Squat, Deadlft, Bench Press - Form Check, novice appreciates any help Squat, Deadlft, Bench Press - Form Check, novice appreciates any help

starting strength gym
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Squat, Deadlft, Bench Press - Form Check, novice appreciates any help

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    5

    Default Squat, Deadlft, Bench Press - Form Check, novice appreciates any help

    • wichita falls texas december seminar 2020
    • wichita falls texas february 2021 seminar
    Hi everybody! So I am new to barbell training, I have read Starting Strengh, I have watched a whole lot of videos and I record myself every time to check on my technique. After six weeks of trying to figure it out on my own I thought I might dare to share my videos and hopefully get some feedback that will help me to improve. My concern number one is not getting injured and especially protect my back which caused me enough issues in the last few years.

    I tried to follow all the "how to record" guidelines but since my "gym" is also my office, laundry room etc. I had a hard time recording from a diagonal angle. Hope it still shows enough.

    Deadlift: Deadlift 01 - YouTube

    Squat side angle: Squat 01 - YouTube
    I am really not sure about my form. Do I have to much of an arch?

    Squat front angle; so that you can see what my knees are doing: Squat 02 - YouTube

    Bench press: Bench - YouTube
    Is the wrist - elbow position ok? Should the wrist be more in alignment with the elbow? I am afraid if I move the wrist more forward I might tilt forward under the pressure of the weight.

    Squat weight: 32,5 kg (70 pounds)
    Deadlift weight: 60 kg (132 pounds)
    Benchpress weight: 45 kg (99 pounds)
    Bodyweight: 67 kg (148 pounds)

    Squat is definitely my weak spot. It took my a few weeks of mobility work with my physical therapist to get rid of what was suspected to be impingement syndom, so now I am just starting to add some weight but I am really unsure about my technique. Should I feel exhaustion in my quads? Because my quads do not really feel exhausted afterwards. I have the feeling my glutes / hip give up before I actually reach the point where my quads would get some serious work done.

    Any help very much appreciated - thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    754

    Default

    Quick look on your DL shows a far-too-wide stance. Also wondering if your grip is too far out. And, avoid any arm-bend. I think maintenance of lumbar extension is good. Perhaps be a little more patient in the setup, and verify that the weight is over mid-foot just before you leg-press the floor away. You can adjust you balance by slightly rocking forward or back, in the starting “tripod” position.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    277

    Default

    DL: Can't see as much from this angle, but stance does seem too wide and thus arms are probably a touch too wide. Filming from the front 45 will generally give more information.

    SQ: You are doing a High Bar squat. Not much technique to this version, though you are staying a bit too upright on some reps causing you to lose a bit of balance as you shift back on your heels. Still need to lean over a touch in the high bar squat. I assume you don't have the flexibility for low-bar?

    BP: Lower the hooks a bit so the bar is not so high. You want to have slightly bent arms when you set up so that you can lock your arms out and clear the hooks with the barbell before bringing it over your shoulders. Pause between each rep (at the top) and take a big breath and re-engage your arch/tightness. Stay tight as you touch your chest and think "back" with the barbell to get it over your shoulders again. Why are you doing 8 reps for BP? That is not part of the first 6 weeks of the program.
    __________________________________________________
    Science for Fitness:
    Online Strength Coaching, Nutrition Coaching, & In-Person Training

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    860

    Default

    Some thoughts on your bench:

    1) If you can, get a spotter or move your bench a little further under the uprights. You seem like you're struggling a bit to unrack the weight, and this will only get harder as the weight goes up. Close the distance between the uprights and the start position. You look almost completely stretched out at the start of the set.

    2) Slow down and pause at the top of each rep, especially the first one. Your breathing is hard to follow, but it doesn't seem correct. You should either take a huge breath before the first rep and hold it throughout the set or pause and take a huge breath before each rep. I prefer the former as it helps me prevent my chest from dropping between each rep.

    3) Put your feet out in front of you a little further to help with leg drive. Make sure your feet are flat on the floor then drive your toes into your shoes when pushing the bar up. Your butt should almost come off the bench but ultimately should not actually come up.

