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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cheesepuff View Post
    A drop of anti bacterial hand soap in a glass of warm water.
    It gets pretty nasty in there quickly apparently. And my breathing is better all the time.
    Plain warm water wasn't gittin 'er dun.

    I've had several broken noses. Talking when I should have been listening.
    !
    Antibacterial soap is a hormone disruptor that actually works to increase estrogen like activity in your body.

  2. #12
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    Apr 2016
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    Chicago Burbs, IL
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    Quote Originally Posted by OZ-USF-UFGator View Post
    Antibacterial soap is a hormone disruptor that actually works to increase estrogen like activity in your body.
    WHOA!!!! Half a dozen google searches and I'm done doing this. RIGHT NOW.
    Thanks!

  3. #13
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    Jan 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by OZ-USF-UFGator View Post
    Antibacterial soap is a hormone disruptor that actually works to increase estrogen like activity in your body.
    *fulcrum rubs bacteria all over his naked body*

  4. #14
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    Apr 2016
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    Chicago Burbs, IL
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    Update: The hand soap we used to use had Triclosan. The current stuff does not. So back to using soap to clean my nose... my breathing has been more labored.

    BUT... my Crest toothpaste does have Triclosan. (aka that hormone distruptor above / mimics estrogen activities). I have switched to Pepsodent.
    * not all versions of Crest have it, but the one I used did.

  5. #15
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    Feb 2017
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    Charlottesville VA
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    If you are having symptoms, get a good doctor who will run blood screens and check your vitamin and mineral levels as well as your thyroid. Also examine other issues in your life. If you have low vitamin levels, address those. Get that kind of thing sorted out, and if your levels warrant it, and you are comfortable with it, get on TRT. If it makes a difference and you feel better, then why wouldn't you?

  6. #16
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    Nov 2013
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    Texas
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    This article will answer a lot of questions about TRT for older men: Testosterone replacement therapy for older men

  7. #17
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    Apr 2017
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    mountains out west
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    Quote Originally Posted by tompaynter View Post
    Interesting. So does that mean you've more or less committed to testosterone replacement for life? Did you try or consider trying something like Clomid first, which if I understand correctly doesn't shut down one's own testosterone production?
    Yes. My body doesn't produce Test anymore so adding it via injection is the only option. My wife is on Thyroid meds for the rest of her life too, it is the same thing really.

  8. #18
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    Apr 2017
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    mountains out west
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    Quote Originally Posted by PizzaDad View Post
    If you are having symptoms, get a good doctor who will run blood screens and check your vitamin and mineral levels as well as your thyroid. Also examine other issues in your life. If you have low vitamin levels, address those. Get that kind of thing sorted out, and if your levels warrant it, and you are comfortable with it, get on TRT. If it makes a difference and you feel better, then why wouldn't you?
    Can't agree with this more. There are so many factors that could impact your health that it is completely impossible to self-diagnose without blood tests and monitoring, on a regular basis, to understand what's going on. Our capacity to self-diagnose boils down to knowing that something is wrong. Getting help figuring it out can help stave off years of trouble and red herrings.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
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    One more thing which may be relevant to searching for a TRT doc: in general, endocrinologists are overwhelmed with type 2 diabetes patients and my personal experience is that urologists are not really trained in hormone replacement therapy. There is a growing number of docs who specialize in hormone replacement therapies for our aging population. It took me going to four different doctors (two endo's and two urologists) who were clearly not interested or not trained in TRT before I found a doc who did nothing but hormone replacement for adults. His main goal is bringing your T back to late 20's/early 30's levels, not, in my case, average 60 year old levels. He used blood tests AND anecdotal evidence from me to develop a program. That program only had two prescriptions medicines: testosterone and armidex (estrogen blocker). There are a bunch of supplements, vitamin D and B, thyroid supplements (mostly iodine), arginine, etc. Blood test results every three months for the first year AND actual results as told by me led to adjustments (upping armidex dose, going from one a week to once every 5 days for T injections).

    Take the time to search for the right doc. It probably will not be paid for by insurance, but it's the second best investment in yourself you'll ever make. The first being get strong. Of course.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Philly burbs, USA
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    644

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    Quote Originally Posted by rgcone View Post
    One more thing which may be relevant to searching for a TRT doc: in general, endocrinologists are overwhelmed with type 2 diabetes patients and my personal experience is that urologists are not really trained in hormone replacement therapy. There is a growing number of docs who specialize in hormone replacement therapies for our aging population. It took me going to four different doctors (two endo's and two urologists) who were clearly not interested or not trained in TRT before I found a doc who did nothing but hormone replacement for adults. His main goal is bringing your T back to late 20's/early 30's levels, not, in my case, average 60 year old levels. He used blood tests AND anecdotal evidence from me to develop a program. That program only had two prescriptions medicines: testosterone and armidex (estrogen blocker). There are a bunch of supplements, vitamin D and B, thyroid supplements (mostly iodine), arginine, etc. Blood test results every three months for the first year AND actual results as told by me led to adjustments (upping armidex dose, going from one a week to once every 5 days for T injections).

    Take the time to search for the right doc. It probably will not be paid for by insurance, but it's the second best investment in yourself you'll ever make. The first being get strong. Of course.
    For what its worth, Ive seen all the questions stop after a patient said Ive been lifting weights competitively for a while and my numbers started to go down with a blood test out of range.

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