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Thread: Me and Racculia: Going to College or Not

  1. #1
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    Default Me and Racculia: Going to College or Not

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    A PE degree not qualification enough? But, but, but.... what about.... credentials? - most of the intelligentsia, likely.

    The financial planning piece is quite important. An investing site I frequent once had an article about personal debt, and in the comments someone said there should be more personal financial teaching in schools, to which someone replied "Personal financial planning will teach people to become self-reliant and not dependent on the government. The government schools are not in the business of creating those kinds of people." Just another outcropping from the push to have the administrative class set "standards" and credentialize the world.

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    Are there real people with sociology degrees working at Starbucks, or is it a trope? I happen to know multiple sociology majors, they all work for multinationals. Medium level salary, but I think at least five hundred dollars above the mean Starbucks one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jovan Dragisic View Post
    Are there real people with sociology degrees working at Starbucks, or is it a trope? I happen to know multiple sociology majors, they all work for multinationals. Medium level salary, but I think at least five hundred dollars above the mean Starbucks one.
    The gag in the States is if you have any kind of arts degree, performing or fine, youíre almost guaranteed to have passed through one at least until you needed to move back home.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jovan Dragisic View Post
    Are there real people with sociology degrees working at Starbucks, or is it a trope? I happen to know multiple sociology majors, they all work for multinationals. Medium level salary, but I think at least five hundred dollars above the mean Starbucks one.
    There are, but we also have real people with engineering degrees and MBAs working as baristas at Starbucks.
    This is not by choice; nobody wants to work at a Starbucks.

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    Great article, a few points to add. I spent approximately 10 years associated with multiple universities. Through a PhD and a post-doc, so some experience to share on the pitfalls to avoid.

    If you are even a little bright in high school and think the hard sciences are a track you want to end up in, the system can be gamed so you end up getting paid to go to college and never have to even consider signing a loan. This is what I did - graduate with a B.S. debt free and get paid to obtain graduate degrees through assistantships.

    Begin in high school. Study whatever standardized test is popular at the time. For me it was the ACT. I took it at least 8 times until I had a score high enough to be offered a 4 year tuition waver. Then apply your ass off for every available scholarship to cover fees and living expenses. If you are short, then consider on campus employment related to your studies (I worked in a genetics lab).

    Then repeat for graduate education if you so choose to extend your stay. Seek out assistantships offered by graduate programs that cover tuition, health insurance, and a living stipend. Under no circumstances should you take out a loan. If you seriously apply yourself and come up short, maybe itís time to find a big boy job and enter the industry.

    If you are not brighter than the average 18 year old mouth breather focused on beer and chasing tail, maybe college isnít for you. This redneck from the south figured it out, and I think more people should consider this a viable option if they begin the process in high school.

    Under no circumstances should you consider a career in academia. Industry pay in the hard sciences can get you 3x what a university will pay you to babysit 19 year olds and scratch away at paltry grant funding to pay for your shitty research ideas. Industry is a better life. If you are bright and have some balls, find a way to work for yourself.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwbucha View Post
    Great article, a few points to add. I spent approximately 10 years associated with multiple universities. Through a PhD and a post-doc, so some experience to share on the pitfalls to avoid.

    If you are even a little bright in high school and think the hard sciences are a track you want to end up in, the system can be gamed so you end up getting paid to go to college and never have to even consider signing a loan. This is what I did - graduate with a B.S. debt free and get paid to obtain graduate degrees through assistantships.

    Begin in high school. Study whatever standardized test is popular at the time. For me it was the ACT. I took it at least 8 times until I had a score high enough to be offered a 4 year tuition waver. Then apply your ass off for every available scholarship to cover fees and living expenses. If you are short, then consider on campus employment related to your studies (I worked in a genetics lab).

    Then repeat for graduate education if you so choose to extend your stay. Seek out assistantships offered by graduate programs that cover tuition, health insurance, and a living stipend. Under no circumstances should you take out a loan. If you seriously apply yourself and come up short, maybe it’s time to find a big boy job and enter the industry.

    If you are not brighter than the average 18 year old mouth breather focused on beer and chasing tail, maybe college isn’t for you. This redneck from the south figured it out, and I think more people should consider this a viable option if they begin the process in high school.

    Under no circumstances should you consider a career in academia. Industry pay in the hard sciences can get you 3x what a university will pay you to babysit 19 year olds and scratch away at paltry grant funding to pay for your shitty research ideas. Industry is a better life. If you are bright and have some balls, find a way to work for yourself.
    Post of the Week. Contact Bre at the store for your t-Shirt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jwbucha View Post
    Great article, a few points to add. I spent approximately 10 years associated with multiple universities. Through a PhD and a post-doc, so some experience to share on the pitfalls to avoid.

    If you are even a little bright in high school and think the hard sciences are a track you want to end up in, the system can be gamed so you end up getting paid to go to college and never have to even consider signing a loan. This is what I did - graduate with a B.S. debt free and get paid to obtain graduate degrees through assistantships.

    Begin in high school. Study whatever standardized test is popular at the time. For me it was the ACT. I took it at least 8 times until I had a score high enough to be offered a 4 year tuition waver. Then apply your ass off for every available scholarship to cover fees and living expenses. If you are short, then consider on campus employment related to your studies (I worked in a genetics lab).

    Then repeat for graduate education if you so choose to extend your stay. Seek out assistantships offered by graduate programs that cover tuition, health insurance, and a living stipend. Under no circumstances should you take out a loan. If you seriously apply yourself and come up short, maybe itís time to find a big boy job and enter the industry.

    If you are not brighter than the average 18 year old mouth breather focused on beer and chasing tail, maybe college isnít for you. This redneck from the south figured it out, and I think more people should consider this a viable option if they begin the process in high school.

    Under no circumstances should you consider a career in academia. Industry pay in the hard sciences can get you 3x what a university will pay you to babysit 19 year olds and scratch away at paltry grant funding to pay for your shitty research ideas. Industry is a better life. If you are bright and have some balls, find a way to work for yourself.
    I just want to know what college will give you free tuition for a high enough SAT/ACT score.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yngvi View Post
    There are, but we also have real people with engineering degrees and MBAs working as baristas at Starbucks.
    This is not by choice; nobody wants to work at a Starbucks.
    So it probably has a lot to do with where you live. I donít know, I see these humanities majors finding work easily. Not just sociology majors, but people who study strange things like librarianship or culturology, whatever that is. The universities in Croatia are mostly government subsidized (ďfreeĒ), so I guess the return on investment is different. They still make far less than a good plumber or electrician.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Satch12879 View Post
    I just want to know what college will give you free tuition for a high enough SAT/ACT score.
    I think this is common. Oklahoma calls it the State Regents Academic Scholars Program. An example is here:

    ou.edu/admissions/affordability/scholarships

    I donít know what tuition costs today, but in 2007 this amounted to a full tuition waiver. I think itís the same today. Being a National Merit Finalist on the SAT is an equivalent scholarship and amounts to free tuition at many institutions nation wide.

    This has nothing to do with intelligence, and everything to do with figuring out how to game the standardized testing program. I figured this out while almost simultaneously being kicked out of a boarding school for failing to grasp multivariate calculus. It can be done.

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