Programming around a huge change in work load Programming around a huge change in work load

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Thread: Programming around a huge change in work load

  1. #1
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    Default Programming around a huge change in work load

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    (Originally posted in General Programming because I didn't think it was an age-related topic)

    Background:
    I"m a 66 year old lifter, training consistently for the past 6 years. My current 3x work sets are: SQ 285, BP245, DL385, PR170. Besides lifting, I spend most of the week behind a desk or engaging in moderate activity like walking my dog. The moderate activity part will soon change.
    Details:
    I"m starting a 6-week project to build a 20x25' timber frame pavilion, an extended version of this: 20x20 King Post with Shed Roof Plan - Timber Frame HQ. This will involve moving 70 pieces of wet, fresh sawed cypress timbers ranging from 150 to 400lbs, sometimes like this YouTube, then sawing the ends with a chainsaw, fine-cutting mortises and tenons, assembling and standing up 1,500lb "bents" (that's timber framer talk for wall sections) and pegging them together to form the building (ref. movie "Witness"). This translates to say 5 hours on my feet, lifting, moving, dragging, etc. on Saturdays and Sundays, plus a couple of 2 hour night sessions during the week. To summarize, a huge increase in physical workload and fatigue.
    Question:
    I expect to dial back lifting to accommodate. Thinking 20% and doing 3x5's so I can maintain (?) strength and form, 2 lifts per night 3 days/week. I expect to need more food but still lose weight (now 242).
    Would love to hear your thoughts about programming under these circumstances.

  2. #2
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    I think if you work on the pavilion on the weekend and 2 nights a week, and continue to train 3 days, it is only a matter of time before you get squashed, either by a barbell or a timber. I would suggest a 50% cutback, and maybe doing sets of 3 a couple of days per week; squat/press, and bench/deadlift.

  3. #3
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    I would like to add to my previous post. This is a priority question. Is it more important to maintain your training regimen, or get the pavilion built. At your age (no offense, I'm 70), I think the priority should be getting the pavilion built, even if you have to give up training for the duration. I will quote (maybe paraphrase) Rip, when criticized for having a belly instead of abzz: I don't care!

  4. #4
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    Thanks for your thoughts, Dave. My priority is building the pavilion. Getting strong enables me to do it, and what good is strength without application? I'll dial it back slowly. Last night I lifted at about 80%, so press 3x5x135 and deadlift 2x5x315. I worked making templates for cutting timbers this evening, so a lot of time on my feet but no extra loading. Took delivery of some pallet forks, which attach to my tractor bucket so I can off load the timbers when they arrive. Bought a 15" bent chisel on eBay to clean out the 2󭅉" mortises I'll be cutting.
    Right now I'm hoping to keep my work set weight a constant, and make the first thing to "give" be frequency. This is uncharted territory, as is the project.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bestafter60 View Post
    ... Took delivery of some pallet forks, which attach to my tractor bucket so I can off load the timbers when they arrive...
    Well, I'm glad that you have a piece of equipment. I was afraid you were going to do everything manually. Don't forget that with rope and block and tackle equipment you can use the tractor to raise heavy loads as well.

  6. #6
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    Good luck! I have nothing of substance to add, but it sounds like a very cool project.

    Watch out for your over training symptoms, eat red meat like it's your job, and nap every chance you get.

  7. #7
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    Good advice, Cheesepuff, especially about the naps! I've dropped to 2x per week @80% of my old work sets, with no increases in weight planned. So last night 3x5x235 squats and 3x5x195 bench. I'm starting to see an LP in "Being on my feet". I'll be wearing compression stockings to help with that.

  8. #8
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    Would a coach kindly weigh in on this?

    I'm a 66 year old experienced lifter who works a largely desk job. My work sets including 270 lb squats, 385 lb deadlifts, 170 lb press and 250 lb bench. I have taken on a 2-3 month voluntary project which will require heavy lifting and long hours on my feet on weekends and weekday evenings. What programming changes do you advise for the duration of the project to minimize strength loss and maintain energy level sufficient for day job, training and working the project?

    I've already made adjustments on my own since the original posting, but would still like to hear a coach's ideas.

  9. #9
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    Deeper into the project, here's what I've learned relative to training:
    There is an LP in one's ability to be on their feet, at least for old guys. I'm now totally comfortable with 10+ hours a day, on consecutive days, and those days' work includes moving big timbers, tractoring, heavy mallet & chisel work, etc. with the temp typically between 85-100 degrees. The weekend work requires 2 days' recovery. I've cut back 20% on work set weights and I'm able to continue lifting, mostly 2x per week, occasionally only 1x. SQ 245, BP 205 DL 315 OP 135. Weight has remained constant at 240. I'd say over the past 5 years lifting I have built up a very good work capacity. Old guys rule!
    Here's a progress picture, one of the "bents" in a trial fitting. This represents about 20% of the project:
    IMG_3139.jpg

  10. #10
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    Looks great! Fun project!

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