My growing list of food allergies and carbs My growing list of food allergies and carbs - Page 2

starting strength gym
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18

Thread: My growing list of food allergies and carbs

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    3,486

    Default

    • wichita falls texas february 2021 seminar
    • starting strength seminar april 2021
    • starting strength seminar february 2021
    Sounds like a plan to me

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    165

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sib View Post
    Dont forget you need to wash rice, if you're eating loads of it especially.
    I did not know this, I never ate rice my entire lift until two years ago actually.
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt James View Post
    My mother has a very similar issue with grains. Wheat and corn are the worst for her, I believe.
    I should have known, but something along the lines of paleo diet might be in my future.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    3,486

    Default

    Some gluten free foods like oats are milled alongside foods that contain gluten and end up causing reactions in people with celiac. So you really have to make sure that is not the case with the brand you are buying. Would not recommend Quaker oats if you have this issue.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    165

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Santana View Post
    Some gluten free foods like oats are milled alongside foods that contain gluten and end up causing reactions in people with celiac. So you really have to make sure that is not the case with the brand you are buying. Would not recommend Quaker oats if you have this issue.
    Ah I never would have thought of that and did actually buy Quaker steel cut oats. Iím gonna research a brand that is truly gluten free and try to keep as strict as I can with that and grains for a bit. I appreciate your and everyone elseís input.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    3,486

    Default

    I'm sure there are various options today. The market for it is certainly there

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    2

    Default

    I agree with Robert here. In these situations, it is simply best to keep a food journal and document any symptoms experienced. I am an allergist and I see patients with this complaint often. Briefly, it is important not to conflate some terms so a couple definitions first to clarify:

    1) Food allergy denotes a very specific immune response, with a very specific group of clinical manifestations. Namely, a patient who is truly allergic to food will have one of 4 systems involved - skin, GI tract, respiratory tract, and vascular system. Often the clinical response involves a combination of these systems. The reaction is fairly quick, within minutes in most, and is typically dose-dependent but there are patient-specific augmenting factors (concomitant upper respiratory illness, seasonal allergy, activity, other meds).
    2) Food sensitivity is a term used often and can be confusing. Unfortunately, a great many different symptoms fall under this heading, and many people use this term to describe everything from belching to severe enteropathies (where your GI tract is chronically inflamed and does not absorb nutrients). Therefore its a blanket term, and does nothing to help convey a specific pattern of clinical reactions or denote a particular underlying pathophysiology.

    Clearly you are experiencing some non-specific adverse food reaction, and what you call it I guess does not matter as much as how you treat it. I am a "less is more" kind of doctor when it comes to interventions and medications, and I like the concept of "letting food by thy medicine". With that being said I also agree with Robert in stating you have an "acute inflammatory response", in that patients who have this after foods feel like they have the flu. The mechanism by which this occurs is ill-defined, and symptom severity varies greatly. Whatever we call this syndrome, its just not defined well in the medical literature, and when we don't have a definition we are shooting in the dark with treatment strategies. Wheat is often a culprit, and I see patients frequently who test negative for wheat allergy as well as negative for celiac, but who clearly have symptoms of the inflammatory response that you describe after wheat consumption.

    The food journal helps in the sense that it allows you document a pattern over time, whereby you recognize that consumption of a particular food or food group and then the subsequent clinical reaction are causally linked. Certainly seems like you have clearly documented this. However, as a side-note, and something to look into, is that many patients with hypothyroidism will have similar complaints due to undertreated thyroid disease, or the use of dessicated animal thyroid products - which vary greatly in bioavailability from batch to batch. I tell most patients to keep at it with the food journal, aggressively hydrate, avoid wheat, and try to eat clean (organic whole foods and preservative/refined sugar/dye-free). In your case, make sure your hypothyroidism is being treated by a boarded endocrine specialist.

