Recovery and training schedule Recovery and training schedule

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Thread: Recovery and training schedule

  1. #1
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    Default Recovery and training schedule

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    The training schedule of mon, wed, fri is set up this way to allow for recovery and adaptation before the next work out. Assuming it were possible to increase recovery time significantly. What would be best to add on Tuesday and Thursday or if those should still be off days what would be added to the mon, wed, fri schedule? Cheers and thanks

  2. #2
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    Why would you assume this?

  3. #3
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    5 days in a row sounds like a good way to get burned out real quick.

  4. #4
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    Just do the program.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    Why would you assume this?
    b/c assuming the recovery time was much better either genetically or chemically enhanced then more work should further drive the desired adaptation. The reason (at least from my basic/beginner understanding of the program) for training with a limited number of movements on the 3 day a week schedule is based on the recoverability of the lifter to the point where there is a balance between stress and recovery that drives the adaptation. Perhaps this is more theoretical than practical although probably it's possible to speed up recovery time I'm wondering what the program might look like where a person is in fact able to recover that much faster? Would this include more movements on training days or just more training days? Cheers and thanks for your help.

  6. #6
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    In Practical Programming 3rd Ed, Rip writes that recovery is “trainable”.
    My interpretation is that recovery practices can be improved but there is of course a ceiling, an upper limit.
    The whole program is based on the ability to recover from the the training stress, so why would you want to add more stress to a fairly static ability to recover? If the question is theoretical, then it likely depends on your level of training. As a novice, you may not be able to drive enough stress.
    As an intermediate, then of course you can train to exceed recovery.

    My two cents is that if you understand that the whole program in SS (novice LP, intermediate as defined in PP) is based on the ability to recover and adapt, you will be less likely to be tempted to shortchange recovery.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by TommyGun View Post
    In Practical Programming 3rd Ed, Rip writes that recovery is “trainable”.
    My interpretation is that recovery practices can be improved but there is of course a ceiling, an upper limit.
    The whole program is based on the ability to recover from the the training stress, so why would you want to add more stress to a fairly static ability to recover? If the question is theoretical, then it likely depends on your level of training. As a novice, you may not be able to drive enough stress.
    As an intermediate, then of course you can train to exceed recovery.

    My two cents is that if you understand that the whole program in SS (novice LP, intermediate as defined in PP) is based on the ability to recover and adapt, you will be less likely to be tempted to shortchange recovery.
    This doesn't answer the question bc the question assumes someone can increase recovery time not shirt change it. Some chemical factors that can increase recovery time are addressed in chapter 4 if practical programming. Perhaps more in depth later but I'm still reading...

  8. #8
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    If you want to see how much training you can stand vs how much training you need to make the best gains, go ahead. Keep notes. They will be valuable later.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    If you want to see how much training you can stand vs how much training you need to make the best gains, go ahead. Keep notes. They will be valuable later.
    so what you are saying is that even given an increased ability to recover there is no additional benefit from either more movements or more days of training? Isn't it just that the drives adaptation; the ability to recover from the stress?

  10. #10
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    starting strength coach development program
    Who has this theoretical increased ability to recover?

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