

  1. #11
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    • starting strength seminar june 2021
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    I have had a standby generator here nw of Houston for many years. It is invaluable for all the power outages we have here - hurricanes , storms and recently the big freeze.

    I would add guns and ammo to the list of must have items. Hunting rifle w/scope, AR-15, shotgun, handguns. Pick the most available calibers .308, .223, 9mm 12ga and .22.

    I wouldn't give my credit card info to a spam caller from Canada to get drugs.

  2. #12
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    Anybody have any recommended readings on becoming more self-sufficient?

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete K View Post
    I wouldn't give my credit card info to a spam caller from Canada to get drugs.
    Then you can't get the "drugs."

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nathan M View Post
    Anybody have any recommended readings on becoming more self-sufficient?
    Young people still respond to My Side of the Mountain, (Newberry Medal runner-up, by Jean Craighead George, published 1959), so you can read it out loud to them for inspiration. I know Coach Rippetoe would endorse exiting a New York City apartment for a former farm in the Catskills, along with the love of venison shown in the book.

    My Side of the Mountain by Jean George: VERY GOOD Paperback (1975) | OwlsBooks

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nathan M View Post
    Anybody have any recommended readings on becoming more self-sufficient?
    Before any answer can be forthcoming, just what do you mean by “Self-sufficient” It could be applied to everything from being able to survive comfortable for three days post storm event to building your own Farmham's Freehold. While Rip only covered a small number of items in his self-sufficiency, he appears to be leaning towards Farmham's :-)

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald Boggs View Post
    Before any answer can be forthcoming, just what do you mean by “Self-sufficient” It could be applied to everything from being able to survive comfortable for three days post storm event to building your own Farmham's Freehold. :-)
    "Self-sufficient: needing no outside help in satisfying one's basic needs, especially with regard to the production of food."

    That is what I mean. I assume that is also what was meant when it was used in the title of the podcast. If you want me to get more specific, I would say that in the absence of governments/private companies/charity, I would like to be able to continue living, and with some sort of quality of life. I listened to the podcast which covered some general information, but where would one go to learn about these subjects further? I understand this is not something that can be covered in an hour and a half podcast, which is why I figured a collection of readings would be a more comprehensive source of information for someone wanting to become educated on this topic.

    Any and all recommendations are appreciated, as long as the subject matter fits the general topics of this thread. I am just a young person looking to move into a more self-sufficient way of life.

  7. #17
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    A vacuum packing machine and a sous vide are nice additions to the kitchen. I own the Food Saver model that has two sealing elements so you can make bags out of roll stock while packing. It's more expensive but it doubles throughput. I can put a frozen steak in the sous vide in the morning before I work out and sear it when I finish. If you have a kid that's in a funk I've found that providing steak for breakfast can work wonders.

    I like to purchase boxes of sirloins and strip loins that I cut into steaks, vacuum pack, and refreeze. My last box of strips had 8 pieces at a little over 10 pounds apiece. I buy them from a local retailer/wholesaler that I used to sell hogs to, and he sources them from National Beef. If I'm willing to wait a couple weeks I can order and receive either Select, Choice, or Prime. Prime is usually a dollar more than Select, and sometimes I question the USDA grade on some of the cuts. However, at least I have 8 cuts to spread my risk as opposed to being stuck with a single animal that I might fatten. I'm currently working on a box of Choice strip loins and they cost about $9/lb. A 1.25" thick steak usually comes out to 19-20 oz, so you know they are coming out of rather large cattle.

    Having a battery operated thermometer with an alarm is a necessary addition to the chest freezer.

    The book "Country Wisdom and Know How" provides a nice entry into many things self sufficient.

    It never hurts to have a food source "on the hoof" if you have the property for it. Even better is if you have a buddy with property (and a boat).

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nathan M View Post
    "Self-sufficient: needing no outside help in satisfying one's basic needs, especially with regard to the production of food."
    The thing is, is nobody is really self-sufficient. At best they're less depended on outside sources and/or stockpile in such quantities, that they can go years without resupply.
    There's a large number of books and magazines on general self-sufficiency, homesteading and post-collapse of government. Some quite good and many quite bad, only common sense and experience will help you tell the difference. A couple of the general self-sufficiency and homesteading magazines are Grit and Mother Earth News Both are a mix of good and bad, but for the inexperienced person, there's enough good to out-weight the bad. Believe it or not, State and University Ag web sites are full of useful bits, but just like the magazines, also plenty of not so useful. Off the grid web sites are full of advice and links to Amazon to help you spend your money. RV lifestyle and live-aboard are places to look.

    But if I may be so bold as to offer advice, here it is: To keep from being overwhelmed, start small. What do you need to survive in comfort for three days and build from there. Every state emergency readiness site and the Red Cross are brimming with information and lists. If you camp, hunt or hike, it's likely you already have almost everything you need, it just might not be organized for home use. When you think you're ready, spend a weekend pretending you have no power. From there, you can build up to generators, water supplies and solar panel systems.

    For most of us, a degree of food self-sufficiency is going to equal gardening and maybe chickens. Again start small, Tomatoes are a good plant to start with. Just get a tray from your local garden center and stick them in the ground. Then start asking and answering all the questions you'll need to be successful. Eating fresh vs canning. Determinate or indeterminate tomatoes. Cage, stakes or strings for support. Heck, you can just let them spread out on the ground, but you'll lose some to the slugs and they take up a lot of ground. You'll have to do this with every plant or animal you add as you grow in self-sufficiency, but at some point you'll have the experience to tell the difference between good and bad advice.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald Boggs View Post
    Before any answer can be forthcoming, just what do you mean by “Self-sufficient” It could be applied to everything from being able to survive comfortable for three days post storm event to building your own Farmham's Freehold. While Rip only covered a small number of items in his self-sufficiency, he appears to be leaning towards Farmham's :-)
    Yes, I agree. For instance, becoming self-sufficient in the face of a greater or lesser degree of societal collapse (whether temporary, e.g. Hurricane Katrina, or longer term) is different from becoming un-cancellable. The former suggests having stocks of food and other emergency supplies, the latter might have more to do with your income source, web privacy/anonymity, that kind of thing. Having a vegetable garden might make you more self-sufficient in some sense, but isn't going to help you face either Hurricane Katrina or being cancelled.

    Then there's the level of not just being self-sufficient, but being politically organized. Travis McMichael and Greg McMichael were self-sufficient: they had a pickup truck and guns and when they suspected Ahmaud Arbery of crime in their neighborhood, they went right out and self-sufficiently confronted him. They are still in jail awaiting trial I believe. The crazy left has friendly prosecutors (elected by big-money donations from billionaires, in many cases), bail funds, legal defense organizations, all sorts of friendly media, and huge influence within major corporations. They have a whole infrastructure. The right is sitting back pointing out leftist hypocrisy and craziness and waiting for people to rise up spontaneously. (By rise up I vote, boycott, write letters to elected officials, protest, and take other legal political action.) That does not happen, for the most part, without organization and infrastructure.

    I am scared by the direction the country is going and I would love to make my voice heard. Also I feel isolated in general and would like to associate with like-minded people. But I don't know of any local groups I could join. If I was on the progressive left I am sure I could join half a dozen local groups tomorrow.

  10. #20
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    starting strength coach development program
    Been thinking of moving out to the country after listening to this one. Is it weird that one of my primary concerns about construction materials is how bullet proof they are?

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