Do Carbs Make You Tired? Do Carbs Make You Tired?

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Thread: Do Carbs Make You Tired?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
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    Default Do Carbs Make You Tired?

    Keto and other low carb diets are all the rage now, and you hear a lot about how bad carbs are, or how they make you tired, or the worse I've heard "Carbs are poison". I eat a lot of carbs as of now per my coach and haven't really narrowed down a correlation to energy levels during the day and carb intake. Is there any truth scientifically to carbs taking more energy to process, making you lethargic etc? Does it have more to do with the quality/source of the carb? I am not very knowledgeable about the nutrition side of things.

    I am new to the forum but thought I'd give a little background. I'm 23, had never really lifted until last year (except going through the 20 rep max "Super Squat Program" for a couple of months when I was 17...and had NO idea how to squat) but have been through LP (3 months on my own from the SS book, 6 months with a coach, still currently coached) and am now moving into intermediate programming.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    Phoenix, AZ
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    Default

    Joe,

    There is so much misinformation on carbohydrates and energy metabolism and I speculate that part of this is due to the fact that removing carbohydrates from the food supplly is far easier than removing fat from the food supply. Again purely speculative but try going on a low fat diet and a low carbohydrate diet and see which one is easier to navigate in all scenarios.

    To answer your question, if you eat high glycemic index carbohydrates (e.g. sugar, white bread, etc) by themselves without any protein or fat source then you will get a rapid rise in blood glucose levels followed by a rapid fall in blood glucose levels (i.e. the "food coma"). If you add fat and protein into the meal (which most of us do) that blunts that response by slowing down the digestion process, thus slowing down the release of glucose into the blood stream. So this is where the feelings of lethargy associated with a high carbohydrate intake come from. Additionally, carbohydrate need is dictated by the intensity of an activity, to a certain extent. We are always using fats, carbohydrates, and protein for energy and are never just burning one. Now when we lift we need carbohydrates because there is some anaerobic glycolysis going on as we compile more and more sets of whole body exercise. Fats contribute little to nothing to this type of training so it's not a very good fuel source for a strength trainee. Therefore, the best macro split for a strength trainee is going to consist of high protein/low fat/high carbohydrate. Does this make sense?

    PS - Did Super Squats back in 08'. Fun times.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
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    Default

    Yes, this makes a lot of sense.

    I have been shooting for about 4000 calories a day. Usually that looks like 40% Carb, 35% Fat and 25% protein. If I continue to take in 4000 calories, but change the ratios to 50% Carb 20% Fat, and 30% Protein, would that reduce extra "fluff"? Or would I need to drop my calorie content?

    What would the ideal percentages be?


    PS - Did Super Squats back in 08'. Fun times.
    Even doing a high bar squat with a bar pad and going down to quarter depth was miserable.

  4. #4
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    How strong are you and what is your height and weight?

    Yes even squatting wrong for 20s can be awful. When I did it it was my first exposure to a "real gym" and the guys were all about low bar deep. They just didn't teach low bar well so i'm sure my back angle was too vertical despite proper depth. In short, they sucked ass wrong.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
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    Height: 6' 1"
    Pre LP Weight (Sept 2018): 170lb
    Current Weight: 210lb

    (These were not single rep PR attempts, just the max weight I have don in working sets)
    Squat: 315lb
    Deadlift: 360lb
    Bench Press: 187.5lb
    Press: 135lb

  6. #6
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    I wouldn't worry about reducing fluff and focus on getting that deadlift up to 405 x 5 so that the "fluff" is carried better (i.e. you look more muscular up top). Are you doing your pulldowns/chin ups?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
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    Default

    Will do. My coach has me doing Chins Ups, I am a BLOC member.

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Excellent, you are in good hands I'm sure you will be fine.

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