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Thread: Sleeping issues

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by CONRO View Post
    Hi, I've suffered of insomnia caused by stress (gym and life stress), anxiety and stuff... I have tried multiple solutions to that, and after many attempts I can say that for me the most powerful supplement for sleeping better is "Neuro Rest" by UTMOST ME, you can find it on amazon. In addition to the supplement the company gives a 4 week plan for increase sleep quality, you can find it on the site and it will be free unlocked when you'll get the code from buying it. I find it very helpful! Another thing I've bought is a bluetooth sleeping eye mask, it covers your face from lights and if you like it, you can listen to relaxing music when sleeping.
    I will try meditation and yoga, but not yet tried it, although I think it could help.
    Finally when I can't fall asleep at all, or in hard stress periods, I drink 2 (and not more) glass of red good wine before going to bed.
    I'm not a doctor, so take this for what it is worth, regarding Neuro Rest. There's evidence that longterm supplementation of 5-HTP and L trytophan alone can lead to depletion of dopamine and norepinephrine, unless it's supplemented concurrently with L-dopa and tyrosine (the amino acid precursors for dopamine and norepinephrine. And frankly, if someone is eating enough animal proteins and complex carbs (which, we should be already), they should be synthesizing plenty of serotonin anyway-- it's usually a problem on the receptor end rather than a supply issue.

    All that to say, I would be leery about taking 5-HTP for very long (and it's contraindicated for people taking SSRIs or MAOIs).

    Melatonin seems to be a good option, though. Back when I was in "The Place" (inpatient addiction treatment) melatonin and benadryl was the go-to combo for insomnia, and it seemed to work pretty well for a lot of people.

    Melatonin and benadryl are cheap, too, and don't adversely affect your other neurotransmitters.

  2. #22
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    i get about 5hrs a night, get up at 3:45 for an hours commute into work, and have a 2 hours commute most nights coming home. keep your priorities clear: family time comes first. I know that i have not made the same degree of gains that i could have had i put some evening limits on family time but why kind of a father/husband would i be? even with my sleep well below The Plan i am a hell of lot stronger now, and feel tons better, than i did before. that's a big win in my book (and why i recommend The Book to all my friends).

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Bingley View Post
    i get about 5hrs a night, get up at 3:45 for an hours commute into work, and have a 2 hours commute most nights coming home.
    It hurts just to read this. It's good that you're getting what you can out of training under such sapping conditions.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by stef View Post
    It hurts just to read this. It's good that you're getting what you can out of training under such sapping conditions.
    I can honestly say that every single physical aspect of my life is better since I started SS.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by stef View Post
    It hurts just to read this. It's good that you're getting what you can out of training under such sapping conditions.
    My father did some variant or another of this schedule for most of his 40+ year career. I did it, too, when I was 18 for my first job out of high school.

    As soul-sapping as it sounds, it's my opinion that everyone needs to do this at least once in their working life, preferably when you're young.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Satch12879 View Post
    As soul-sapping as it sounds, it's my opinion that everyone needs to do this at least once in their working life, preferably when you're young.
    120+ hr work weeks is all right, but commuting? No. Even then, no reason to do it just to do it and I can't recommend it as a debt-slave situation either.

  7. #27
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    Jul 2019
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    Quote Originally Posted by stef View Post
    120+ hr work weeks is all right, but commuting? No. Even then, no reason to do it just to do it and I can't recommend it as a debt-slave situation either.
    I 100% agree with this. Working 120 hours a week can be rewarding. There is, however no reward for spending 20% of your conscious life commuting.

  8. #28
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    Sep 2018
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    Been there. One of the reasons itís so hard to optimize sleep and the recovery during sleep is that we canít tell much about how weíre doing. I was given a ďfitnessĒ monitor thatís supposed to have the best sleep monitor short of going in and having sensors put on your skull and sleeping in a lab. It detects the stages of sleep, and is reputed to be decent at it.

    So, we hear we recover best during slow-wave sleep or ďdeepĒ sleep. Iíve increased the duration of my slow wave sleep by drinking a whole-milk casein-based protein drink before bed. I tried that on the theory that it is slower to digest than whey and might therefore be more available when I am hitting slow-wave sleep. Some magnesium of some kinds helps if taken occasionally. I stay away from melatonin (makes me dopey in the morning and I have enough of that as it is.)

    Thatís the good news. The bad news is Iím ending up with a shorter overall duration of sleep. Iím not sure how it effects my lifting and cognitive performance yet. Iím 62, so my trend will be toward less deep sleep, not to mention that recovery generally sucks.

    More bad news? Alcohol wrecks sleep. So drink early or not at all.

    I have no interest in this monitor. I never expected to bother with it for long. I pay little attention to some of the cardio benchmarks, except heart-rate variability and resting heart rate. I am keeping half an eye on the sleep and expect over time to diminish the decline of my deep sleep somewhat. The monitor is called a WHOOP strap. Anyone else?

    Given my improved sleep, it occurred to me . . . when barbell training in the 2020s is as popular as ďaerobicsĒ was in the 1980s and early 90s, I think it means that Rip will be the Jane Fonda of lifting. Yep. Jane.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yngvi View Post
    There is, however no reward for spending 20% of your conscious life commuting.
    been at it for 30+ years...hopefully only about 5-8 left to go lol

  10. #30
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    Jul 2019
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill G View Post
    More bad news? Alcohol wrecks sleep. So drink early or not at all.
    Do we actually know this? My personal experience is I feel more rested if I have had 1-3 drinks any time within 4 hours of going to bed.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Bingley View Post
    been at it for 30+ years...hopefully only about 5-8 left to go lol
    Damn, that is tough.

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