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Thread: Increased atherosclerosis risk from protein intake?

  1. #1
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    Question Increased atherosclerosis risk from protein intake?

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    Today, someone sent me this article, which mentions research that indicates increased protein intake results in a higher risk for atherosclerosis.

    I'd like to read the original article rather than derivative texts (even though most of it would go over my head) but unfortunately, the original paper is hidden behind a paywall, and Sci-Hub doesn't appear to have the article at the moment.

    It's probably just more vegan propaganda trying to get people to consume less meat, but I'd like to hear your take on it.

  2. #2
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    I can't get a hold of the pdf but will ask around to see if someone else can. In general, this is an acute study that, like most nutrition studies, does not control for lifestyle or habitual dietary intake. They are assuming that because they observed some negative cardiovascular change, at the molecular level, in rats, that they may see the same thing in humans. First, we are not rats and scaling what is fed to a rat to a human is not as marginal of a detail as they try to make it sound. Second, training status is not controlled for so my assumption is that they are studying untrained individuals that have no stimuli to justify a higher protein intake. Last, but certainly not least, they had them drink Boost plus, which is hardly high in protein (14 g) but is highish in fat (14 g). So you have a 1:1 protein:fat ratio with a relatively high carb intake. Lifters generally don't drink Boost plus and most protein supplements marketed to lifters are much higher in protein and lower in fat and carbohydrate unless it's a weight gainer. They mislead the readers by stating that they "controlled for carbohydrate intake" without any mention of fat, which "the literature" goes back decades stating that low quality fats can lead to heart disease if consumed at high amounts over time. Also junk data btw but at least it's plausible (atherosclerotic plaques are made up of fat).

    Anyhow, they can claim this bullshit all they want but it doesn't make it any less bullshit. Another example of what Stef and I discussed on the podcast. Garbage in garbage out.
    Last edited by Robert Santana; 05-22-2024 at 08:43 AM. Reason: typo

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    As expected... Thanks for the reply, Robert. Much appreciated!

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    Boost Plus

    Ingredients
    WATER, GLUCOSE SYRUP, SUGAR, VEGETABLE OIL (CANOLA, HIGH OLEIC SUNFLOWER, CORN), MILK PROTEIN CONCENTRATE, AND LESS THAN 2% OF SOY PROTEIN ISOLATE, CALCIUM CASEINATE, SODIUM CASEINATE, VITAMINS AND MINERALS‡, GUM ACACIA, FRUCTOOLIGOSACCHARIDES, INULIN (FROM CHICORY), SOY LECITHIN, SALT, NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL FLAVOR, CARRAGEENAN

    ‡VITAMINS AND MINERALS: POTASSIUM CITRATE, CALCIUM PHOSPHATE, MAGNESIUM PHOSPHATE, MAGNESIUM CHLORIDE, SODIUM ASCORBATE, CHOLINE BITARTRATE, FERROUS SULFATE, POTASSIUM CHLORIDE, DL-ALPHA TOCOPHERYL ACETATE, ZINC SULFATE, NIACINAMIDE, CALCIUM PANTOTHENATE, MANGANESE SULFATE, PYRIDOXINE HYDROCHLORIDE, RIBOFLAVIN, THIAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE, VITAMIN A PALMITATE, COPPER SULFATE, FOLIC ACID, POTASSIUM IODIDE, VITAMIN K1, CHROMIUM CHLORIDE, SODIUM SELENITE, BIOTIN, SODIUM MOLYBDATE, VITAMIN D3, VITAMIN B12
    I'm not sure if milk protein concentrate has any milk fats, but the order of ingredients still indicates that most of that fat is from those seed oils. Couldn't possibly be anything wrong with that, right?

  5. #5
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    From the bottle: https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/...fL._SX679_.jpg

    Yummy, yummy! Hard to take any of this seriously when something like this is involved. Note how this revolting industrial dogshit differs oh so very slightly from the image at the top of the media piece.

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    Quote Originally Posted by stef View Post
    From the bottle: https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/...fL._SX679_.jpg

    Yummy, yummy! Hard to take any of this seriously when something like this is involved. Note how this revolting industrial dogshit differs oh so very slightly from the image at the top of the media piece.
    Oh god, that's what they fed people in the study? Hilarious!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by stef View Post
    From the bottle: https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/...fL._SX679_.jpg

    Yummy, yummy! Hard to take any of this seriously when something like this is involved. Note how this revolting industrial dogshit differs oh so very slightly from the image at the top of the media piece.
    Yes. Good luck getting these propagandists to put a cauldron of shit as their main photo. IT MUST BE THE LEUCINE!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Bex View Post
    Oh god, that's what they fed people in the study? Hilarious!
    Nope. It's what they fed mice. They didn't even study actual people...

    Of course, that product has been marketed to humans for some time, for their "health". Apparently, there's significant demand for it: Boost (drink) - Wikipedia

    Then again, there's significant demand for Crocs, socialism, and Taylor Swift's music, too, so I guess there's no accounting for taste.

  9. #9
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    The contribution of this to atherosclerosis is also pretty tenuous. They claim it activated inflammatory markers, the science of which is much less definite than scicom likes to claim.

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