    Assuming the thyroid issues are well-managed and monitored, and your dietary journal is accurate, you seem to be reacting to grains (wheat, and now rice), and I wont get into pedantic distinctions, but patients who have this have to avoid all grains. This means eating only whole foods as noted above- meats, vegetables, fruits, eggs, milk, but no wheat/oats/rice/corn - there are several others but just best to avoid all grains. A food journal will help, and hopefully you wont have to avoid all grains, and sounds like you are able to tolerate oats for now, hopefully for good.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Posts
    15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Johnsonville View Post
    Ah I never would have thought of that and did actually buy Quaker steel cut oats. Iím gonna research a brand that is truly gluten free and try to keep as strict as I can with that and grains for a bit. I appreciate your and everyone elseís input.

    I would suggest you try these which are produced in a gluten free plant:

    https://www.bobsredmill.com/gluten-f...-cut-oats.html

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    3,486

    Default

    starting strength coach development program
    Quote Originally Posted by Ebeshakir View Post
    I agree with Robert here. In these situations, it is simply best to keep a food journal and document any symptoms experienced. I am an allergist and I see patients with this complaint often. Briefly, it is important not to conflate some terms so a couple definitions first to clarify:

    1) Food allergy denotes a very specific immune response, with a very specific group of clinical manifestations. Namely, a patient who is truly allergic to food will have one of 4 systems involved - skin, GI tract, respiratory tract, and vascular system. Often the clinical response involves a combination of these systems. The reaction is fairly quick, within minutes in most, and is typically dose-dependent but there are patient-specific augmenting factors (concomitant upper respiratory illness, seasonal allergy, activity, other meds).
    2) Food sensitivity is a term used often and can be confusing. Unfortunately, a great many different symptoms fall under this heading, and many people use this term to describe everything from belching to severe enteropathies (where your GI tract is chronically inflamed and does not absorb nutrients). Therefore its a blanket term, and does nothing to help convey a specific pattern of clinical reactions or denote a particular underlying pathophysiology.

    Clearly you are experiencing some non-specific adverse food reaction, and what you call it I guess does not matter as much as how you treat it. I am a "less is more" kind of doctor when it comes to interventions and medications, and I like the concept of "letting food by thy medicine". With that being said I also agree with Robert in stating you have an "acute inflammatory response", in that patients who have this after foods feel like they have the flu. The mechanism by which this occurs is ill-defined, and symptom severity varies greatly. Whatever we call this syndrome, its just not defined well in the medical literature, and when we don't have a definition we are shooting in the dark with treatment strategies. Wheat is often a culprit, and I see patients frequently who test negative for wheat allergy as well as negative for celiac, but who clearly have symptoms of the inflammatory response that you describe after wheat consumption.

    The food journal helps in the sense that it allows you document a pattern over time, whereby you recognize that consumption of a particular food or food group and then the subsequent clinical reaction are causally linked. Certainly seems like you have clearly documented this. However, as a side-note, and something to look into, is that many patients with hypothyroidism will have similar complaints due to undertreated thyroid disease, or the use of dessicated animal thyroid products - which vary greatly in bioavailability from batch to batch. I tell most patients to keep at it with the food journal, aggressively hydrate, avoid wheat, and try to eat clean (organic whole foods and preservative/refined sugar/dye-free). In your case, make sure your hypothyroidism is being treated by a boarded endocrine specialist.

    Assuming the thyroid issues are well-managed and monitored, and your dietary journal is accurate, you seem to be reacting to grains (wheat, and now rice), and I wont get into pedantic distinctions, but patients who have this have to avoid all grains. This means eating only whole foods as noted above- meats, vegetables, fruits, eggs, milk, but no wheat/oats/rice/corn - there are several others but just best to avoid all grains. A food journal will help, and hopefully you wont have to avoid all grains, and sounds like you are able to tolerate oats for now, hopefully for good.
    I have to say that this is one of the best explanations I've seen in a while. Lots of mumbo jumbo out there when it comes to allergies, intolerances, sensitivities and whatever other term they want to use for the latest anti-carb article

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •