Protein Absorption in Older Folks Protein Absorption in Older Folks

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Thread: Protein Absorption in Older Folks

  1. #1
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    Default Protein Absorption in Older Folks

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    I did a search in the forum and didn't see this addressed so I'm asking for any input here. I've seen it said over and over that older folks don't absorb or process protein as efficiently anymore.

    Which is it, absorb or process?

    If it's absorption, why then do people say you absorb all the protein you eat (in response to someone quoting the "only so much protein can be absorbed" myth) and don't sh*t it out?

    If it's process, what would the body do with extra protein it couldn't use towards muscle repair/building?

    Is there actual scientific study behind all this?

    I'm not looking for an amazingly long/deep explanation nor do I want to waste anyone's time with any arguments. I'd just really like to know if there really is science behind these claims, or even if it's something we know because of evidence in populations and if so can someone show it to me?

  2. #2
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    "Digest" is probably the better word. Older folks often have achlorohydria, where the stomach make less hydrochloric acid and thus they cannot effectively denature proteins as well as a young person. Therefore, they are unable to extract the amino acids, which leads to less protein absorption. I don't know any studies off hand but achlorohydria is heavily documented in the elderly and the downstream effects are pretty straightforward and well established at this point.

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    I googled achlorohydria and found some interesting results. You learn something new everyday. Quite satisfied with what I've found. Thanks for the response!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Santana View Post
    "Digest" is probably the better word. Older folks often have achlorohydria, where the stomach make less hydrochloric acid and thus they cannot effectively denature proteins as well as a young person. Therefore, they are unable to extract the amino acids, which leads to less protein absorption. I don't know any studies off hand but achlorohydria is heavily documented in the elderly and the downstream effects are pretty straightforward and well established at this point.
    Is there a way to supplement amino acids for us older people, or will any supplements be necessarily incomplete ? Also, does cider vinegar plus fresh lemon juice do any good, or is that more myth ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by David McClelland View Post
    I googled achlorohydria and found some interesting results. You learn something new everyday. Quite satisfied with what I've found. Thanks for the response!
    You are welcome. Glad that was helpful.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nockian View Post
    Is there a way to supplement amino acids for us older people, or will any supplements be necessarily incomplete ? Also, does cider vinegar plus fresh lemon juice do any good, or is that more myth ?
    I don't see how a supplement would be a bad thing. The amino acids would be free and available and protein denaturation in the stomach would not be necessary. There is a body of research out there supporting vinegar consumption improving insulin sensitivity. Apple cider vinegar was used in some of those papers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Santana View Post
    You are welcome. Glad that was helpful.



    I don't see how a supplement would be a bad thing. The amino acids would be free and available and protein denaturation in the stomach would not be necessary. There is a body of research out there supporting vinegar consumption improving insulin sensitivity. Apple cider vinegar was used in some of those papers.
    Interesting.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Santana View Post
    There is a body of research out there supporting vinegar consumption improving insulin sensitivity. Apple cider vinegar was used in some of those papers.
    Any papers supporting ice cream and fresh apple pie consumption improving insulin sensitivity? Had a glucose test come in at 107, will try the vinegar but prefer to exhaust other possibilities.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Slow Uncle Joe View Post
    Any papers supporting ice cream and fresh apple pie consumption improving insulin sensitivity? Had a glucose test come in at 107, will try the vinegar but prefer to exhaust other possibilities.
    No but you can write one and publish it on The Onion if you like.

  9. #9
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    I'm more curious if simply creating a more acidic stomach environment would assist with protein breakdown, whether it's apple cider vinegar, Coke, or whatever.

  10. #10
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    Vinegar can help increase acidity in a stomach that lacks it. It won't give you brownie points if you have a health gastrointestinal tract because stomach acid either has a similar or lower pH than vinegar.

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