High bar squat - left knee cave in even with hard orthotics (shouting doesn't fix it) High bar squat - left knee cave in even with hard orthotics (shouting doesn't fix it)

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Thread: High bar squat - left knee cave in even with hard orthotics (shouting doesn't fix it)

  1. #1
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    Default High bar squat - left knee cave in even with hard orthotics (shouting doesn't fix it)

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    Hello guys,

    Disclaimer: I cannot low bar squat because I don't have the shoulder mobility to do it. I have tried several times before and It gives me all types of pain. That's why I have resorted to high bar squatting.

    The question:

    I have a problem with my left leg, it caves in. At the beginning I thought I had a leg length discrepancy, but I went to the doctor and the x-rays showed otherwise. However, the doctor discovered that my left foot arch collapses very easily, so he told me to squat in hard orthotics (which is what Rip suggests for this kind of problem). I try to push my knees out as much as I can but I still get some level of caving in from the left leg, a lot less than before using hard orthotics though.

    My question is, is this level of "caving in" acceptable, is it advisable to keep adding weight? Taking weight of the bar and working my way up with super perfect form hasn't worked, I always get this level of "caving in" which is a lot less than before the orthotics.

    Here is the video of the first set with 115Kg. It's from the back, so the knee caving in can be seen more clearly.

    High Bar Squat - 115Kg - Set 1 - YouTube

    Just for some other context information I'm 1.87m tall, weight close to a 100Kg, and the other lifts go up nicely it's only the squat that's problematic.

  2. #2
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    Hi Rip, I assume you mean that there is a problem with the video angle. The problem is that when I use a 45 degree angle I can't see the knee caving in because it does it very subtly. Would a 45 degree angle be preferred?

  4. #4
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    Based on your grip width on the high bar, I have a really hard time believing you don’t have the shoulder mobility to move the bar down and do a low bar squat. Maybe you don’t have the mobility to move it down and hold it the wrong way, but it certainly looks like you have the mobility to. I’ve it down and hold it the right way.

    Anyway, your stance looks too wide.

  5. #5
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    Default

    Depth?

  6. #6
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    That day I didn't record from the side, by I always hit depth, I'm sure of it.

    I make sure that the crease of the shorts goes a little bit bellow the top of the knee. That's why I started using white shorts, the crease can be seen more easily in videos.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank_B View Post
    Anyway, your stance looks too wide.
    Really?! I think my heels are vertical with my armpits, which would be the suggested stance.

    In this quest for solving the knee caving in I've tried closer and wider stances, and this one is the only one I feel strong and stable in.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rory M View Post
    Really?! I think my heels are vertical with my armpits, which would be the suggested stance.

    In this quest for solving the knee caving in I've tried closer and wider stances, and this one is the only one I feel strong and stable in.
    Well, the high bar squat is going to force your knees to come a little further forward and the back angle a little more upright. If your stance is wider than it should be and the knees have to come further forward, what do you think they're going to do?

    As far as depth goes... If Rip is questioning your depth and not giving you a form check... ummm... You're high.

  9. #9
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    starting strength coach development program
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank_B View Post
    Well, the high bar squat is going to force your knees to come a little further forward and the back angle a little more upright. If your stance is wider than it should be and the knees have to come further forward, what do you think they're going to do?

    As far as depth goes... If Rip is questioning your depth and not giving you a form check... ummm... You're high.
    OK, I will try a closer stance and see how it goes. I've also been thinking about trying to shift my hips to the right to try to compensate that left lean that I have.

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