Squat-Stance Deadlift, an alternative to Back Squat? Squat-Stance Deadlift, an alternative to Back Squat? - Page 2

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Thread: Squat-Stance Deadlift, an alternative to Back Squat?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fleischman View Post
    The bottom and the top positions in the Squat-Stance (no Sumo Stance) Deadlift are the same as in the SSBBT3 Squat. Doesn't that mean the the ranges of motion of the Squat-Stance Deadlift and the SSBBT3 Squat are the same?
    I'm going to treat this as if it's not a troll.

    The top and bottom positions of those lifts with any weight on the bar would not and more importantly cannot be the same. First of all, this is just a sumo deadlift. Even a sumo deadlift, done efficiently, still doesn't look like a squat. Pulling mechanics are a lot different than squatting mechanics. Read this article (or the deadlift chapter) and report back: Deadlift Mechanics:The Obvious Can Be Obscure | Mark Rippetoe

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fleischman View Post
    The bottom and the top positions in the Squat-Stance (no Sumo Stance) Deadlift are the same as in the SSBBT3 Squat. Doesn't that mean the the ranges of motion of the Squat-Stance Deadlift and the SSBBT3 Squat are the same?
    No, they are not. It's very easy to see, the depth at the bottom of this deadlift variant shown is not identical to a below-parallel squat. This is really just a less efficient sumo deadlift. The stance is in a little bit from what is usually done for sumo, and the arms are crowded in as a result, leading to one awkward looking lockout. Honestly, with the arms in like that and the elbows in front of the body like that, it could put the elbows in danger if you use heavy weight. The premise the guy explains for the benefit of these is also flawed. Conventional deadlifts and squats have enormous amounts of carryover between each other, no modifications necessary. This is why starting strength only uses a single work set for deadlifts. Squats, especially the low bar, share a lot of stresses with deadlifts, particularly the low back. I've actually been able to sustain volume deadlifting and get a good training effect from it during a period where I wasn't squatting heavy. But once the squats started to get back to being heavy, the back was getting overworked. I did not watch the second video, but I would encourage a lot of skepticism from any lifting advice given by the man in the first one.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fleischman View Post
    Please donít take advice on range of motion (or anything, really) from Joel Seedman.

  4. #14
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    I would say you should superset your squat stance deadlifts with Jefferson deadlifts. Make sure your pre workout drink is homeopathic because these supersets are killer.

  5. #15
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    Fleischmann, why didn't you include the very next sentence from the blue book where you're quoting the "leg exercise" thing? It answers your question. I'll save you the trouble:

    "First, some general observations about the deadlift, in no particular order. It can be used as a leg exercise if injury prevents squatting. It is not nearly as effective as the squat for this purpose, due to the lack of hip depth used in the starting position (Figure 4-3, top). But this is the very reason it can be used if a knee or hip injury makes squats too difficult or painful, and at least some leg work can be done while healing takes place."

    The video you posted is a sumo stance, regardless of what he calls it. And it's a shitty one because the toes forward limits the adductors' contribution to the movement. Watch Ed Coan pull sumo and compare. Regardless, the range of motion is not the same as the squat, in fact CAN'T be the same as the squat, regardless of the stance width. But the guy who made that video literally thinks that a half squat is optimal depth so in his case the range of motion might actually be similar between the two.

  6. #16
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    This is really pointless. No more responses will be posted.

  7. #17
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    starting strength coach development program
    Thank you every one whose comments helped me understand where I was mistaken.

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