How to stop losing back angle when squatting? How to stop losing back angle when squatting?

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Thread: How to stop losing back angle when squatting?

  1. #1
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    Default How to stop losing back angle when squatting?

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    When coming out from the hole in a squat, I find when I am trying to drive my hips up my back becomes more horizontal. I've deloaded and can reduce this happening to a decent degree, but I find the hardest part of the exercise is often just keeping my chest up. Do you have any tips or cue that may help me from turning my squat into a good morning mimic?

    Only squatting 155lbs at the moment.

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    Does your knees go back after you com out of the hole?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Subsistence View Post
    When coming out from the hole in a squat, I find when I am trying to drive my hips up my back becomes more horizontal. I've deloaded and can reduce this happening to a decent degree, but I find the hardest part of the exercise is often just keeping my chest up. Do you have any tips or cue that may help me from turning my squat into a good morning mimic?

    Only squatting 155lbs at the moment.
    Have you taken a video of yourself? Driving your ass backwards often causes this.

  4. #4
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    If you are a beginner one problem could be that your back is not strong enough yet, but if you are doing deads also that should pass after some months. I now and then notice this myself and I guess it happens to many when doing more than 3-4 reps as a lighter weight might be tempting for a goodmorning on the final reps. If and when it happens I just try to refocus on the next rep.

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    Assuming 155 is your work set weight you have to keep in mind that work sets are usually heavy and heavy can mean compromised form. One tip is to not rush it and make sure to concentrate on keeping the back where you want it. Really concentrate on it. Don't go through your set then tell yourself "I didn't like my back angle." Remind yourself all througout your rep and set with "Chest up" , "Back straight", or whatever cue helps you the most. I am positive you can do it, you just need the right way to think about doing it.

    I have the same issue with parts of my squat as well. I just make sure to tell myself to do it correctly the whole time and that really seems to help.

    But then again by rep 5 the most important thing is to simply stand back up. If your form issue is happening on all your reps that is one thing, but if you have to do a partial goodmorning to get the last rep of your last set back up then, well, welcome to Starting Strength where working very hard is normal.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Subsistence View Post
    When coming out from the hole in a squat, I find when I am trying to drive my hips up my back becomes more horizontal.
    "My back becomes more horizontal" doesn't really tell us anything. It could be that you're trying to keep your back too upright to begin with, and as you come out of the hole your back assumes the necessary position to keep the bar balanced. The important factor is not what your back angle is, but whether the bar is remaining centered over the mid-foot throughout the movement.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LudwigVan View Post
    "My back becomes more horizontal" doesn't really tell us anything. It could be that you're trying to keep your back too upright to begin with, and as you come out of the hole your back assumes the necessary position to keep the bar balanced. The important factor is not what your back angle is, but whether the bar is remaining centered over the mid-foot throughout the movement.
    I think what the OP means is that he is lifting his ass faster than his chest, doing a good-morningesque movement. My training partner is having the same problem, actually.

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    I know what losing back angle means.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LudwigVan View Post
    I know what losing back angle means.
    Ok, sorry if I sounded condescending.

  10. #10
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    Sorry for being so late getting back on this. I've kept trying, but I don't have a video. I also feel like I *might* be hyperextending my back (no idea if this is relevant, but thought I'd mention it).

    It is mainly just the moment coming out of the hole, I try to drive up really hard my my ass gets driven up but due to some weakness in the connection between my ass and the bar, the bar moves up at a slower rate. I guess I'll just get stronger (my deadlift is pathetic right now) and work really hard on maintaining proper form for as many reps on as many sets of possible, and accept a little bit of a loss of back angle or whatever happens when you're trying to go for a new PR, like you do every week on SS.

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