How to treat (seated) press in low ceiling quarantine gym How to treat (seated) press in low ceiling quarantine gym

starting strength gym
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: How to treat (seated) press in low ceiling quarantine gym

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Calgary
    Posts
    2

    Default How to treat (seated) press in low ceiling quarantine gym

    • wichita falls texas december seminar 2020
    • wichita falls texas february 2021 seminar
    • starting strength seminar april 2021
    Howdy all,

    I was lucky enough to get to take home a barbell, lots of weights and a bench from my community centre gym, and got the last rack from a local manufacturer that should come today or tomorrow.

    Unfortunately the only place for me to set up the gym is in my low ceiling basement. That means no standing press. I understand that the seated press is not a replacement, but for now it's the best I got unless someone can suggest a low-clearance alternative.

    Do I treat it as an accessory exercise and move it to accessory day (dips, chin ups, standing curls) and up my bench press training frequency, or do I use it as a replacement for the standing press in my regular AB schedule and keep the same bench press frequency?

    - Yannai
    41yr male, 230lb, 6'1"
    Squat 340 worksets
    BP 252 worksets
    P 165 worksets
    DL 390 workset

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Powerlifting legend Hugh Cassidy apparently had this issue in his home basement gym. According to Marty Gallagher, they did seated presses. Their programming was different, prioritizing the Bench, Squat, Deadlift twice weekly, and whatever gas was left was then spent on other lifts. I wouldn’t put too much thought into this, adapt to your circumstances and get at it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    3,337

    Default

    Seated presses work real good and teach you how to stabilize your back on the press. You will find yourself much tighter and under control when you go back to standing.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Posts
    23

    Default

    I had this problem. However, once I decided to take the bar up out of the basement, press, and bring it back down after the problem was no longer there. It seems like a huge pain in the butt whilst you do it, but in the grand scheme of things doesn't take too long at all. Especially if you can spare some weights to stow seperate. It's not ideal, and I have since bought a second cheap 4ft bar specifically for pressing, but well doable.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    282

    Default

    Every time this issue comes up I think of this thread- Overhead Pressing and Low Ceilings

    Dude actually dug a pit in his basement floor to make enough clearance for pressing. Pretty ingenious.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    3,337

    Default

    If you train it you can get to a pretty high percentage of your press. I'd say it's a suitable exercise for shoulder strength, meaning that you can still build appreciable amounts of muscle mass with it, but of course it's not a perfect replacement. I've subbed it for lifters who have an extraneous layback to the point where they had pain and it worked out just fine. Layback cleaned up as well

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Posts
    591

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Santana View Post
    Seated presses work real good and teach you how to stabilize your back on the press. You will find yourself much tighter and under control when you go back to standing.
    I have actually noticed this myself training it for a few weeks. I started off kinda wobbly but now I'm steady. Also think I corrected a shoulder positioning error I was making. Can't wait til gyms open back up to go back to doing heavy standing presses and see if I can apply it to the big boy version of the lift.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    3,337

    Default

    starting strength coach development program
    The added stability will probably result in PRs when you stand again. It may also help set your back tighter on the squat too if you've been neglecting that. Seated presses, push presses, and front squats are my go-tos for intermediates that struggle with thoracic extension.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •