Weight loss after menopause Weight loss after menopause

starting strength gym
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Weight loss after menopause

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    49

    Default Weight loss after menopause

    • starting strength seminar december 2023
    • starting strength seminar february 2024
    • starting strength seminar april 2024
    Hi Robert,

    My better half is 48, easing into menopause. She doesn't train. She is fairly fit, but it's carrying a few extra pounds, in her belly and arms.

    I've told her spot reduction of weight from a specific area doesn't work, and she seems generally accepting of that.

    However, when I tell her it just boils down to calories and macros, she responds with "post menopause women are different, more cortisol, belly fat, etc" a seemingly bulletproof argument.

    What does an expert say to this? Are post menopause women really that different? Or would it boil down to the same weight loss advice for anyone: track calories, weigh daily, see what weekly average weight is doing, and make calorie intake changes accordingly?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    4,545

    Default

    There is truth to what she is saying. Changes to fat storage patterns are a known phenomenon with menopausal women. Estrogen typically sends fat to the ass, thighs, and hips. Less estrogen = more of a typical male fat storage pattern (I.e. in the mid section). Best thing she can do is train because a post menopausal women who trains will look better than one who doesn't.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    49

    Default

    Hey thanks Coach, that makes sense.

    Encouraging her to train might be a challenge. Does anyone have pointers or an article on how to pull that off?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Posts
    360

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Santana View Post
    There is truth to what she is saying. Changes to fat storage patterns are a known phenomenon with menopausal women. Estrogen typically sends fat to the ass, thighs, and hips. Less estrogen = more of a typical male fat storage pattern (I.e. in the mid section). Best thing she can do is train because a post menopausal women who trains will look better than one who doesn't.
    Would it not also be a good idea to talk to a hormone therapy doc?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    4,545

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mike_g View Post
    Hey thanks Coach, that makes sense.

    Encouraging her to train might be a challenge. Does anyone have pointers or an article on how to pull that off?
    Keep the stakes low and offer. You can lead a horse to water...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Posts
    90

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mike_g View Post

    Encouraging her to train might be a challenge. Does anyone have pointers or an article on how to pull that off?
    Id leave it be, if I were you. You train, she sees that, but she isnt ready to start training herself. Its not for everyone. Most people wont train. Not everyone values a muscular body.

    Peri-menopause & menopause & aging can be rough, really rough, for some women. Is it possible she might interpret your encouragement to train as criticism or displeasure about her changing body?

    I agree with the suggestion for a hormone doc, when shes ready.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Posts
    360

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HailMary View Post
    Id leave it be, if I were you. You train, she sees that, but she isnt ready to start training herself. Its not for everyone. Most people wont train. Not everyone values a muscular body.

    Peri-menopause & menopause & aging can be rough, really rough, for some women. Is it possible she might interpret your encouragement to train as criticism or displeasure about her changing body?

    I agree with the suggestion for a hormone doc, when shes ready.
    This is a thing for my wife as well. She eats well, if not enough. But shes 50, her doc has told her she has high cholesterol, she has frozen shoulder ( which is badly affecting her ability to train, and is also tied to menopause), and I was surprised at the pushback she got when she inquired about hormone therapy. I didnt think that it had the stigma for women that it does for men, given that it mostly doesnt involve the T word.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Posts
    90

    Default

    starting strength coach development program
    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Kalin View Post
    and I was surprised at the pushback she got when she inquired about hormone therapy. I didn’t think that it had the stigma for women that it does for men, given that it mostly doesn’t involve the “T” word.
    Oh, the media and the doctors scared the crap out of women over the WHI. Lots of problems with that study.

    The Controversial History of Hormone Replacement Therapy - PMC

    From the link above....."After the announcement of the first results of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) in 2002, which showed that HRT had more detrimental than beneficial effects, HRT use dropped. The negative results of the study received wide publicity, creating panic among some users and new guidance for doctors prescribing HRT."

    Interestingly, there are direct-to-consumer (women) bioidentical hormone replacement companies popping up online, such as Evernow, Midi, Thrive. There must be demand. Maybe this is indicative of widespread pushback and lack of enthusiasm for BHRT in the regular doctor's office. Why must people suffer, needlessly, over physiological dosing? I don't get it.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •