Squat form check with narrow stance Squat form check with narrow stance

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Thread: Squat form check with narrow stance

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
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    2

    Default Squat form check with narrow stance

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    Age: 28
    Height: 5' 5
    Weight: 174lbs, give or take

    Hi all,

    About a month ago I started weightlifting for the first time ever. Since the beginning I noticed that I found it physically impossible to break parallel with a shoulder-width stance, and whenever I tried to push it I felt a sharp pain on my hips. I got an X-ray and was diagnosed with pincer-type FAI by two different doctors. Here's a picture of the X-ray. I also got an MRI to see if there's any damage to the labrum; will post the results when I get them if needed.

    I've looked through these forums and saw that a lot of other folks had the same condition, and tried to remedy it by switching their stance. I found that the only way in which I can reach some depth and not feel much pain is with an extremely narrow stance, with my heels almost touching each other and my feet pointing out. This stance requires me to shoot my knees all the way forward to make room for my torso when I'm descending, and having my heels up on plates/a piece of wood to be able to go deeper. My squat therefore looks like this (sorry for the shaky camera):

    Here I'm using a slightly wider stance that what I'm most confortable with.

    This is from today.

    The issues here are AFAIK:

    1. Knees forward all the way. This takes work off my hamstrings, and defeats the purpose of low bar squatting. It may also destroy my knees, I guess?
    2. Having my heels raised, which the book recommends against.
    3. Stance too narrow, which causes 1 and 2.
    4. Butt wink, particularly in the first video.
    5. Not reaching full depth, even with all this. I'm not sure of how could I physically reach more depth while using this stance, though.

    My question is how to fix these issues, if at all possible. If not, should I switch to high bar? Is my (bastardized) squat a high bar in disguise, with just a little more moment arm between the hip and the bar?

    Thanks for your time.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    690

    Default

    Hey Martin

    I know a few people that have to squat narrow because of issues in the hip. But they mitigate this by turning the toes outward more.
    You really need to get a hold of some lifting shoes if you can.
    In both videos you're not leaning over enough and trying to stay too upright.
    The lumbar wiggle that you're seeing as you hit the bottom is because you're over-extending the lumbar spine to start (while trying to keep the chest upright) it's getting to a more neutral position. The position it should start and stay in. If you have any money left over after buying some lifting shoes, immediately buy a belt.
    You're one of the few unfortunate folks that is going to have to modify the squat further from the model, but it doesn't mean it can't be done.
    Buy some shoes, turn out the toes more, get the back neutral and tight, lean over more to keep your center of mass over its center of balance, stay midfoot throughout the movement, buy some shoes.
    See if that helps.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    358

    Default

    don't let rip see these,
    have you read the book(s)?
    read the book,
    take the bar off your back,
    put your feet flat on the floor, shoulder width, toes out 30,
    learn the bottom position / stretch,

    L5S12019.jpg

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Posts
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Troupos View Post
    Buy some shoes, turn out the toes more, get the back neutral and tight, lean over more to keep your center of mass over its center of balance, stay midfoot throughout the movement, buy some shoes.
    See if that helps.
    Thanks a lot for the response, Pete. Yeah, bracing my core is something I'm definitely forgetting. I think I'm overextending is because I've had some pretty bad back rounding issues in the past, and maybe I'm trying to compensate for that. Will in my next workout.

    I understand the shoes will provide more stability than that crappy piece of wood while still demanding less ankle flexion; is there another advantage I'm ignoring?

    Quote Originally Posted by neilc1 View Post
    don't let rip see these,
    have you read the book(s)?L5S12019.jpg
    I have. Have you read my post?

    I don't mind Mark seeing these. The whole point of the post is for more experienced people to look at it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    690

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MartinG View Post
    I understand the shoes will provide more stability than that crappy piece of wood while still demanding less ankle flexion; is there another advantage I'm ignoring?
    Definitely more stability than squishy, running shoes. A better sense of balance than standing on a wooden shim because the angle is consistent. Not accidentally kicking a piece of wood while trying to get into position with a bar on your back. There's very few reasons not to squat in lifting shoes if you can get them.

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