When the doctor says to lose weight... When the doctor says to lose weight...

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Thread: When the doctor says to lose weight...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
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    Eastland, Texas
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    Default When the doctor says to lose weight...

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    Hi--

    Thanks for giving us the opportunity to ask questions.

    I'm 44, 5'10", and weigh between 205-210 (mostly lean).

    I've been lifting consistently (but not necessarily intelligently) for ten years or so. For the first five years after starting back, I was also a long distance runner, so I made little progress in either (running or lifting). About five years ago, I cut out almost all cardio. I still run a little and take walks, but I've cut back enough to go from 170ish to my current weight.

    When I go to the doctor (usually only once a year for a flu shot), they give me the BMI lecture. Also, my blood pressure is too high (130ish/90). Regardless, I've continued to try to gain weight because I've spent my whole life being scrawny and am sick of it.

    Here are my questions: is it time to quit trying to gain weight? Should I start running again to control the blood pressure? And could creatine mono be a contributor to the high blood pressure due to water retention?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    I'd start the conditioning and hold the weight steady first. If that doesn't take it down then lose some body fat and see what happens.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Santana View Post
    I'd start the conditioning and hold the weight steady first. If that doesn't take it down then lose some body fat and see what happens.
    Sounds like a plan. Thank you!

  4. #4
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    You are welcome

  5. #5
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    Stan Efferding offers some advice on blood pressure which you may find helpful YouTube

  6. #6
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    Jun 2013
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    Don't want to minimize the BP issue and take this all w/ a grain of salt, but assuming they are doing the standard upper-arm measurement ask them to try a "long" cuff (aka: leg cuff) next time if they are not using one. A Dr. once told me the standard adult arm-cuff assumed an upper arm measurement in the range of 10" to 14" or so, IIRC. One measurement to another with the different cuffs actually made a difference (from a bit high down to normal) for me during one checkup.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveJF View Post
    Don't want to minimize the BP issue and take this all w/ a grain of salt, but assuming they are doing the standard upper-arm measurement ask them to try a "long" cuff (aka: leg cuff) next time if they are not using one. A Dr. once told me the standard adult arm-cuff assumed an upper arm measurement in the range of 10" to 14" or so, IIRC. One measurement to another with the different cuffs actually made a difference (from a bit high down to normal) for me during one checkup.
    There are so many factors that can influence BP. For one, BP has a diurnal variation so midmorning/early afternoon BP will always be the highest with the lowest taking place in the evening. Cuff size or measurement type (e.g. oscillometric cuff vs auscultation). Posture is the biggest one; if arm is bent, back is flexed, or legs are crossed you will get false values as well. Standing is lower than seated or supine blood pressures as well.

  8. #8
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    Feb 2019
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    This is why measures of BP in the doctors surgery/office are only to screen for high blood pressure. A diagnosis of hypertension requires either serial home measures or an ambulatory 24 hour measure.

  9. #9
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    Mar 2019
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    Coach,
    Does supplementing calcium reduce hypertension or does that work only through food sources, if at all, from your experience?

  10. #10
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    starting strength nutrition camp
    No calcium supplementation will not reduce hypertension but it can raise blood pressure if you supplement while on calcium channel blockers if taken in high enough doses.

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