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Thread: Colonoscopy

  1. #31
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    Cologuard uses PCR technology...our old friend from the Covid PCR tests. Remember we learned that Cycle Threshold of covid tests were too high in order to generate lots of false positives. Cologuard's specific Cycle Threshold is not public information. The literature states that cologuard's false positive rate is 13%. That's too high for me, and it's looking like a gateway test to get healthy, asymptomatic people in for colonoscopy procedure.

    Here are some stats regarding the risks of colonoscopy.

    The colonoscopy perforation rate apparently is 1 in 1000 procedures, which might not sound like a lot, but when you compare it to the rates of colorectal cancer, it's fairly significant. And then there are serious complications in 5 out of every 1000 colonoscopies.

    Taking lessons learned from Covid (as well as Statins), adverse effects tend to be underreported for all the reasons we learned in the last few years.

    Also, the endoscopes have these cavities that are inaccessible to being cleaned completely by hand. So, infections are possible. These infections are potentially underreported since some may be low-grade...possibly long-term low grade infections.

    And then another problem is that one of the common sterilizers they use for colonoscopies, which is called glutaraldehyde, has actually been shown to cause pseudomembranous colitis itself. This might explain why some people actually develop colitis after having a colonoscopy.

    Many of these adverse effects are difficult to trace back to the procedure. Thus, we all walk into these colonoscopy procedures thinking it's a walk in the park. It usually is, but more often than you think...it's not.

    I think a colonoscopy is the only cancer screening test that requires you to go under general to have it, and general anesthesia definitely can cause some problems for some people — deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, kidney damage, electrolyte imbalance, and a few other not-so-nice things. Those are very rare, but since we're talking about the risk, it's worth pointing out.

    I copied much of the above from an old Chris Kresser 2013 interview: RHR: The Saturated Fat – Heart Disease Myth, Colonoscopy Health Risks, and Intermittent Fasting

    In that interview, Chris also states: "There was another study in the Annals of Internal Medicine that showed that 70,000 or 0.5% of people who get colonoscopies are either injured or killed by complications related to the procedure. And that figure is 22% higher than annual deaths from colorectal cancer."

    According to Chatgpt: "In a review from 2016, the mortality rate from colonoscopies was found to range from 0.007% to 0.07%. Another meta-analysis cited a mortality rate of 2.9 per 100,000 (95% confidence interval: 1.1-5.5)."

    Also, Chatgpt reports: "As of 2022, the colonoscopy market in the United States was valued at approximately $2.4 billion, and it is projected to reach $3.8 billion by 2030."

    For people with no family history, good lifestyle, good overall health, and no symptoms...it's useful to consider the above info.

    Whenever you see the system pushing something like this procedure on EVERYONE, there's usually lots of money involved and another hidden side to the story.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kitsuma View Post
    I think a colonoscopy is the only cancer screening test that requires you to go under general to have it, and general anesthesia definitely can cause some problems for some people — deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, kidney damage, electrolyte imbalance, and a few other not-so-nice things. Those are very rare, but since we're talking about the risk, it's worth pointing out.

    Whenever you see the system pushing something like this procedure on EVERYONE, there's usually lots of money involved and another hidden side to the story.
    Colonoscopies normally use Conscious Sedation which is not General Anesthesia, it is lighter sedation.

    Brooklyn Jerry, talk to friends and ask if they have a GI doc they would recommend for a Colonoscopy. Every medical procedure has risks, especially the older one is. Soft tissues become softer, leading to potential perforations.

    I'm 58. I am an ICU nurse and have been for 17 years. I do not wish to have colorectal cancer at this point in my life. Will I get one after 80 YO, probably not. Will I get one after 70 YO, we'll see. I've had three of them over the last approx. 10 years. The most challenging thing for me is the prep. You "go" until it's clear. Work up an ROI on it and make your decision. Please keep us updated.

  3. #33
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    Thanks for the input. I am leaning towards getting it done. My son who is 48 has Cronhs disease and get one every 2.years so I know about the.prep thing.

  4. #34
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    I had a colonoscopy today. As far as consent, highest procedural risk is the light anesthesia. Followed by perforation. One polyp removed and being biopsied.

    I learned that the general GI community no longer cautions against eating little seeds like strawberries and cucumbers. They just have not seen a correlation with GI problems in the general public and are big big advocates of colon health through diet, as am I.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry Charles View Post
    I learned that the general GI community no longer cautions against eating little seeds like strawberries and cucumbers. They just have not seen a correlation with GI problems in the general public and are big big advocates of colon health through diet, as am I.
    Yes, My mother’s cousin has a bad history of diverticulitis; he’s eaten kiwi almost daily for decades intentionally to manage it. No flare ups anymore.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yngvi View Post
    Hmmmm....let's see.
    As an asymptomatic individual under the age of 65 with no family history of bowel cancer, I can choose between:
    1. Approximately a .001% chance I have cancer that could be detected and treated early.

    Slightly off topic - I got offered a PSA test last week as part of the annual medical screening by my employer. Only due to my age, no symptoms.

    After what I'd read on here, and listening to a podcast on screening I found this link

    They use "number needed to treat" as their metric for deciding whether a test is worth having or not. The PSA test got a Black Rating which means "Therapies rated black have very clear harms without any benefit."

    I think I'll skip it.


    FYI - Colonoscopy got a green rating.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by gadders View Post
    Slightly off topic - I got offered a PSA test last week as part of the annual medical screening by my employer. Only due to my age, no symptoms.

    After what I'd read on here, and listening to a podcast on screening I found this link

    They use "number needed to treat" as their metric for deciding whether a test is worth having or not. The PSA test got a Black Rating which means "Therapies rated black have very clear harms without any benefit."

    I think I'll skip it.


    FYI - Colonoscopy got a green rating.
    Two interesting points to note for their nnt colonoscopy analysis:
    1. Their observed complication rate was much lower than is reported elsewhere in the literature.
    2. They concluded that all-cause mortality was not reduced as a result of the procedures.

  8. #38
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    starting strength coach development program
    Thanks for the input. I'm having a shoulder issue now and have put the coloniscopy on hold.

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