Two separate questions... Two separate questions...

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Thread: Two separate questions...

  1. #1
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    Default Two separate questions...

    • starting strength seminar august 2021
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    (may be a double post, sorry)
    Robert, two separate things to ask...

    1) Peter Attia just had Layne Norton on his podcast. Spent ~2 hours talking about sports/strength/nutrition. If you listened, do you have an opinion on the content? If you didn't listen, do you have any opinions on the two of them? Just curious.

    2) family member is 53yo menopausal female, very overweight. I have told her to eat ~150g protein and ~150g carb, with ~30g of fat, for about 1600cal/day. She's severely detained, so lifts will progress, but need to be cautious (going to Pete very soon). She's not lost much lbs in first week of this diet. It will take a couple of weeks for her to start dropping some lbs, right? (may have her call you soon for a consult, and I'll pay for it). It is a big deal that she's at the gym ready to lift. A big deal.

  2. #2
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    1) Haven't listened. I like Layne he has historically promoted sound content. However, I am not a fan of the "debunking" business model. We all have to do it to some extent but I lose interest when that is the center of the business. Still like him nonetheless. Is there something specific that stuck out that you want to know about? Shoot me a link

    2) Chances are she is eating more than that on some days especially if getting her to the gym was a milestone. Dieting 7 days in a row is hard for a lot of people. That said, many women in that age group are resistant to fat loss for one reason or another and have to restrict pretty low to get the needle moving. Happy to chat with her though.

  3. #3
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    Let me know if this doesn't work...no specific questions.

    [The Peter Attia Drive] #163 - Layne Norton, Ph.D.: Building muscle, losing fat, and the importance of resistance training #thePeterAttiaDrive
    #163 - Layne Norton, Ph.D.: Building muscle, losing fat, and the importance of resistance training - Podcast Addict via @PodcastAddict

    2) you said many women are resistant to fat loss. Do you mean their body behaves differently (due to menopause & hormones) or that the individual doesn't follow the rules? She's 5'1", and getting to 170 would be huge for her. Are the macros I posted close to on target?

  4. #4
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    1) I'll give it a listen

    2) A combination of factors. Less muscle mass, hormones, menopause and the fact that many women have dieted and weight cycled many times over a lifetime by the time they hire me. So now you are dealing with what appears to be metabolic adaptation too.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Santana View Post
    1) I'll give it a listen

    2) A combination of factors. Less muscle mass, hormones, menopause and the fact that many women have dieted and weight cycled many times over a lifetime by the time they hire me. So now you are dealing with what appears to be metabolic adaptation too.
    So, it's clear that I am out of my league here (further convincing me to get her a consult with you), bc the little bit of googling metabolic adaptation is confusing me (and I don't trust the results in the search).

    So my last f/u question... Is it a safe assumption that consistent strength training (aka NLP) can help reverse this? Keep lifting, sticking to the macros above (~160g protein and carbs, total cal of about 1600)?

  6. #6
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    starting strength coach development program
    It means that if you stay at a calorie level long enough your body will adapt by down-regulating metabolic rate to accommodate it. This is in part due to muscle loss of course. So yes gaining muscle through lifting helps mitigate the effects but I am unsure if it eliminates or reverses it entirely.

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