Lowbar Squat advice pt.II Lowbar Squat advice pt.II

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Thread: Lowbar Squat advice pt.II

  1. #1
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    Default Lowbar Squat advice pt.II

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    Hello everyone,

    Since my old thread somehow doesn't get any replies, I thought I'd start a new one. Still the issue is my squat form. Here's the most recent video of me where I tried, following Pete's advice, to bend more in the knees:

    YouTube

    Thank you very much,

    Alceste

  2. #2
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    Faster knees. Stay leaned over at the bottom. Do not pause.

  3. #3
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    I am uncertain as to what "faster knees" should mean - but then again English is not my native language would you care to elaborate what you mean by that? Also I don't get the second sentence: It seems to me that it implies that I am changing my back angle, which however I don't as far as I can see.
    Wrt the pause: I see that however in the subsequent reps I try to get more of a natural motion going. Yet to blatantly honest since I am not sure as to what I'm doing is correct / deep enough I tend to slow down.

  4. #4
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    I also forgot to mention that Pete said that I wasn't balancing my weight over the middle of my foot. I provided a link to the old thread in my opening post of this thread.

  5. #5
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    Default Old thread

    Okay I just realized that I can't modify my opening post so here's the link to the old thread:

    Lowbar Squat advise

  6. #6
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    Get your chest up to set the upper back so the whole spine is rigid. Move your eye gaze out a foot or two.
    You need to stay leaned over as you approach the bottom and keep your hips back away from your feet. The hips need to reach back as you hit depth so you stay midfoot and the knees don't want to punch forward.
    Lean over more at the start and try to touch your ass to the wall behind you.

  7. #7
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    Did realize you were waiting on a response from the original thread. I must've missed that.

  8. #8
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    okay I thought I was doing something different but I realized after watching the video at home that I didn't. Gonna try again on wednesday. If you want to have a look anyways: YouTube

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Troupos View Post
    Get your chest up to set the upper back so the whole spine is rigid. Move your eye gaze out a foot or two.
    You need to stay leaned over as you approach the bottom and keep your hips back away from your feet. The hips need to reach back as you hit depth so you stay midfoot and the knees don't want to punch forward.
    Lean over more at the start and try to touch your ass to the wall behind you.
    okay so somehow my post prioir to posting the new video was lost. I'll sum up what I tried to say. I am somewhat confused / frustrated because somewhere on the line of all these videos I did squat with more lean however that resulted in me squatting from my heels and rounding my lower back. So in a way I feel like either I stay upright and slam into my knees or I lean more and get lower back rounding as well as squatting from the heels. Or is this all just a matter of figuring out the golden intersection between leaning in yet staying on midfoot and not rounding the lower back?

  10. #10
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    starting strength coach development program
    The correct back angle is ultimately determined by the midfoot balance point of the lifter and their anthropometry. You're leaning over and shoving your hips back to create a longer moment at the hip, but the degree is determined by your ability to stay balanced on midfoot.
    You're starting to lean, but you're letting the hips come back forward as you approach depth. You'd be better served feeling where your balance is along the foot, and adjusting to make sure your weight is on midfoot.
    Does that answer your question?

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