    4) Get your chest up higher. You want to minimize the distance between where the bar touches you (which looks a little high, kind of hard to tell from the angle) and the lockout position. Rotate your chest up as high as you can while setting up. You do this by squeezing your shoulder blades back and driving the top of your back into the bench when setting up. #s 1 & 3 above should also help with this.
    4a) Remember to drive your upper back into the bench during the bar ascent. Setting up properly helps with this a lot.

    5) Get and keep your head off the bench. Will help with #4 above. You don't want to be driving your head into the bench, just the upper back.

    6) Can't see the elbows / forearm verticality / grip width too well, but make sure your grip is one hand width away from the smooth center of the barbell. Rip has a video on this.
    Last edited by Eric Schexnayder; 07-30-2020 at 07:34 AM. Reason: #6 unclear

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Thank you so much for taking the time to watch my videos and respond. I really appreciate that. Yesterday I recorded a new deadlift video and tried a narrower stance and grip as suggested. Also made a front angle video. What Do you guys think? The other suggestion will incorporated in the next training.

    Deadlift side angle: Deadlift 31.7. Side Angle - YouTube

    Deadlift front angle: Deadlift 31.7. Front Angle - YouTube

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    277

    Default

    Filming from the front at a 45 degree angle will give the most information (for future reference). However, I can see that your gaze is leaving the ground when you lockout. Keep it there. Also, be sure to stand up all the way to lock out (hips through, chest proud). In terms of your setup, take a grip that is a finger or two wider so that you can push your knees out at a slight angle into your arms.
    __________________________________________________
    Science for Fitness:
    Online Strength Coaching, Nutrition Coaching, & In-Person Training

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    754

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hayden-William Courtland View Post
    In terms of your setup, take a grip that is a finger or two wider so that you can push your knees out at a slight angle into your arms.
    Stance isn’t still too wide? Seems like the distance between the heels could be about halved. Or would that be too narrow?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    277

    Default

    Your stance is fine now. No need to push it to super narrow right now. Just widen your grip so you can get your knees out.
    __________________________________________________
    Science for Fitness:
    Online Strength Coaching, Nutrition Coaching, & In-Person Training

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Thanks for all the help. Regarding my gaze while doing deadlifts: Since a stand right in front of the wall I cant gaze 12-15 feet ahead as suggested in the book. If I understood it correctly I should just keep the gaze at the same spot where I look at as I start the deadlift - so looking down still when I am already fully standing?

    Yesterday I tried to work on squats and bench and include all the suggestions made.

    Squat: Tried to lean more foreward, is that ok now? Is the arch ok or to much? I do High Bar Squats cause my physical therapist told my with my back pain story (broken disk and chronical pain for years) high bar would put less stress on my back (but more on my knees which did not complain so far)
    Squat Side Angle: Squat Side Angle 2.8. - YouTube
    Squat 45 Degree front angle: Squat Front Angle 2.8 - YouTube

    Bench Press: I lowered the pin, focused on breathing and thinking "back" while pushing and leg drive although it is still so much to focus on that at times I forgot to really use the legs. I guess that will come with time. I think my elbow position is not correct (although it does not show well on the video) but I guess the weight pushes my hands/wrists to far back behind my elbows. What do you think? Does it look better than last time?
    Bench Press 2.8. - YouTube

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    277

    Default

    starting strength coach development program
    DL: You can still put your gaze roughly where 12-15 ahead would be through the wall. It's not ideal, but doable.

    SQ: The DL should (and is) a heavier weight than the SQ and it is directly loading your back, so I wouldn't rule out the low-bar squat based on the reasons your therapist gave, but staying with high bar for now as you build up some strength is fine. You are arching your back way too much. Take a big breath with each rep while bearing down on your abs is if about to be punched. Your back should be flat. Your early reps are also too high. Get deeper like in the last 2 reps.

    BP: Much better. Having your feet a touch closer to the bench may help. Wrists don't look that bad either. The left one might be bending back a touch too much.
    __________________________________________________
    Science for Fitness:
    Online Strength Coaching, Nutrition Coaching, & In-Person Training

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •