An exception to the no-partial-squats rule? An exception to the no-partial-squats rule? - Page 2

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Thread: An exception to the no-partial-squats rule?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
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    23

    Default The are not partials if the range of motion is partially duplicative.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Z View Post
    I would think pause squats would be better to drive progress because you're going to be able to lift heavier with the pause squat than you would with this 1.5 thingy. Seems like it would not be optimal to me
    Pause squats are the alternative. Iím looking for a light day substitute and am concluding that actually moving through that lower part of range of motion with these things to improve that part of the range because of some peculiarities of my problems is worth a try. My deadlift is relatively heavier than my squat, and actually moving through the range of motion I want to stabilize seems better than a hold for now. Iím optimistic that pause squats will be more useful still after I dial in the low end of the movement pattern over the next several weeks.

    Iíll try to report back. Though it is not written . . . .

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
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    79

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    Have you done a complete progression of pause squats yet? i.e. started with a comfortable weight and then gotten to the point where form breaks down or you start failing reps for multiple work outs? You're not going to see the benefit of pause squats until they're heavy enough. It's an assistance exercise but it needs to be progressed just like any other movement before you see an adaptation.

  3. #13
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    Sep 2018
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    23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Z View Post
    Have you done a complete progression of pause squats yet? i.e. started with a comfortable weight and then gotten to the point where form breaks down or you start failing reps for multiple work outs? You're not going to see the benefit of pause squats until they're heavy enough. It's an assistance exercise but it needs to be progressed just like any other movement before you see an adaptation.
    Thatís sound advice, Steve, and youíre correct in sensing that Iím impatient and could gain from a full progression of pause squats. Iím giving my impatience sway partly based on Dr. Sullyís recent experience in finding that his squatting rehab benefitted greatly when he made a concerted effort to move through squat-like movement patterns on off days, and partly based on Ripís 10-year old video explaining that a leg press is a really handy machine to start the elderly who canít hit depth squatting. You canít get stronger in a range of motion you canít move through, Rip points out, and Iím testing a corollary of that observation about old lifters: you wonít get as strong in a range of motion you donít move though weíll and freely. The pegs are wooden and a little unstable. I asked about the movement pattern primarily to elicit any thinking that itís dangerous or counter productive while recognizing it might not be as good as a proper run of pause squats when all is said and done.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    655

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill G View Post
    A SSC wouldíve solved my squat issues long ago, I suspect, but here I am.
    You answered your question here. Go see a coach, or at the very least post videos of your squats on the technique board for feedback.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
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    1,795

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    I don't think playing around with some weird different squat pattern is going to be beneficial for you. You're 65, you should be focusing on getting the squat right if there's something wrong with it. Form checks are useful. Coaching is even more useful. Whether you are willing/able to make the investment is your call. But your body is probably a lot more resistant to acquiring new movement patterns at your age, and introducing something to confuse it when you haven't even gotten mastery of the basic squat is going to do more harm than good. I also don't think doing these sorts of "bouncy squats" is such a great idea for a guy who admittedly has arthritic knees. Sleeves or maybe even wraps are, however, a good idea. If you are dead set on a substitute exercise for a light squat day, consider a box squat. Again, that should help with the knee issues. But I'd focus on getting the actual squat right if you aren't there yet. There's a lot of things that can go wrong with the movement, and it's the one you can mentally monitor the least while you are doing it. I've been doing this on and off for more than 2 years now and my form still creeps away from passable as time goes on and the weight goes up.

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