Collagen peptides? Collagen peptides?

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Thread: Collagen peptides?

  1. #1
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    Default Collagen peptides?

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    Is there any real benefit from taking supplemental collagen peptides, especially for an older person? All of the information I have found seems to be published by companies selling it.

  2. #2
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    And how are the supplements different than a cup of Knox gelatin? Which does a remarkable job as a fining agent when brewing beer or when mixed thicker and warm is a good glue.

    Looking forward to some enlightenment on this.

  3. #3
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    There are a couple ways to rate protein quality, based on amino acid profile and absorption. The two scores are PDCAAS and DIAAS. Itís hard to get good info on this, as the google results are flooded with pages from supplement makers.

    Most of the ratings on protein sources, however, consistently rate collagen as an extremely low-quality protein source. Even if your focus is on building connective tissue (which is full of collagen ) rather than muscle, you are better off getting your protein from whole food sources, and using whey if you want or need to supplement.

    If you build muscle and strength, and get sufficient protein, your body will build all the collagen it needs.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suwannee Dave View Post
    Is there any real benefit from taking supplemental collagen peptides, especially for an older person? All of the information I have found seems to be published by companies selling it.
    The problem is that the average person does not consume much high quality protein. Then you prescribe collagen peptides and they see improvement in things like hair, skin, and nails. Now a lifter who consumes 150-250 g protein, mostly from high biological value sources? Doubt you will see anything there. Amino acids are amino acids so I don't see how collagen in it of itself is going to do anything different than consuming a high protein diet.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Santana View Post
    The problem is that the average person does not consume much high quality protein. Then you prescribe collagen peptides and they see improvement in things like hair, skin, and nails. Now a lifter who consumes 150-250 g protein, mostly from high biological value sources? Doubt you will see anything there. Amino acids are amino acids so I don't see how collagen in it of itself is going to do anything different than consuming a high protein diet.
    thanks, that's what I thought

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    Making stock for soups/stews is simple, cheap, tasty, and is more likely to cover any benefits.

    A whole chicken and a 2# bag of mixed veg turns into a whole bunch of useful, tasty food. I made some up just yesterday with added roasted poblanos and garlic, in fact. Boiled bones/skins/scrap also makes dogs happy. Nothing wasted, not even stray moths -- all incorporates nicely.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by stef View Post
    Making stock for soups/stews is simple, cheap, tasty, and is more likely to cover any benefits.

    A whole chicken and a 2# bag of mixed veg turns into a whole bunch of useful, tasty food. I made some up just yesterday with added roasted poblanos and garlic, in fact. Boiled bones/skins/scrap also makes dogs happy. Nothing wasted, not even stray moths -- all incorporates nicely.
    Came here to say this. Beef bone broth, and chicken or turkey stocks are a regular thing at our house. In fact the 9 y/o will heat up a mug of bone broth and drink it for a snack. It freezes well too.

  8. #8
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    starting strength coach development program
    Quote Originally Posted by stef View Post
    Making stock for soups/stews is simple, cheap, tasty, and is more likely to cover any benefits.

    A whole chicken and a 2# bag of mixed veg turns into a whole bunch of useful, tasty food. I made some up just yesterday with added roasted poblanos and garlic, in fact. Boiled bones/skins/scrap also makes dogs happy. Nothing wasted, not even stray moths -- all incorporates nicely.
    I like to butterfly a whole chicken before roasting it. I save the spines, and once I have a few it makes a great stock. Do you make the entire chicken into a soup?

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