Recovery - workload, intensity, volume Recovery - workload, intensity, volume

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Thread: Recovery - workload, intensity, volume

  1. #1
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    Default Recovery - workload, intensity, volume

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    Hmm, just wondering what exactly is responsible for forcing the adaptation to make one stronger. I know that workload, intensit and volume probably all play a role, but is there a certain line that must be crossed in order to be enough to cause an adaptation with sufficient recovery?

    (Just to check, volume is the number of reps done altogether in a workout right?)

    I'm inclined to think it's based on intensity the most with volume and workload playing a lesser role (like affecting the rate of recovery from that workout). But then if it was only about intensity, then someone could then still improve strength just by doing 1 set of 1RM every workout. So is there also a certain line that must be crossed in terms of volume and workload?

  2. #2
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    I thought you said you had read the books...

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    Quote Originally Posted by confuzzl3don3 View Post
    (Just to check, volume is the number of reps done altogether in a workout right?)
    The volume is the total amount of weight in a workout. E.g., The volume of 3 work sets with 5 reps at 300 pounds is 4500 pounds.

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    Confuzzled, this is ALL covered in Practical Programming, both editions I assure you.

    -S.

  5. #5
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    Really, can you point out the page numbers. All i could find was stuff on requiring sufficient workload to force an adaptation. Didn't seem to find much on the other stuff. I probably just missed something so if its in PP 1st ed, can you point out the page numbers i should look at, thanks

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    Partly, it's the tension placed on the muscles--mechanical stress and deformation of the muscle tissue--that sends a chemical signal to the muscle cell nucleus to upregulate protein synthesis. If there are amino acids made available to the muscle by way of diet, guess what happens to those aminos when protein synthesis goes up?

    Next time, just apply more tension than before (increase the load) and the same thing happens.

    Plug this into what you already knew from Practical Programming and you should have a rough answer to your question.

    -Stacey
    Last edited by nisora33; 01-24-2010 at 09:16 PM.

  7. #7
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    Confuzzled... you sound like my friend in university that always asked me if I found the solution in a book... he just didn't understand that he had to sit down, use some brain-power, and just do the fucking assignment.
    I've seen some of your posts and videos, and I think your head is fucking with you... not that I'm Sigmund Freud or anything.
    Your lifts look very (...trying to find the best word...) timid, like you are scared. And your changing to immediate programming after only so many months on novice, seems strange... just like my friend; searching for some magic formula that will instantly bring a 30kg increase.

    I suggest you go back to novice, eat everything in sight, and when you train, find some intensity; tell your girlfriend her ass is getting big, kick your beloved dog, put a small stone in your shoes for pain, crank-up some Metallica, and just do it.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by tennisgod View Post
    Confuzzled... you sound like my friend in university that always asked me if I found the solution in a book... he just didn't understand that he had to sit down, use some brain-power, and just do the fucking assignment.
    I've seen some of your posts and videos, and I think your head is fucking with you... not that I'm Sigmund Freud or anything.
    Your lifts look very (...trying to find the best word...) timid, like you are scared. And your changing to immediate programming after only so many months on novice, seems strange... just like my friend; searching for some magic formula that will instantly bring a 30kg increase.

    I suggest you go back to novice, eat everything in sight, and when you train, find some intensity; tell your girlfriend her ass is getting big, kick your beloved dog, put a small stone in your shoes for pain, crank-up some Metallica, and just do it.
    EXCELLENT advice, TG.

    -S.

  9. #9
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    Make sure its pre-90's Metallica as well.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by confuzzl3don3 View Post
    Hmm, just wondering what exactly is responsible for forcing the adaptation to make one stronger. I know that workload, intensit and volume probably all play a role, but is there a certain line that must be crossed in order to be enough to cause an adaptation with sufficient recovery?

    (Just to check, volume is the number of reps done altogether in a workout right?)

    I'm inclined to think it's based on intensity the most with volume and workload playing a lesser role (like affecting the rate of recovery from that workout). But then if it was only about intensity, then someone could then still improve strength just by doing 1 set of 1RM every workout. So is there also a certain line that must be crossed in terms of volume and workload?
    I feel bad answering this because I think the STFU and go lift answer is best, but I'm too drunk to care.

    Intensity is always the critical factor, while volume is the modulator of intensity's effect.

    Volume alone means nothing because marathoners don't grow or get stronger and their volume is as high as it gets.

    Intensity of work is what creates an effect, but if you only do one rep at 90% and go home, it's not much of an effect. Intensity is a necessary, but not always sufficient, cause of training effects. It must be there, but by itself it's not always enough to stimulate improvements.

    Once a sufficient intensity is created, volume becomes the primary determinant of the training effect.

    To summarize: if you aren't lifting a heavy enough weight, all the volume in the world is pointless. If you are lifting a heavy enough weight, then volume is what will make the difference in effect (positive or negative).

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